Massachusetts

Opinion: Trump Needs to Reread ‘The Art of the Comeback’
The president’s political embrace and his threats are both equally empty

President Donald Trump waves to the crowd after addressing a joint session of Congress in the Capitol's House Chamber, February 28, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

After just nine weeks in the Oval Office, Donald Trump is already forced to resort to his third book, “The Art of the Comeback.”

From James Comey’s artfully cloaked shiv in last Monday’s congressional testimony to the head-for-the-lifeboats abandonment of Trumpcare on Friday, it is hard to recall a president who has had a worse week without someone being indicted.

Democrats Delight in GOP Health Care Defeat
Pelosi says party is glad to own 2010 health law

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, left, and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, right, welcomed the decision by Republican leadership to pull the health care bill from the House floor. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Cheers went out from the Democratic cloakroom Friday when the news broke that Republicans were pulling their health care bill from the floor, and Democrats on the floor chanted “vote! vote!” as the majority lacked the votes opted to pass it. 

The minority party was more subdued at a press conference afterward, but House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and her leadership team still delighted in their victory.

The Supreme Court Confirmation Battle That Began 30 Years Ago
Three senators on Judiciary panel weathered watershed 1987 fight

Judge Robert Bork, nominated by President Ronald Reagan to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court, is sworn before the Senate Judiciary Committee at his confirmation hearing in September 1987. (John Duricka/AP File Photo)

In one of the more striking moments from the Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch this week, Sen. Charles E. Grassley offered this advice:

Don’t answer every question.

Appreciation | Jimmy Breslin and the Art of Describing Washington
Book by New York newspaperman is an invaluable portrayal of Capitol Hill

Jimmy Breslin found his muse in the late Massachusetts Democrat Tip O’Neill, above, whom he portrayed in his book “How the Good Guys Finally Won” as a consummate professional. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Jimmy Breslin will always be remembered as a New York newspaperman. But he also made an indelible contribution to documenting the Watergate scandal and in doing so, breathed life into some of Capitol Hill’s most influential characters. 

The hard-boiled columnist, who died March 19 at the age of 88, brought the full force of his observational skills to his 1975 book “How the Good Guys Finally Won.” Breslin made a career out of focusing on big stories through the perspective of working stiffs, so it’s no surprise he latched on to two methodical House Democrats who took on President Richard Nixon, fresh off a landslide 1972 re-election victory and whose team seemed to be brushing off the Watergate break-in.

Word on the Hill: Lawmakers Ball Up
The ‘Egyptian Jon Stewart’ and staffer shuffle

Indiana Rep. André Carson greets California Rep. Jeff Denham before the 2013 Home Court charity basketball game at Trinity Washington University. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Home Court charity basketball game when the Hill’s Angels, made up of members of Congress, take on Georgetown Law faculty and staff, a.k.a. the Hoya Lawyas, is tonight.

It’s the 30th annual matchup, which raises money for The Washington Legal Clinic for the Homeless. Tickets are $15.

Obama Vet Joins Push for Public Servants in Congress
David Heifetz is the chief communications officer at New Politics

New Politics backed Democrat Seth Moulton, left, of Massachusetts, and Wisconsin Republican Mike Gallagher in their congressional races last year. Both served in the Marine Corps. (Bill Clark/Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photos)

David Heifetz cleaned out his desk at the White House Office of Public Engagement and Intergovernmental Affairs in January and joined the effort to get public servants elected to office.

Heifetz, 28, who had written speeches for former President Barack Obama’s senior adviser Valerie Jarrett since August 2015, is now the chief communications officer of New Politics, a nonprofit that recruits and consults with candidates from public service backgrounds to run for public office.

DSCC Raises $3.8 Million in February, With Digital Boost
The committee sees successful grassroots digital campaign

Sen. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., is the DSCC chairman. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee raised $3.8 million in the month of February, according to figures provided first to Roll Call.

The committee noted February was particularly successful month for email and online donations. The DSCC currently has $7.7 million in cash on hand.

Kennedy Intern Hopes Her Story Is a Factor in Health Care Debate
Jen Fox credits law with helping her overcome Hodgkin’s lymphoma twice

Jen Fox speaks of her battle with Hodgkin’s lymphoma as her boss Massachusetts Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy III listens. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

During a markup in the House Energy and Commerce Committee for the Republican bill to replace President Barack Obama’s 2010 health care law, Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy III criticized the legislation by saying it was not an act of mercy but rather “an act of malice.”

Jen Fox, 25, one of the Massachusetts Democrat’s interns, was there for part of the 24 hours that the bill was being dissected. She said she wouldn’t have been, if not for the 2010 law.

Warren Taps Reid Aide Orthman as Senior Political Adviser
Massachusetts native will work for home state senator

Kristen Orthman, right, will be a senior adviser to Sen. Elizabeth Warren. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Elizabeth Warren has brought on a top leadership aide to Sen. Harry Reid as a senior adviser to her political operation.

Kristen Orthman, who hails from the Boston suburbs, will be going to work for the Massachusetts Democrat after a run as communications director in the retired Nevada senator’s leadership office, as well as a senior adviser to the Nevada State Democratic Party ahead of the 2016 campaign cycle.

Word on the Hill: D.C. and Guns
Save the date for Dine Out Day

Cherry blossoms were covered with ice on the East Front of the Capitol after snow and freezing rain fell over the region on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

With gun sales on the decline in the U.S. since President Donald Trump took office, WalletHub conducted a study to find out which states were the most dependent on the gun industry.

The District of Columbia topped the list for highest average wages and benefits in the firearms industry at $348,325. That’s more than 10 times higher than New Mexico, which came in last at $34,232.