Mo Brooks

Brooks Announces Primary Challenge to Strange
Joins crowded primary for Senate seat incumbent was appointed to by governor who resigned

Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala., will announce his candidacy for the Senate on Monday with events in several Alabama cities. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks announced Monday he will challenge Sen. Luther Strange in the state’s Republican primary.

The congressman was to make a round of news conferences around the state to announce his campaign, but broke the news early on Dale Jackson’s talk show on WVNN

Senate Leadership Fund Requests Records in Alabama Race
Super PAC wants records onStrange’s primary challengers

Sen. Luther Strange, R-Ala., was appointed to the Senate in February. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

In another sign that the Senate Leadership Fund is aggressively supporting GOP Sen. Luther Strange, the Super PAC filed a public records request Thursday for correspondence between his challengers and Alabama’s current governor. The governor recently moved up the special election for the Alabama Republican’s seat by a year.

Strange is facing a primary in August to remain in the Senate. He was appointed to the Senate in February after former Sen. Jeff Sessions became Attorney General. Strange already has one primary opponent, and could face at least two more. 

Klan Prosecutor Joins Alabama Senate Race
Former U.S. Attorney Doug Jones is first significant Democratic candidate to run for Strange’s seat

Doug Jones speaks to reporters in 2005 after Eric Rudolph pled guilty to setting off a bomb at a Birmingham, Alabama women’s clinic while Jones was U.S. attorney. (Brian Schoenhals/Getty Images file photo)

Former U.S. Attorney Doug Jones on Wednesday became the first prominent Democrat to enter the race for Jeff Sessions’ former Senate seat in Alabama.

Jones is best known for prosecuting Ku Klux Klan members who bombed the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham in 1963, killing four young girls and injuring 22 others. 

Brooks ‘Very Much’ Weighing Challenge to Strange
Alabama congressman

Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala., said the time he’d have to spend away from family is a “big factor” in his consideration of running for the Senate. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks said he is “very much” considering a challenge to Sen. Luther Strange in the state’s Republican primary.

"We are very much exploring it as a possibility," Brooks told the Montgomery Advertiser.

Photos of the Day: Health Care Passes House as Senate Passes Spending Bill
May 4 as captured by Roll Call's photographers

Rep. Glenn Grothman, R-Wis., gives a thumbs up to protesters on the East Front of the Capitol after the House passed the Republicans' bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act on Thursday. The protesters support the ACA. ( Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By BILL CLARK and TOM WILLIAMS CQ Roll Call

The Hill was abuzz with activity Thursday as the House passed a health care package to repeal and replace Obamacare

Word on the Hill: Party Time
Burgers in Cannon today

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi speaks with her husband, Paul, center, and Pennsylvania Sen. Bob Casey at an Atlantic/CBS News pre-party before the 2016 White House Corespondents’ Association Dinner. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner is a day away. But Friday is a big night for parties to start the weekend off.

RealClearPolitics, the Distilled Spirits Council, the National Restaurant Association and the Beer Institute are joining for the first annual Toast to the First Amendment. It is from 7 to 10 p.m. at the National Restaurant Association, 2055 L St. NW.

GOP Moderates Face Health Care Heat
‘Many of our members who were opposed to the bill are probably still opposed’

Rep. Tom MacArthur, R-N.J., leaves a meeting of the House Republican Conference in the Capitol on April 26, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By LINDSEY McPHERSON and ERIN MERSHON, CQ ROLL CALL

Conservative Republicans put their moderate colleagues in the health care hot seat Wednesday.

Rogers’ Bill Would Tax Undocumenteds to Pay for Wall
Would impose a 2 percent fee on wire transfers to home countries

Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Ala., introduced legislation that would have undocumented immigrants pay for a wall on the U.S.-Mexico Border. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Alabama Republican Rep. Mike Rogers introduced legislation that would make undocumented immigrants pay for a border wall between the U.S. and Mexico.

The bill introduced Tuesday would impose a 2 percent fee on all wire transfers to the home country of undocumented immigrants, AL.com reported.

Trump Criticizes Ongoing House Probe of Russian Election Meddling
President also says Freedom Caucus found way to 'snatch defeat from the jaws of victory'

President Donald Trump used a series of Monday night tweets to question a House panel's probe of potential ties between his 2016 campaign and Russia. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Updated at 8:27 a.m. President Donald Trump used a Monday night Twitter tirade to question the ongoing House investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election, showing little concern that his comments might taint the probe.

Previous presidents have been careful to avoid creating any perception that they are using the powers or political heft of the office to influence congressional or federal law enforcement investigations. Trump’s top spokesman, Sean Spicer, has mostly done the same when asked about separate probes being conducted by the House and Senate Intelligence committees.

A Republican Party Pulled in Multiple Directions
Same factors could bedevil other legislative priorities

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan will face the same factions in his Republican caucus that helped sink the GOP health care measure. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan wasted no time, fresh off his defeat on the Republican health care plan, in pivoting to priorities like a tax overhaul. But the constituencies pulling his party in different directions will still be present for those complicated debates as well.

“Our members know that we did everything we could to get consensus,” the Wisconsin Republican said shortly after he pulled a measure that would have partially accomplished what has motivated his party for more than seven years: getting rid of the 2010 health care law. But in the end, the GOP’s factions pulled it in so many directions that they couldn’t even muster a majority to pass a bill that would put a win on the board.