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GOP Moderates Still Holding Out on Health Care
18 members confirmed opposition while leadership remains optimistic

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., leaves Speaker of the House Paul Ryan’s office in the Capitol on Thursday, March 23, 2017. In the background, Capitol workers set up stanchions to keep the media from blocking the hallway. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By LINDSEY McPHERSON and ERIN MERSHON

Mixed messages about securing needed “yes” votes on the health care bill flew around the House Thursday as a flood of moderates confirmed they remain unswayed by the latest changes.

Democrats Keep Pounding on Michael Flynn
Sheldon Whitehouse refers to Trump as 'Swamp Thing'

Maryland Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, left, went after former national security adviser Michael Flynn again on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democrats kept hammering former national security adviser Michael Flynn as a pre-eminent example of what they call the Trump administration’s questionable ethics. 

Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, the ranking member on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, called Thursday for the declassification of documents related to the activities of Flynn, a onetime head of the Defense Intelligence Agency and a senior Trump campaign official.

Word on the Hill: Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day
Messages in pill bottles and Cory Booker’s birthday

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan poses with children of members of the media on Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day in 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In both the Capitol and the White House, staffers and the press corps have a chance today to participate in Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day.

House leadership has invited the media to bring their reporters-in-training to Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi’s weekly news conferences at 10:45 a.m.

Conservatives Begin to Accept Health Care Bill, Moderate Votes Unclear
‘Whether it’s this vehicle or another vehicle, it will be addressed.’

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., arrives for a hastily called House Republican caucus meeting after Speaker Ryan canceled the vote on the American Health Care Act of 2017 on Friday, March 24, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By LINDSEY McPHERSON and ERIN MERSHON

UPDATED 1:50 p.m. 04/26/17

Trump Challenges Federal Judge to High Court Duel Over Sanctuary Cities
President’s tweets rekindle battle with Ninth Circuit

President Donald Trump lashed out Wednesday at a federal judge who blocked another of his immigration executive orders. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump has a message for the federal judge who blocked his executive orders tailored to keep some so-called “sanctuary” cities from receiving federal funds: “See you in the Supreme Court!”

Trump took to Twitter before 7 a.m. Wednesday morning to blast a federal judge in California who on Tuesday issued a nationwide preliminary injunction against provisions in an executive order signed by Trump that is meant to block federal funding for “sanctuary” jurisdictions that decline to assist federal authorities in enforcing immigration laws.

White House: Final Health Care Deal Unlikely This Week
Tax package appears months away from hitting Capitol Hill

President Donald Trump watches the lighting of memorial candles during the annual Days of Remembrance Holocaust ceremony in the Capitol Rotunda on April 25, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A deal with House Republicans this week on health care is unlikely, a White House official said, and it will be at least six weeks before any tax reform legislation receives serious action on Capitol Hill.

President Donald Trump shocked congressional Republicans last week when he said he wanted a vote on a revised measure that would repeal and replace the Obama administration’s 2010 health care law. But with lawmakers slogging toward a Friday government-shutdown deadline, and with thorny issues remaining on a new health bill, it appears any pact on the latter is at least a week away.

Should Democrats Turn to South Carolina’s Special Election Next?
Next week’s primaries could set up another competitive contest

Archie Parnell is the leading Democrat running for the seat left behind by former Rep. Mick Mulvaney, who’s now the director of the Office of Management and Budget. (Screenshot, Courtesy Archie Parnell for Congress)

Democrats enthused by last week’s primary in Georgia, and their strong showing in Kansas earlier this month, have been making noise about playing more aggressively in upcoming elections that were previously dismissed as long shots — specifically Montana.

Mentioned less often, however, is South Carolina.

Opinion: Congress Can Work — If Trump Gets Out of the Way
Lawmakers can make a deal and avoid a shutdown

President Donald Trump should heed Gen. George S. Patton’s advice: “Lead, follow, or get out of the way” — so Congress can function, Patricia Murphy writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

First the bad news about negotiations over the 2017 spending bill that Congress needs to pass before midnight on Friday or face a government shutdown: The last several days have been a mess of mixed messages about what should get funded, last-minute demands that cannot be met, and disagreement at the highest levels about how to proceed.

But the good news for Republicans, and really for all of us exhausted by the thought of yet another standoff over basic funding levels, is that nearly all of the bad habits of negotiating and governance on this issue have been confined to the White House.

Word on the Hill: Golf Day on Capitol Hill
Free pretzels and shuffling staffers

It's National Golf Day. Here is Florida Rep. Tom Rooney teeing off as Tennessee Rep. Jim Cooper, California Rep. Duncan Hunter and Pennsylvania Rep. Mike Doyle watch during the First Tee Congressional Challenge golf tournament in 2015. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s National Golf Day, which means golf industry leaders and PGA Tour winner Billy Hurley III will be on Capitol Hill.

A coalition of golf’s leading organizations, known as WE ARE GOLF, is scheduled to meet with members of Congress to discuss the sports economy and impact.

Schumer Hopeful That Trump Has Caved on the Wall
Calls Trump’s comments to conservative journalists ‘really good news’

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer is warning against "poison pills." (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Even after President Donald Trump tweeted, “Don't let the fake media tell you that I have changed my position on the WALL,” the Senate's top Democrat is sounding optimistic that the commander-in-chief has caved.

“I want to say that it’s really good news that the president seems to be taking the wall off the table in the negotiations we’re having on an appropriations bill this week,” Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer said. “It would remove the prospect of a needless fight over a poison pill proposal that members of both parties don’t support.”