Mark Warner

Schiff Says Facebook Revelation Bolsters Case Against Russia
‘Troll farm’ linked to Russia paid for ads on Facebook, company tells investigators

Rep. Adam Schiff, the ranking minority member on the House Intelligence Committee, said while the amount spent on the ads in question is relatively small, millions of people were exposed to them. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Intelligence Committee ranking Democrat Rep. Adam B. Schiff said Wednesday that Facebook’s admission that it sold ads to a so-called Russian “troll farm” bolsters the case that Russia conducted a disinformation campaign in last year’s election.

Schiff made the statement on CNN after Facebook executives told congressional investigators Wednesday that it discovered it had sold about $100,000 worth of ads to a Russian entity with a history of spreading pro-Russian propaganda, which was first reported by the Washington Post.

Word on the Hill: Warner and Kaine Honor Police From Baseball Practice Shooting
Look out for dinos and learn procedure

Virginia Sens. Mark Warner, left, and Tim Kaine, right, pose with police officers at the Alexandria Police Department on Tuesday. (Courtesy Warner and Kaine’s offices)

Sens. Tim Kaine and Mark Warner spent some time in Alexandria, Virginia, on Tuesday night to honor the police officers who responded to the shooting at the congressional Republicans’ baseball practice in June.

They presented copies of a resolution adopted unanimously in the Senate in June to Alexandria Police Department officers. The resolution, led by Kaine and Warner and co-sponsored by the entire Senate, commended the department, Capitol Police and first responders for their heroism during the attack. It also recognized the survivors of the incident.

For Bobby Scott, a District Carved in Calm
Virginia Democrat takes business-as-usual approach, absent political rhetoric

Virginia Rep. Robert C. Scott speaks to attendees at a town hall in Norfolk on Monday. (D.A. Banks/CQ Roll Call)

NORFOLK, Va. — At a recent town hall here in Virginia’s second most populous city, Rep. Robert C. Scott patiently took questions from more than two dozen residents waiting in line. The queue stretched to the very back of a high school auditorium with some standing for the entire portion of the two-hour public meeting.

Absent was the rancor that has dominated town halls across the country this year — mostly those held by congressional Republicans facing angry crowds, upset over changes the GOP wants to make to the 2010 health care law and expressing steadfast opposition to Donald Trump’s presidency.

Trump Condemns White Supremacists Two Days After Charlottesville Violence
‘Racism is evil,’ president declares, while calling out KKK and similar groups

President Donald Trump — under pressure to explicitly condemn a weekend rally by white supremacists in Virginia that ended in bloodshed — denounced racism as "evil" Monday, singling out the Ku Klux Klan and neo-Nazis as "repugnant." (NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Under intense pressure from fellow Republicans, President Donald Trump on Monday forcefully condemned the Klu Klux Klan, neo-Nazis and white supremacist groups after refusing to do so for two days after racial violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The central Virginia city was the scene of a car attack by a Nazi sympathizer that left a counter-protester dead and 19 others injured during the second day of rallies organized by white nationalists trying to stop the removal of a statute of Confederate military commander Robert E. Lee. But in remarks Saturday, Trump criticized groups on “many sides” and his silence about the Nazi and white supremacist groups continued throughout Sunday and into the first half of Monday.

Podcast: What's the Spiel With Democrats' Better Deal?
The Big Story, Episode 64

From left, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., Rep. David Cicilline, D-R.I., Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., Rep. Ben Ray Lujan, D-N.M., Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., and Cheri Bustos, D-Ill., attend a rally with House and Senate Democrats to announce "A Better Deal" economic agenda. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Opinion: Democrats Cut the Cards in Search of a Better Deal
Sending a message to Joe Sixpack

From left, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, Rhode Island Rep. David Cicilline, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Maryland Sen. Chris Van Hollen, New York Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, New Mexico Rep. Ben Ray Luján, Virginia Sen. Mark Warner and Illinois Rep. Cheri Bustos at the congressional Democrats’ rally in Berryville, Va., on Monday to unveil their new economic agenda. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Under the bright sun in Berryville, Virginia, Monday afternoon, the congressional Democrats demonstrated that they can change. Or, at least, they can paper over their differences.

At the beginning of an hourlong rollout of their 2018 economic agenda, “A Better Deal,” Chuck Schumer labeled as a “false choice” the debate over “whether Democrats should spend all our energy focusing on the diverse Obama coalition or the blue-collar Americans in the heartland who voted for Trump.”

Democrats Mix Politics With Policy Rollout in Virginia
‘Better Deal’ agenda seeks to unite party factions

Congressional Democrats, led by Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, center, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, left, and Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Chairman Ben Ray Luján, right, rolled out their new agenda on Monday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By NIELS LESNIEWSKI and BRIDGET BOWMAN

BERRYVILLE, Va. — The visit by House and Senate Democrats to a rural Virginia county that voted for President Donald Trump wasn’t technically all about politics, but they were unavoidable.

Jared Kushner, After Intel Meeting, Denies Russia Impropriety
Trump son-in-law says no collusion with Kremlin during 2016 race

Jared Kushner, son-in-law and senior adviser to President Donald Trump, leaves the Hart Senate Office Building on Monday after his interview with the Senate Intelligence Committee staff. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

UPDATED 5:15 p.m. | Following nearly three hours of testimony before Senate Intelligence Committee staffers on Monday, senior presidential adviser Jared Kushner stood outside the White House and denied colluding with Russian officials during the 2016 campaign, saying all of his actions were both legal and proper.

President Donald Trump’s son-in-law defended himself during rare public remarks just outside the executive mansion’s West Wing, saying: “I did not collude with Russia, nor do I know of anyone else in the campaign who did so.”

Podcast: On Russia, Congress Looks at the Collusion Question
The Week Ahead, Episode 63

Capitol Hill will likely hear from three key figures in the Russia investigation this week, Donald Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, his son, Donald Trump Jr., and his former campaign manager, Paul Manafort. CQ Legal Affairs Reporter Todd Ruger previews what figure to be blockbuster hearings.

McCain Absence Gives GOP More Time to Win — Or Lose — Health Care Votes
Schedule change could put focus back on Russia

With Sen. John McCain recuperating at home in Arizona from surgery, Senate GOP leaders are delaying consideration of the health care bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

That Sen. John McCain’s absence from the Capitol this week led Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to delay consideration of a bill to roll back the 2010 health care law is a sign of just how narrow the vote margin might be.

And it could bring the focus back to the chamber’s various Russia investigations.