Mark Warner

At Trump White House, One Russia Controversy Breeds Another
What did POTUS mean? No one is sure, but he declares Putin summit a ‘success’

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., center, was among those who were confused by the president’s statements about Russia on Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Trump White House on Wednesday returned to a familiar pattern, fighting through multiple self-imposed controversies and confusing even its own allies.

President Donald Trump didn’t personally walk anything back, unlike on Tuesday. He left the mopping up to his top spokeswoman a day after he — in a rare move — admitted a mistake by amending one word of a 45-minute Finland press conference with Vladimir Putin that rattled both Democratic and Republican lawmakers.

Senators Eye New Russia Sanctions as Trump Defends Putin Summit
Corker on GOP unity with Trump: 'It feels like the dam is breaking'

Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Bob Corker says a few senators are crafting a resolution to call out President Donald Trump’s Helsinki performance, but he acknowledged such measures “don’t do anything.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As some senators discuss slapping new sanctions on Moscow, President Donald Trump is defending his widely panned summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin, tweeting he had a “great” meeting with NATO allies but an “even better” one with the Russian president.

While Trump and his team recover from a turbulent weeklong European swing in which the president attacked longtime American allies and dismissed the consensus findings of the U.S. intelligence community, one Republican senator said he senses GOP lawmakers’ insistence on standing by Trump no matter what could be weakening.

Lawmakers Drop the D-Word After Trump and Putin Meet
What do Elizabeth Warren, John McCain and Donald Trump have in common? They all love the word ‘disgrace’

Sen. Elizabeth Warren holds a news conference in the Capitol in March. The Massachusetts Democrat joined other lawmakers in calling President Donald Trump's meeting with President Vladimir Putin "disgraceful." (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Witch hunt,” “collusion” and “13 angry Democrats” — the Justice Department’s investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 election has spawned its very own vocabulary.

Monday saw another strong contender: the D-word.

Lawmakers Condemn Trump Over News Conference With Putin
Republican calls it ‘shameful’ while Democrat says trip was ‘one giant middle finger... to his own country’

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive at Helsinki International Airport on Sunday ahead of Trump’s meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

As President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin left their joint press conference in Monday in Helsinki, Finland, to continue with their slate of meetings, lawmakers back home in Washington sent a resounding rebuke across the Atlantic to the president.

Perhaps loudest in his criticism of Trump was one of the most prominent members of his own party: Arizona Sen. John McCain.

Top Democrats Warn Intelligence Director About Sharing Secrets With Other Members of Congress
Letter to Dan Coats does not discuss specifics of intelligence in question

Rep. Adam B. Schiff was among the signatories on a Thursday letter critical of DNI Dan Coats. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democratic members of the group of lawmakers with access to particularly sensitive intelligence information expressed concern Thursday about broader dissemination — to other members of Congress.

The July 12 letter directed to Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats was publicly released on Friday.

DHS: Russia Not Targeting Election Systems Like 2016
No evidence of a robust campaign aimed at tampering with midterms

DHS official Christopher Krebs says he has yet to see a robust election tampering effort aimed at the midterms. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

U.S. intelligence agencies and the Department of Homeland Security are not seeing evidence so far of a concerted effort by Russia to hack or penetrate American election systems during the 2018 midterms, top Homeland Security officials told lawmakers Wednesday.

Although the 2018 “midterms remain a potential target for Russian actors,” the intelligence community has yet to see evidence of a robust campaign aimed at tampering with our election infrastructure along the lines of 2016 or influencing the makeup of the House or Senate races, Christopher Krebs, the top DHS official overseeing cybersecurity and elections security, told the House Homeland Security Committee.

Senate Probe Continues to Back Up Intelligence on Trump-Russia
Latest update affirms ‘sound’ conclusions of the intelligence community

Senate Intelligence Chairman Richard M. Burr and Vice Chairman Mark Warner released their latest findings on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate Intelligence Committee continues to back up the findings of the intelligence community about Russia’s efforts to meddle in the 2016 presidential election, according to a new update.

In a new document on the panel’s progress, the Intelligence Committee also said it would release its review of the U.S. government’s handling of the so-called “Dossier” in a future part of its investigation.

Funding for National Parks Gaining Momentum
GOP Senators with competing bills reach a compromise

Parts of a bill from Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, was included in a compromise bill that would fund national park maintenance. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican senators with competing bills to tackle the National Park Service’s $12 billion deferred maintenance backlog, which has been identified as a top priority for the Trump administration, reached a compromise Friday on a single measure.

The bill from Sens. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, and Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., takes pieces from each of the senators’ previous bills to create a new trust fund to pay for national park improvements with revenue from energy production on federal lands.

War Over FBI and Justice Reaches Crescendo on Hill
Divided House passes resolution demanding surveillance documents by July 6

The House passed a resolution by Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., aimed at the Justice Department on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Partisan clashes over the Justice Department and the FBI intensified Thursday as the House passed a resolution 226-183 demanding that Justice leaders turn over thousands of pages of investigative documents pertaining to the investigation of Carter Page and other former aides to President Donald Trump’s campaign. 

The House resolution insists that the Justice Department by July 6 comply with document requests and subpoenas issued by the Intelligence and Judiciary committees regarding potential violations of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act by department personnel during the FBI’s investigation of Russian influence in the 2016 presidential campaign.

Crowley Loss Creates Open Field for Next Generation of Democratic Leaders
Plenty of options, but who wants to — and who’s ready to — step up?

From left, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, Rhode Island Rep. David Cicilline, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Maryland Sen. Chris Van Hollen, New York Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, New Mexico Rep. Ben Ray Luján, Virginia Sen. Mark Warner and Illinois Rep. Cheri Bustos attend a rally in Berryville, Va., in July 2017. The event featured a wide swath of Democratic leaders from both chambers. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

“Not so fast. Not so fast.”

That was House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi’s initial response — albeit a joking one — Wednesday morning to a reporter who pointed out that “at some point” the California Democrat and her top two lieutenants will no longer be in Congress.