Mueller report

Capitol Ink | The Coming Storm

‘I’ll be sore tomorrow’: Solidcore, staring contests and scarfing some candy — Congressional Hits and Misses
Week of May 6, 2019

A Capitol tour guide demonstrates the whisper spot in Statuary Hall on Wednesday, May 8. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Capitol Ink | Open and Shut

Capitol Ink | Trumpty Dumpty Stonewall

KFC, the Grim Reaper and an epically long bill reading: Congressional Hits and Misses
Week of April 29, 2019

An aide adjusts the name plate for Attorney General William Barr before a House Judiciary Committee hearing. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Capitol Ink | Snitty Words

Lawmakers grill Barr about past testimonies on Mueller report

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., looks over papers before the start of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Wednesday, May 1. Attorney General William P. Barr testified during the hearing. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Road ahead: More on the Mueller report; floor action on Paris bill, nominations
Oversight matters will get most attention post-Mueller but House and Senate proceeding with normal business too

Attorney General William Barr appears on a television in the Capitol subway on April 18, 2019. He is testifying before the Senate and House Judiciary Committees this week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Two days of testimony from Attorney General William Barr on the 448-page report from special counsel Robert S. Mueller III will largely define Congress’ return from its two-week recess, with the House and Senate heading in different directions. 

Senate Republicans, who will hear from Barr first on Wednesday, feel Mueller’s report is the appropriate conclusion to years of investigations into allegations that President Donald Trump’s campaign coordinated with the Russians to interfere in the 2016 election and that the president himself attempted to obstruct those investigations.

Trump: ‘We’re fighting all the subpoenas’
 

‘I don’t think it’s a growing number’: Pelosi denies uptick in support for impeaching Trump
Speaker acknowledges some caucus support for impeachment but more want to simply follow the investigations

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., says she does not believe support among House Democrats for impeaching the president is growing. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Tuesday sought to tamp down on speculation that her caucus is fractured over the question of impeaching President Donald Trump and pushed back on reports that support for such a move is increasing.

“I don’t think there’s big divisions in our caucus,” Pelosi said at the TIME 100 Summit in New York on Tuesday. She was responding to a question about House Democrats’ discussing whether they should move forward with impeachment proceedings against Trump in light of evidence unveiled in special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report.