Michelle Lujan Grisham

Maybe They’re Too Rich for Congress?
Seventeen members departing the Capitol are millionaires

California Rep. Darrell Issa is not running for a 10th term this year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The wealthy are heading for the exits.

So far, 44 current lawmakers, or one in 12, have announced they are retiring at the end of the year or seeking new offices away from the Capitol. And collectively, they now account for nearly a third of the $2.43 billion in cumulative riches of the 115th Congress.

Spotlight on House After Senate Failure to Pass DACA Fix
White House puts pressure on House Republicans to advance conservative bill

Speaker Paul D. Ryan has said the House will only take up an immigration bill if it has President Donald Trump’s support. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate’s failure to advance immigration legislation last week took some pressure off House Republican leaders whose members wanted to ensure their chamber would offer a conservative counterproposal rather than just accept whatever the Senate produced.

But the White House — blamed by Democrats for killing a bipartisan Senate measure they believe could have cleared a 60-vote threshold without administration interference — is trying to keep the heat on the House.

House Republicans’ Immigration Bill Not Ready for Floor Action
Whip team says they will continue to refine the legislation

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., and his team did a whip count on a GOP immigration bill, and it showed the measure wasn’t quite ready for a floor vote. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans’ preferred immigration bill is not ready for a floor vote, a Wednesday whip check showed, but leadership is expected to continue working it.

The bill by House Judiciary Chairman Robert W. Goodlatte and Homeland Security Chairman Michael McCaul is the most conservative of the proposals House and Senate lawmakers and the White House have floated for addressing the coming expiration of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

New Mexico Lawmakers Rip Newspaper for Racist ‘Dreamer’ Cartoon
Cartoon depicts white man calling gang members ‘Dreamers’ and ‘future Democrats’

A group of lawmakers from New Mexico denounced the cartoon by Sean Delonas in the Albuquerque Journal as racist. (Albuquerque Journal)

A bipartisan contingent of lawmakers from New Mexico tore into a newspaper from their home state for a cartoon depicting so-called “Dreamers” as machete-wielding gang members who mug white people.

The Albuquerque Journal ran the carton by syndicated cartoonist Sean Delonas in Tuesday’s paper, sparking outrage among immigration advocates and many of its readers.

When Is a Whip a Whip? House Democrats Might Not Be Best Ones to Ask Right Now
Mixed messages come from party critical of Trump for being inconsistent

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said she and her leadership team would not whip the vote on the budget deal. Then they started whipping the vote. Sort of. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Democratic leaders have spent the past 48 hours opposing the bipartisan budget deal but saying they’re not whipping it, and then kind of, sort of whipping it.

The inconsistent messaging is all the more notable given Democrats’ frequent criticism of President Donald Trump for wavering in his own policy positions.

House Leaders Face Threats of Intraparty Rebellion on Budget Deal
Conservatives are already balking and DACA proponents could be right behind

Speaker Paul D. Ryan arrives in the Capitol on Jan. 29. Ryan is already facing conservative opposition from his GOP conference to the reported budget deal in the works. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House Republicans’ day of reckoning is almost here.

As early as Wednesday, the four corners of congressional leadership are expected to announce a sweeping budget deal that could increase the sequestration spending caps by nearly $300 billion over two years, extend the debt ceiling without any spending changes designed to reduce the deficit, and appropriate more than $80 billion for disaster relief without pay-fors.

House Democrats Move Retreat to D.C.
Immigration and funding deadlines, 2018 messaging expected to be on agenda

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi speaks at a press conference with female House Democrats in the Capitol on Jan. 21. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 10:30 p.m. | With a Thursday government funding deadline looming and negotiations ongoing, House Democrats decided late Tuesday to move their retreat scheduled for Wednesday through Friday from Cambridge, Maryland, to the Capitol complex.

“Given the pressing issues Congress will likely vote on over the next three days, House Democrats will hold their United for A Better Tomorrow Issues Conference at the U.S. Capitol,” Democratic Caucus spokeswoman Lauren French said. “Scheduling updates will be shared as soon as they are available.” 

House Democrats to Leverage Budget Caps Support for Immigration Vote
Minority party wants Ryan to commit to House floor debate on DACA

From left, Connecticut Rep. Rosa DeLauro, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, Democratic Caucus Chairman Joseph Crowley and Minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer hold a news conference on Jan. 19 to blame Republicans for a potential government shutdown. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats are ready to play their trump card.

For months they’ve withheld support for stopgap spending bills in search of a broader budget agreement on lifting the sequestration spending caps and providing a legislative replacement to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program that is scheduled to end March 5.

House Democrats May Go There and Back to Retreat
Caucus confab scheduled in the middle of latest shutdown showdown

House Democratic Caucus Chairman Joseph Crowley, D-N.Y., says Democrats have flexibility in their plans to get to and from their retreat if they’re needed back in Washington because of a shutdown this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats have built flexibility into their retreat in Cambridge, Md., Wednesday through Friday should they need to return to Washington to deal with a Senate amendment to a House funding bill and have even begun plotting their leverage on that measure.

“We’re totally flexible,” House Democratic Caucus Chairman Joseph Crowley said. “We’re being very flexible, depending what happens. We’ll play it by ear,” the New Yorker added.

White House Would Trade DACA Doubling for Full Wall Funds
Democrats and Republicans expected to object to parts of plan

The White House is set to release its immigration overhaul soon. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 7:55 p.m. | The White House has crafted an immigration overhaul package that would offer a path to citizenship to an estimated 1.8 million “Dreamers” brought to the United States as children, restrict so-called chain migration and appropriate $30 billion for a border wall and other security measures.

The outlines of the White House proposal, which will be formally released Monday, will undoubtedly anger President Donald Trump’s populist base that supported his hard-line stance during the election as well as conservatives in the House and Democrats who believe his policies are anti-immigrant.