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GOP Rep. Hurd says Trump is Being Manipulated by Putin
Texas congressman served in the CIA before getting into politics

Rep. Will Hurd, R-Texas, said President Donald Trump is being manipulated by Russian President Vladimir Putin. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican Rep. Will Hurd wrote in a New York Times op-ed that that President Donald Trump is participating in a disinformation campaign by Russian President Vladimir Putin.

The Texas Republican served as an undercover CIA officer before winning his first House race in 2014.

‘Worst Enemy’: Trump Warns Putin Even as Second Summit in Works
U.S. president breaks with predecessors, criticizes Fed over rate hike

President Donald Trump warned Vladimir Putin and criticized the media and Fed Chairman Jerome Powell in an interview with CNBC. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump continues to defend his Monday summit with Vladimir Putin and says he wants a second meeting soon — while also warning the Russian president he could become Putin’s “worst enemy.”

A day after his top spokeswoman announced Trump wants a follow-up summit in Washington this fall, the president said this of what would be a controversial visit by the Russian strongman who U.S. intelligence officials say led an interference operation in the 2016 presidential election: “I would say it’s in the works.”

Former DC Interns Share How They Got Their Feet in the Door
Meet four interns who entered the political world through programs

Vashti Hinton applied to 30 Hill offices before landing a full-time position working for Rep. Gregory Meeks, D-N.Y. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Capitol Hill interns are often assumed to be college students with a natural political network. They’ve got an “in” in D.C. or they have — a word most people hate — “connections.”

But for the thousands of interns who flock to the Hill and Washington over the summer, who you know isn’t the only path to the nation’s capital. There are a number of programs that help them get a foot in the political door.

How to Eat Like an Intern
This reporter tried to eat, and do activities, for free over a week on the Hill and it wasn’t easy

Rep. Brett Guthrie, R-Ky., eats a corn dog during the American Meat Institute’s annual Hot Dog Lunch in the Rayburn courtyard on July 18. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Full disclosure: I’ve never interned on the Hill. But I have been an unpaid intern, and most people you meet in Washington have too.

Without a chunk of money in the bank, how do interns get by? 

Patrick Morrisey Using New York City Fundraiser to Help Retire Primary Debt
West Virginia GOP Senate candidate lags in cash on hand for general election

West Virginia Republican Patrick Morrisey is having a fundraiser with Donald Trump Jr. in New York City on Monday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

West Virginia Republican Patrick Morrisey is having a fundraiser Monday in New York City with Donald Trump Jr. to help retire the campaign debt from his successful Senate primary run. 

Morrisey, the state’s attorney general, is challenging Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin III, who’s led in recent polling and had a significant cash on hand advantage at the end of the second quarter. Inside Elections with Nathan L. Gonzales rates the race Tilts Democratic

Clarke Knows the ‘Tricks of the Trade’ From Her Internship
New York Democrat interned in the mid-1980s for her predecessor

Rep. Yvette D. Clarke, D-N.Y., got to work on trade issues affecting the Caribbean region during her Hill internship. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Former New York Rep. Major R. Owens may not have known he had an intern who was going places when he assigned college student Yvette D. Clarke to work on trade legislation in the mid-1980s.

Clarke was studying government and public policy at Oberlin College and was eager to learn more about the mechanics of Congress. About two decades later, she ended up challenging Owens in a 2004 Democratic primary — and lost. When Owens retired two years later, Clarke ran again — and won.

Opinion: I Listen to My Foster Youth Interns. They Deserve to Be Heard
Internships can be much more than answering phone calls and giving Capitol tours

Congressional interns may learn something on the Hill, but they’re also there to teach, Lawrence writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As co-chair of the Congressional Foster Youth Caucus, I am passionate about our foster youth — encouraging them, believing in them, and supporting their needs. In Congress, I have joined my colleagues in pushing for more resources and better programs to support one of our nation’s most vulnerable populations: our foster youth.

They deserve our support, they deserve our sincere efforts, and most of all they deserve to be heard.

Staffers on What They Wish They Had Done as Interns
Getting paid was the most common response

Staffers who were former staffers were asked what they would do differently if they got a do-over. (Bill Clark/ CQ Roll Call file photo)

Grab your Jefferson’s Manual and break our your thank you cards. It’s time to talk regrets. 

Lots of D.C. interns finish out the summer wishing they’d done more. 

Survey: Family Paid Rent for a Third of Former Interns
Roll Call surveyed congressional staffers about their cost of living when they were interns

The high cost of living in D.C. causes many Capitol Hill interns to find other ways to make ends meet — like taking a part-time job or going into debt. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When a new batch of interns descends on D.C., they land in the middle of the city’s housing market. And to borrow a line from a perennial candidate from New York: The rent is too damn high.

Roll Call surveyed congressional staffers to ask about the logistics of being an intern. The high cost of living in D.C. caused many interns to find other ways to make ends meet — like taking a part-time job or going into debt.

Senate Schedule for Next Week: VA Nominee and Appropriations

Senators are expected to continue meeting with Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, seen here heading to a meeting with Sen. Dean Heller. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate wrapped up its legislative business for the week on Thursday afternoon after ditching a vote on judicial nominee Ryan Bounds, whose nomination was subsequently withdrawn altogether by the White House, and a resolution disapproving of any attempts to make U.S. citizens available to Russian interrogators

The Senate will next convene at 3 p.m. on Monday, July 23, 2018. Following leader remarks, the Senate will proceed to executive session to consider the nomination of Robert L. Wilkie to be secretary of Veterans Affairs.