Maxine Waters

Waters Makes Surprise Appearance at MTV Awards
Presents award to ‘Hidden Figures’ for Best Fight Against the System movie

Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., and actor Tracee Ellis Ross speak during the 2017 MTV Movie And TV Awards in Los Angeles on Sunday. (Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

California Rep. Maxine Waters called on artists to be socially active in a surprise appearance at the MTV Movie and TV Awards on Sunday.

“Artists, actors, singers and citizens have a unique opportunity — the ability to speak out and inspire change,” she said.

Photos of the Recess: A Tax Protest, Special Election and 4/20 Event
The weeks of April 10 and April 17 as seen by Roll Call's photographers

A Hill staffer reads a book during the lunch hour on the East Lawn of the Capitol on April 18. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Warm weather punctuated the spring recess in Washington. As congressmen took two weeks back home in their states and districts, some Hill staffers were able to enjoy the sun on lunch breaks and head early to happy hours.

But it wasn't all that quiet on the congressional front. A Tax March on Saturday, April 15 brought protesters to Capitol Hill to demand President Donald Trump release his tax returns. CQ Roll Call hit the road to Atlanta for the special election to fill Tom Price's seat. And back in Washington, the recess neared its end as a 4/20 event resulted in seven arrests for marijuana possession and possession with intent to distribute near the Dirksen Senate Office Building.

Protesters in D.C. Demand Trump Release His Tax Returns
April 15 event on the National Mall coincides with others across U.S.

People gather for the Tax March on the West Lawn of the Capitol to call on President Donald Trump to release his tax returns on Saturday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As Tax Day approaches on Tuesday, April 18, protesters organized a Saturday demonstration in front of the Capitol to demand that President Donald Trump release his tax returns.

He’s the first president in nearly 40 years to not disclose such information. Similar protests were held across the country.

Word on the Hill: Congressional Dinner
Television safeguard awards and singer and athlete in D.C.

MSNBC host Greta Van Susteren will emcee Wednesday night’s Congressional Correspondents Dinner. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The day after President Donald Trump, an outspoken critic of the media, gave his joint session address to Congress, members of Congress and the media are getting together.

The annual Congressional Correspondents Dinner is tonight, when the media invites sources and politicians to be their guests for the event.

Hensarling’s Offensive on Dodd-Frank Seen as Negotiating Move
Texas Republican’s new bill strips much more of CFPB’s authority

Texas Rep. Jeb Hensarling was considered by President Donald Trump for the Treasury secretary position. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Financial Services Chairman Jeb Hensarling appears to be doubling down on his Dodd-Frank repeal legislation, adding more features objectionable to Democrats in the wake of a White House announcement of a four-month review of the nation’s financial laws and regulations. 

In a staff memo circulated last week, Hensarling filled five single-spaced pages with changes to a bill approved by his committee in September 2016 over the opposition of every Democrat and one Republican. Among other things, the Texas Republican’s new bill would strip much more of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s authority than last year’s version.

House Democrats Go to the Mat for Dodd-Frank
Minority party questions whether Trump would benefit from gutting law

Maxine Waters is helping lead the defense of Dodd-Frank. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

With their Senate colleagues on the front lines of opposing President Donald Trump’s Cabinet nominations, House Democrats are digging in for an extended fight over the president’s executive actions, in particular his targeting of the Dodd-Frank financial regulation law.

Starting over the weekend and continuing into Monday, House Democrats are defending a statute they say is key to protecting Main Street from Wall Street excesses.

Black History Month: Cedric Richmond on the ‘Work to Do’ Ahead
CBC chairman says promises of King, Chisholm haven’t yet been fulfilled

Louisiana Rep. Cedric L. Richmond speaks with New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker after the two, along with Georgia Rep. John Lewis, testified last month against the nomination of Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions to be attorney general on the grounds of his civil rights history. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

For Congressional Black Caucus Chairman Cedric L. Richmond, this month is about teaching. First celebrated in 1926 as a weeklong tribute to black history and culture and expanded to a monthlong honor in 1976, Black History Month is a time of reflection and festivity for many African-Americans. Roll Call interviewed Richmond and several other lawmakers and Capitol Hill figures, such as Senate Chaplain Barry C. Black, to find out what the intersection of black history and life in Congress and the Capitol building itself means to them.

Watch interviews and the video, “Black History and America's Capitol,” which combines all these talks, at rollcall.com/black-history-month. Richmond’s full discussion with Roll Call is below.

Trump Election Is Made Official Over Scattered Objections
House Democrats object to Electoral College results, but senators remain mum

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, top right, reacts as Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., top left, puts down an objection by a Democratic House member to the Electoral College count, during a joint session of Congress to tally the electoral ballots for U.S. president and vice president on Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

For Donald Trump, all that’s left is the oath of office — and, likely, many tweets.

House Democratic efforts to challenge the electoral process failed Friday when no senators joined the objections as Congress certified Trump’s Electoral College victory.

Battle Lines Form Over Popular Mortgage Interest Deduction
Homebuilders, lenders concerned by parts of Trump’s tax plan

House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady of Texas, seen holding a “Make America Great Again” hat after a GOP conference meeting in November, says there is no need to cap popular deductions to offset the cost of tax rate cuts. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Homebuilders and lenders are preparing to defend the mortgage interest deduction as the incoming Trump administration and Congress weigh potential adjustments to one of the most popular tax sweeteners.

Treasury Secretary-designee Steven Mnuchin last week raised eyebrows on Capitol Hill and drew scrutiny from business advocates by pointing to potential curbs on the mortgage interest deduction in a CNBC interview.

Liberal Lawmakers Try to Shame Wall Street to Denounce Bannon
Warren, Brown, Waters and Ellison pen letter to financial services groups

Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown was one of four Democrats to send a letter to financial services industry leaders asking them to denounce Stephen Bannon’s appointment to the Trump administration. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Some influential liberal lawmakers are calling on Wall Street to denounce the appointment of Stephen Bannon to President-elect Donald Trump’s administration.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown, and Reps. Maxine Waters of California and Keith Ellison of Minnesota, all Democrats, sent a letter to the leaders of various financial services industry groups, calling on them to “speak out.”