Mark Warner

Trump Orders Declassification of Carter Page FBI Documents
Action follows request from House Republicans

President Donald Trump addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference at the Gaylord National Resort in Oxon Hill, Md., on February 23, 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump on Monday ordered the immediate declassification of redacted materials in the FBI’s 2017 application to spy on Carter Page, as well as various FBI reports of interviews related to that matter including ones conducted with DOJ official Bruce Ohr.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders announced the decision in a statement Monday noting Trump’s decision comes “at the request of a number of committees of Congress, and for reasons of transparency.”

Senators Cheer Trump Order on Election Meddling, but Want More Action
Democrats, especially, are skeptical of president’s commitment

Banking Chairman Michael D. Crapo and ranking Democrat Sherrod Brown have been holding a series of hearings on Russia sanctions. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senators are pleased to see the Trump administration doing something about election interference, but they don’t think Wednesday’s executive order will be enough.

Some of the concern comes from the fact that even if federal agencies report evidence of Russian evidence to interfere in the 2018 midterms, President Donald Trump could still waive the imposition of sanctions.

Richard Burr Praises Expected Trump Order on Election Interference
Confirms Intelligence Committee report on Russian meddling won’t come before November

Intelligence Chairman Richard M. Burr. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee seemed to confirm Wednesday the existence of a forthcoming executive order to counter efforts of Russia and other foreign adversaries to interfere in U.S. elections.

Sen. Richard M. Burr pointed to the sanctions action during an interview on Fox News.

Senate Intel Won’t Have Russia Report By Midterms, Top Democrat Says
Committee still wants to speak with Cohen, Papadopoulos

Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C., right, and Vice Chairman Mark Warner, D-Va., have managed to keep Senate Intelligence working on a bipartisan basis as they probe Russia 2016 election interference. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate Intelligence Committee is unlikely to release its final report on Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election until after the midterms this November, Vice Chairman Mark Warner, the top Democrat on the committee, said.

Warner and his colleagues are still wending their way down a list of people they’d like to interview, he said, including Trump campaign foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos, who was sentenced to 14 days in prison last week for lying to the FBI about his contacts with the Russians while he was working on the campaign.

Photos of the Week: Back on the Hill Again
The week of Sept. 3 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh continued his testimony on Thursday before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

The week began with a solemn yet powerful tribute to Sen. John McCain at the Washington National Cathedral on Saturday before he was laid to rest on Sunday in Maryland at the Naval Academy.

On Tuesday, both chambers were back on the Hill and focus turned in the Senate to the three-day-long hearing for Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh, who sat for hours and hours of questioning on Wednesday and Thursday. The protests for this nominee were plentiful.

Republicans Have Questions for Twitter, and They’re Not About Election Meddling
When tech execs head to the Hill on Wednesday, Walden wants to talk about censorship

Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook COO, and Jack Dorsey, Twitter CEO, arrive to testify before a Senate hearing on Wednesday on the influence of foreign operations on social media. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The world’s largest social media companies are due Wednesday on Capitol Hill as lawmakers grapple with how to protect American voters from foreign influence operations and deal with charges that conservative views are being censored online.

First some top brass — Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey — will face questions from the Senate Intelligence panel, which is investigating Russian meddling in the 2016 election. While the panel had also invited Google co-founder and Alphabet CEO Larry Page, the search engine giant decided to send its chief legal officer instead. 

GOP Senator Critical of Report on Trump Involvement in FBI Project
Democrats continue to question real estate, ethics of president‘s involvement in site planning

Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., has questions about the scope of the GSA inspector general’s review of the FBI headquarters project. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Ron Johnson has questions about the process and methodology employed by an inspector general in reviewing President Donald Trump’s involvement in the FBI headquarters project.

The Wisconsin Republican outlined a series of questions about the scope of the General Services Administration review.

Donald Trump Googled Himself and Didn’t Like What He Saw
Tech firms have ‘RIGGED’ search results against him, president alleges

President Donald Trump lashed out at technology firms, singling out Google for what he says is biased search results intended to hurt him. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump went after technology firms Tuesday morning, singling out Google by alleging its search settings are biased against him.

He used a pair of morning tweets to, as he often does, paint himself and fellow conservatives as the victims of a liberal conspiracy. In this incarnation of what is a running Trump narrative, he used this search topic to make his point: “Trump News.”

Trade War Sends Lawmakers on Beer Crawl
Kaine, Warner, Perdue and others visit breweries to talk tariffs

Sen. David Perdue, R-Ga., spoke on tariffs at the Anheuser-Busch Brewery in Cartersville, Georgia, earlier this month. (Courtesy Sen. David Perdue’s office)

A number of members of Congress headed out to breweries this summer, but not to quietly enjoy a beer.

While some sampled the product while there, the lawmakers for the most part used the sites as backdrops to criticize the trade war that President Donald Trump launched with his tariffs on aluminum and steel imports.

Senate Panel Abruptly Cancels Markup of Election Security Bill
Anti-hacking measure would require paper ballots, post-election audits

Sen. Amy Klobuchar says she’s “disappointed” by the decision to postpone a markup of her election security bill, which had bipartisan support from both Republicans and Democrats like Sen. Mark Warner. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A Senate committee on Wednesday abruptly postponed the planned markup of a key election security bill that had bipartisan support and would have imposed new audit requirements on states.

The markup of the Secure Elections Act, authored by Oklahoma Republican James Lankford and Minnesota Democrat Amy Klobuchar, is “postponed until further notice,” the Senate Rules and Administration Committee said on its website.