Mick Mulvaney

Confirmation Specualtion Swirls in the Senate
Leaders are negotiating whether Cabinet picks can be swiftly confirmed Friday

Defense Secretary nominee James Mattis could be one of the nominees confirmed on Friday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

<strong>By BRIDGET BOWMAN AND NIELS LESNIEWSKI</strong><br> <strong>CQ Roll Call</strong>

Senators’ focus on President-elect Donald Trump’s Cabinet nominees continued Wednesday afternoon, with some attention turning toward which nominees might be confirmed on Friday.

Mulvaney: I Paid $15,583 in Back Taxes for Household Employee

Rep. Mick Mulvaney, R-S.C., participates in the Citizens Against Government Waste press conference to release the 2016 Congressional Pig Book report on pork spending on Wednesday, April 13, 2016, at the Phoenix Park Hotel in Washington. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Mick Mulvaney, the staunch conservative nominated to become President-elect Donald Trump’s budget chief, failed to pay more than $15,000 in federal payroll taxes for a past household employee, he told the Senate Budget Committee in a questionnaire.

“I have come to learn, during the confirmation review process, that I failed to pay FICA and federal and state unemployment taxes on a household employee for the years 2000-2004,” Mulvaney, R-S.C., wrote in a section of the document, obtained by Roll Call on Wednesday. “Upon discovery of that shortfall, I paid the federal taxes.”

44 Sitting Members of Congress Have Accepted Donations From Trump
Group includes prominent lawmakers from both parties

Arizona Sen. John McCain, whom President-elect Donald Trump once criticized, has received the most donations of any current lawmaker from Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Much has been said about how Vice President-elect Mike Pence, with his 12 years as a congressman, could be incoming President Donald Trump’s bridge to Congress. But Trump has his own ties to the Hill, in the form of nearly two decades worth of political contributions to sitting members of the House and Senate on both sides of the aisle.

Trump has donated to the campaigns of 44 current members of Congress, according to a Roll Call review of Federal Election Commission electronic records that are available since 1997. Nineteen of those members are in the Senate, and 25 are in the House.

Freshmen Backed by Freedom Caucus Aren’t Committing to Joining
Caucus leaders expect some non-freshmen to help replenish their ranks

The political arm of the House Freedom Caucus backed Indiana Republican Jim Banks, but he has not yet decided to join the caucus if invited. (Meredith Dake/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The House Freedom Caucus is currently down seven members from the 114th Congress — and possibly two more.

South Carolina Rep. Mick Mulvaney is awaiting confirmation as President-elect Donald Trump’s director of the Office of Management and Budget.

Trump Transforms GOP Into the Softer-On-Russia Party
Democrats may hit pay-dirt with anti-Putin tactics in special elections

President-elect Donald Trump’s tilt toward Russia represents a repudiation of American policy dating back 70 years, Walter Shapiro writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

If the rise of Donald Trump has taught us anything (a debatable assumption), it is that the news media has the attention span of an old-time Hollywood agent making deals on four phones simultaneously.

No matter how big the headlines or breathless the tweets, it’s on to the next frenzied furor within hours. That’s the 21st-century way. And it is probably going to doom any sustained outrage — no matter how justified — over Russian intervention during the 2016 campaign.

Lawmakers Return to Mounting Trump Contradictions Ahead of Inauguration
Murky legislative outlook as president-elect’s rhetoric, picks fail to neatly align

President-elect Donald Trump speaks during a stop on his “USA Thank You Tour 2016” in Orlando, Fla., on Dec. 16. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images file photo)

Trump Nominates Anti-Deficit Crusader Mulvaney to Head OMB
South Carolina Republican expressed interest in position before election

South Carolina Rep. Mick Mulvaney is President-elect Donald Trump’s pick for director of the Office of Management and Budget, where he would play a central role in complex major health care and tax changes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President-elect Donald Trump announced Saturday the nomination of South Carolina Rep. Mick Mulvaney, an opponent of government spending who rode the 2010 tea party wave to Congress, for director of the Office of Management and Budget.

Word on the Hill: The Mystery of Mulvaney’s Missing Desk
A senator hits the big 5-0, and giving blood, sweat, and tears … and blood

Rep. Mick Mulvaney, left, thought fellow South Carolina Rep. Trey Gowdy, right, might have hidden his desk. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Mick Mulvaney, R-S.C., thought he might have been punked by one of his colleagues after his desk went missing while his office was being moved.

Mulvaney was moving offices as part of the relocating that takes place with a new Congress, but realized his desk wasn’t where it was supposed to be. He said members were told they didn’t have to pack the contents of their desks, so all of his stuff is missing, too.

House Freedom Caucus Elects Board Members, Meadows to Run for Chairman
Brat, Hice and Perry replace Garrett, Fleming and Salmon on board

North Carolina Rep. Mark Meadows, left, is running for House Freedom Caucus chairman since Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan has decided not to seek another term atop the conservative caucus. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Freedom Caucus elected three new board members Tuesday night, as North Carolina Rep. Mark Meadows announced he plans to run for caucus chairman. 

Current caucus head, Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio, who has led the conservative group since it’s inception in early 2015, told Roll Call he does not plan to seek another term as chairman. 

Ryan, Praised for Inclusiveness, Faces Hurdles Seeking Another Speaker Term
Conservatives say they'll weigh elections results, lame-duck action

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan touts the House Republican policy agenda after a GOP conference meeting in September. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Paul D. Ryan’s first as year as House speaker played out like a roller coaster. But despite the rocky ride, the Wisconsin Republican reaches his one-year anniversary Oct. 29 earning relatively high marks from many in his caucus.

Praised for bringing a more inclusive leadership style to the fractious House GOP conference, Ryan, 46, is widely expected to seek another term as speaker during the upcoming lame-duck session, despite talk of opposition from more conservative lawmakers and grousing from some of the Republican faithful about his contortions over Donald Trump's presidential bid.