Marsha Blackburn

Lawmakers Seek to Restore Internet Privacy After Repealing It
Move comes after waves of consumer concerns

Legislation by Tennessee Rep. Marsha Blackburn would restore some of the internet regulations Republicans in Congress just repealed. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

House and Senate lawmakers are hoping to push legislation to replace recently repealed Obama-era internet privacy regulations, a move by the Federal Communications Commission that has led to a tide of consumer complaints.

At least two Senate bills are being drafted to address the regulatory void and public outcry created last month when congressional Republicans repealed internet privacy rules issued by the FCC last year, using the Congressional Review Act. With the repeal, internet service providers such as Comcast and Verizon can use and sell their customers’ online internet activity for marketing purposes unless consumers specifically request to opt out.

Republicans Face Wrath Over Health Care Vote
Though many skipped town hall meetings, they couldn’t escape the fury

Rep. Jeff Denham, R-Calif., talks with constituents during a "Coffee and Conversation" at the Riverbank Teen Center on Tuesday. Dozen of constituents attended the meeting to voice concerns over his vote on the Republican health care bill in the House last week. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Republican lawmakers across the country have faced crowds of angry constituents after they returned home to try to justify their votes on the Republican health care bill last week. 

Democrat-aligned groups have promised to to try to make House members who voted for the Republican health care bill, called the American Health Care Act, regret their vote. And opponents of the bill are attempting to show their ire over provisions they say will cut coverage, especially for those with pre-existing conditions.

Word on the Hill: Golf Day on Capitol Hill
Free pretzels and shuffling staffers

It's National Golf Day. Here is Florida Rep. Tom Rooney teeing off as Tennessee Rep. Jim Cooper, California Rep. Duncan Hunter and Pennsylvania Rep. Mike Doyle watch during the First Tee Congressional Challenge golf tournament in 2015. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s National Golf Day, which means golf industry leaders and PGA Tour winner Billy Hurley III will be on Capitol Hill.

A coalition of golf’s leading organizations, known as WE ARE GOLF, is scheduled to meet with members of Congress to discuss the sports economy and impact.

Key Conservatives Come Around on GOP Health Plan
Republican Study Committee leaders sign off, but Freedom Caucus still wary

Walker and several members of the Republican Study Committee voiced their support for the GOP health plan. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

By JOHN T. BENNETT And LINDSEY McPHERSON, CQ ROLL CALL

Several key Republicans on Friday endorsed the health care overhaul bill crafted by GOP leaders and the White House, saying President Donald Trump had agreed to changes they favored minutes earlier during an Oval Office meeting. With a vote on the so-called American Health Care Act scheduled for this coming Thursday in the House, the news was welcomed by supporters of repealing and replacing the 2010 health care law.

Women’s History Month Update on a Women’s Museum
Advocates say they are ‘closer than ever’ to making museum a reality

Joan Wages, left, and Susan Whiting are shown at a brunch for the the National Women’s History Museum in 2015. (Courtesy National Women’s History Museum)

Here is your Women’s History Month reminder that a National Women’s History Museum for the National Mall is still in the works. 

Just more than 20 years since the organization to build the museum was founded, there is a congressional commission to study its creation and a team of people ready to follow through if it gets greenlighted.

Inexperience Weakens Congress and the White House
A younger, less experienced Congress tackles some old and knotty issues

From left, President Donald Trump, House Speaker Paul Ryan, and Vice President Mike Pence talk as the president finishes his speech at the Republican congressional retreat in Philadelphia on Jan. 26. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo/Pool)

For the first time in U.S. history, we have a president with no government experience. And he’s looking to work with a Congress that has lost members with significant legislative prowess on some issues in recent years.

President Donald Trump’s administration started off with a flurry of executive actions, reportedly without consulting Congress and some members of his own Cabinet. The episodes had one senior lawmaker shaking his head.

Democratic Lawmakers Feel Boost from Women’s March
Minority party hopes movement will help Congress rein in Trump

Protesters march down Independence Avenue in Washington, holding signs during the women’s march on Saturday, the day after the inauguration of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Capitol Dome was more than just a symbolic backdrop for Saturday’s Women’s March on Washington. It was the intended target of hundreds of thousands of voices of frustration with President Donald Trump. 

For all of the anti-Trump placards — both crude and shrewd — many marchers descended on the nation’s capital to send a message to the branch of government that, they hope, will be a check on the new president.

Republican Gender Gap Could Grow in the House
Ideology, not gender, is often driving factor in open primaries

Reps. Ann Wagner of Missouri, right, and Jackie Walorski of Indiana could both run for higher office in 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans will be down one woman next year. And with administration picks forthcoming and a handful of female members weighing runs for other offices, the party’s gender gap could grow. 

With their largest majority in more than 80 years, Republicans were mostly on defense in 2016. 

Ryan, Praised for Inclusiveness, Faces Hurdles Seeking Another Speaker Term
Conservatives say they'll weigh elections results, lame-duck action

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan touts the House Republican policy agenda after a GOP conference meeting in September. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Paul D. Ryan’s first as year as House speaker played out like a roller coaster. But despite the rocky ride, the Wisconsin Republican reaches his one-year anniversary Oct. 29 earning relatively high marks from many in his caucus.

Praised for bringing a more inclusive leadership style to the fractious House GOP conference, Ryan, 46, is widely expected to seek another term as speaker during the upcoming lame-duck session, despite talk of opposition from more conservative lawmakers and grousing from some of the Republican faithful about his contortions over Donald Trump's presidential bid.

Democrats Protest Fetal Tissue Report
Walk out of investigative panel formed in the aftermath of Planned Parenthood video controversy

House Democrats on Wednesday walked out of a meeting of a congressional investigative panel launched in the aftermath of the controversy over Planned Parenthood's abortion practices, charging the proceedings amounted to a "witch hunt."

The meeting of the Select Investigative Panel on Infant Lives was to consider a report recommending that the biotech company StemExpress LLC and its founder Catherine Spears Dyer be held in contempt for refusing to comply to subpoenas seeking accounting records relating to research of fetal tissue.