Mick Mulvaney

White House Signals Own Path on Health Care
Reference to president’s own plan signals dual tracks for GOP

That President Donald Trump could roll out his own health care overhaul plan was something his top spokesman would not rule out on Wednesday. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Updated 4:40 p.m. | The White House declined Wednesday to rule out that President Donald Trump will push his own plan to replace the 2010 health care law rather than pursue one course with congressional Republicans.

When asked if there will be a single White House-congressional GOP plan, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer left the door open for Trump to roll out his own plan — no matter what lawmakers do. Minutes later, Spicer referred to “the president’s plan” when discussing how the administration intends to achieve one of its top campaign goals.

Trump Intends to Release 2018 Budget in Mid-March

President Donald Trump speaks at the GOP Congressional retreat in Philadelphia on Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017. House and Senate Republicans are holding their retreat through Friday in Philadelphia. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Pool)

President Donald Trump’s administration is aiming to release a fiscal 2018 budget outline on March 14, a White House official confirmed Sunday to CQ.

The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said it is the White House’s “intention” to release the outline, also called a “skinny” budget, on that date.

Ep. 5: Why Trump’s New Budget Director Should Prepare for a Fight
Budget Tracker Extra

President Donald Trump finally has his budget director Mick Mulvaney in place, but with a daunting agenda it’s unclear how much he can get accomplished, says CQ Budget Tracker Editor David Lerman. Mulvaney faces, among other challenges, an April deadline when government funding expires and the unknown costs of Republican efforts to repeal and replace Obamacare.

Trump Comes Out Swinging Against Familiar Foes
Ignoring stumbles, president says administration is a ‘fine-tuned machine’

President Donald Trump focused on familiar targets in his news conference on Thursday. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Thursday handed the Senate a new Labor secretary nominee who has previously been approved by the chamber three times — but he used the next 75 minutes to rouse his base and goad his critics. 

Trump walked into the East Room of the White House and announced that Alexander Acosta, a former assistant attorney general, will be his second pick to run the Labor Department after fast-food mogul Andrew Puzder withdrew his nomination on Wednesday.

Mulvaney Confirmed as Budget Director
Arizona’s John McCain is only defector in party-line vote

South Carolina Rep. Mick Mulvaney was confirmed as director of the Office of Management and Budget on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate confirmed Rep. Mick Mulvaney as the new director of the Office of Management and Budget on Thursday morning, allowing the budget process to move forward.

The South Carolina Republican was confirmed by a 51-49 vote, with Senate Armed Services Chairman John McCain the only Republican defector. The Arizona senator announced on Wednesday that he could not support Mulvaney’s nomination because of the congressman’s work to cut defense spending. 

Why Democrats Didn’t Go to the Mat on Linda McMahon
Former WWE chief breezed to confirmation

Blumenthal, left, and McMahon, right, previously ran against each other for the Connecticut Senate seat. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

President Donald Trump’s Cabinet nominees have sparked fierce fights in the Senate, but Democrats declined to go to the mat on one of his picks: former World Wrestling Entertainment CEO Linda McMahon. 

The businesswoman and two-time Republican Senate nominee from Connecticut was easily confirmed Tuesday morning to lead the Small Business Administration, with 81 senators voting in her favor. On the surface, that may seem surprising, given that Democrats have decried Trump’s nominees’ exorbitant wealth and their lack of governing experience.

McConnell Lines Up Slew of Cabinet Nominee Votes
Mick Mulvaney will be first of half-dozen nominations to get vote

South Carolina Rep. Mick Mulvaney is expected to receive a vote on his nomination to head the Office of Management and Budget this week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has laid the groundwork for another procedural slog on the Senate floor that could stretch into the early part of March.

First up after a previously scheduled vote Tuesday morning on Linda McMahon’s nomination to helm the Small Business Administration will be the Office of Management and Budget director nominee, Rep. Mick Mulvaney. The South Carolina Republican will receive a vote this week after what’s expected to be a blistering debate likely focused on his tea party past, including his past opposition to increased defense spending.

It’s Huge: Trump Administration Sets Record with Empty OMB Director Slot
S.C. Republican Rep. Mick Mulvaney still waiting for confirmation

Rep. Mick Mulvaney, R-S.C., President Donald Trump’s nominee to be director of the Office of Management and Budget, testifies during his Senate Budget Committee confirmation on January 24, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate’s slow pace in confirming Cabinet nominees appears to be holding up lawmakers’ work on major fiscal legislation while they wait for President Donald Trump’s budget shop to get up and running.

The White House needs to move on budget priorities and discretionary spending levels for fiscal 2018; a wrap-up of fiscal 2017 appropriations; and supplemental funding requests to boost military spending and begin construction of a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border.

Puzder Employed Undocumented Housekeeper
Labor nominee has paid back taxes

Puzder says he has paid all outstanding back taxes on the undocumented worker he employed as a housekeeper. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Labor Secretary nominee Andrew Puzder said Monday evening that he had employed a housekeeper who did not have the proper documents to work in the United States.

“My wife and I employed a housekeeper for a few years, during which I was unaware that she was not legally permitted to work in the U.S.,” Puzder said in a written statement Monday. “When I learned of her status, we immediately ended her employment and offered her assistance in getting legal status. We have fully paid back taxes to the IRS and the state of California and submitted all required paperwork.”

Trump Vows Military Build-up, Despite Budget Law
New commander in chief declares America 'ready to fight'

Mulvaney might not think much of the administration’s vow to increase defense spending. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump says he’ll make an “historic” investment in the military, but it’s unclear how that will happen without delicate spending negotiations with Congress, and maybe even his own pick to lead the Office of Management and Budget, Mick Mulvaney, a South Carolina Republican whose reputation is first and foremost as a deficit hawk.

Fresh off a weekend at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Fla., Trump made his way to the Gulf Coast to address troops at U.S. Central Command and U.S. Special Operations Command headquarters in Tampa.