Martin Heinrich

In Tax Return Secrecy, Congress Unites
What some lawmakers said when we asked for copies of their returns

Only 37 of 532 members of Congress responded when Roll Call asked for copies of their tax returns. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

No matter what their political affiliation, members of Congress have this in common: They don’t like releasing their tax returns. Only 37 of the 532 members of the House and Senate responded when Roll Call asked for copies of their tax returns over several weeks, starting in April. Most of them declined to release their tax returns.

Here are some of their responses.

Word on the Hill: Happy Birthday, Dianne Feinstein!
‘Game of Thrones’ and Japanese agriculture

California Sen. Dianne Feinstein arrives at the Capitol for the Senate Democrats’ policy lunch in May. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s Dianne Feinstein’s birthday. The oldest currently serving senator turns 84 today. The California Democrat has been in the Senate since 1992.

Feinstein also happens to share a birthday with other powerful Democrats in Congress: Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts turns 68 today.

Media Swarm Accompanies Sessions Testimony
Intelligence hearing came amid dispute about access for TV cameras

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., ranking member on the Senate Rules Committee, pushed back hard on the Rules Committee directive restricting press access on a busy day on Capitol Hill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

When Attorney General Jeff Sessions finished testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee shortly after 5 p.m. Tuesday, members of the committee faced swarms of television cameras and boom microphones outside the front and rear of the hearing room.

Some senators left quickly, but others faced the barrage of media. Republican Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, for instance, held court in an extended interview that featured correspondents from both CNN and NBC.

Sessions Declines to Testify About Any Conversations With Trump About Russia
Says potential exists for an executive privilege claim that has not happened

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is greeted by Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C.), right, and Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., before his testimony on Tuesday. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

BY JOHN T. BENNETT AND NIELS LESNIEWSKI, CQ ROLL CALL

Attorney General Jeff Sessions declined to answer questions Tuesday about conversations with President Donald Trump, citing the potential that the White House could assert executive privilege — which has not yet happened.

Say What? Senators' Questions for Comey, a Roll Call Analysis
Trump's attempted influence on FBI investigations topped the list

BY SEAN MCMINN AND RYAN KELLY

Republicans did not shy away from surfacing the issue of the president’s potential obstruction of justice during former FBI Director James B. Comey's appearance on Capitol Hill on Thursday.

Here Are the 8 Republicans and 7 Democrats Questioning Comey
John McCain and other ex-officio members could make special appearance

Former FBI Director James B. Comey will testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

James B. Comey is undeniably the star of the show Thursday, when he comes to the main hearing room in the Hart Senate Office Building for his first public testimony since President Donald Trump fired him as FBI director a month ago. But the eight Republican and seven Democratic senators on the Select Intelligence Committee have highly important roles.

That’s because their questioning will go a long way to shaping whether the national television audience views the congressional investigation of Russian meddling in last year’s election as thorough and serious — or just more partisan posturing.

Senate LGBT Staff Group Provides Bipartisan Professional Development
GLASS caucus prioritizes being a safe space for its members

The Senate GLASS Caucus board. Back row left to right: Robert Curis, Mario Semiglia, Trelaine Ito, Russell Page. Front row left to right: Peter Narby, Tré Easton, Caitlin Hart, Andrew Shine, Michelle Mittler. (Photo courtesy of the Senate GLASS Caucus)

The Senate GLASS Caucus was created to provide a safe space for staffers on Capitol Hill who might still feel uncomfortable about being openly gay in their offices.

The caucus’ co-chairmen this year are Caitlin Hart, legislative correspondent for Florida Democrat Bill Nelson, and Andrew Shine, legislative correspondent for Delaware Democrat Thomas R. Carper.

Senate Intelligence Leaders Stress Bipartisanship in Russia Probe
Burr admits he voted for Trump, but emphasizes how big the moment is

Senate Intelligence Chairman Richard M. Burr and Vice Chairman Mark Warner hold a news conference Wednesday to provide an update on the panel’s investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Last week’s Supreme Court nomination hearings for Judge Neil Gorsuch likely weren't the most interesting Senate business on the second floor of the Hart Office Building.

That’s where the Senate Intelligence Committee conducts its meetings in a secure facility just around the corner from where the Judiciary Committee was meeting.

Udall, Heinrich Ask Obama to Intervene in Pipeline Protests
New Mexico senators concerned about increased violence at protests over Dakota Access pipeline

Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M., wrote a letter to President Barack Obama urging him to take action to peacefully resolve the escalating violence occurring between law makers and protestors over the Dakota Access Pipeline. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

U.S. New Mexico Sens. Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich appealed Wednesday to President Barack Obama to take action to protect the safety of demonstrators protesting the Dakota Access pipeline.  

Udall and Heinrich each wrote to the president citing examples of violence in North Dakota against Standing Rock Sioux Tribe members and demonstrators camping in the area, The Albuquerque Journal reported. 

Sources: White House Angling for ‘Clean‘ Renewal of Iran Sanctions
Administration has stopped short of veto threat as House vote looms

Secretary of State John Kerry, left, takes a seat across from Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif in January in Vienna, before a meeting about the implementation of a deal focused on Iran’s nuclear program. (Courtesy State Department via Flickr)

The House plans to vote to renew expiring sanctions on Iran without adding provisions the White House would likely find objectionable, and sources say President Barack Obama is likely to let such a “clean” bill become law.

At issue is the Iran Sanctions Act of 1996, which targets the nation’s energy sector and is due to expire Dec. 31. The White House says the president and Treasury Department already possess the sanctions-issuing authorities that the law grants. But Obama likely would not veto a “clean” renewal because administration officials have concluded it would not violate the terms of the nuclear deal the U.S. and other world powers brokered with Tehran last year, according to a source with knowledge of the White House’s deliberations.