Mark Meadows

Barr: Mueller ‘did not establish’ Trump-Russia collusion, but obstruction questions remain
White House says AG’s summary of special counsel report exonerates president

Special counsel Robert Mueller walks with his wife Ann Mueller on March 24, 2019 in Washington, DC. Special counsel Robert Mueller has delivered his report on alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election to Attorney General William Barr. (Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

That assertion is, of course, the opposite of what Mueller wrote in his report, according to Barr’s summary.

“While this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him” from obstruction of justice charges, Mueller wrote.

Cummings won’t pursue perjury charges against Cohen ‘at this time’
Republicans on Oversight Committee wanted Justice Department to investigate whether Trump’s former attorney lied under oath

Michael Cohen, former attorney for President Donald Trump, testifies during a House Committee on Oversight and Reform hearing on Russian interference in the 2016 election in February. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Chairman Elijah Cummings of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform on Wednesday quashed any notion that he would refer Michael Cohen to the Justice Department for perjury.

Republicans on the oversight panel have claimed that the former personal lawyer for President Donald Trump committed perjury when he told the committee at a public hearing in February “I never asked for, nor would I accept” a pardon from Trump.

3 takeaways: Weekend reinforces that Trump is his own communications director
President spends weekend retweeting of conservative lawmakers, pundits after Bill Shine’s departure

Fox News Channel and radio talk show host Sean Hannity interviews President Donald Trump before a campaign rally at the Las Vegas Convention Center on Sept. 20. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

ANALYSIS — Bill Shine, the former Fox News executive, is no longer White House communications director. But President Donald Trump’s weekend messaging shows he might not need to fill the position.

Trump returned to the White House Sunday evening after a weekend at his South Florida resort without speaking to reporters. Several shouted questions about his new request that lawmakers give him $8.6 billion for his proposed U.S.-Mexico border barrier. A Roll Call reporter asked about Michael Cohen accusing the president of lying when he claimed his former fixer lied about not asking him for a pardon.

Top Republican releases Bruce Ohr’s transcript on dossier, Russia investigation
Ohr met with members of Congress last August to discuss his role feeding the FBI information on President Trump

Ranking member Doug Collins, R-Ga., arrives for the House Judiciary Committee markup of a resolution authorizing issuance of a subpoena to Acting Attorney General Matthew G. Whitaker on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The top Republican on the House Judiciary Committee released a transcript on Friday of congressional testimony from Justice Department official Bruce Ohr.

Ohr met with members of Congress last August to discuss his role feeding the FBI information about President Donald Trump and his 2016 campaign team’s ties to Russia that Ohr gathered from employees at the opposition research firm Fusion GPS.

The conservative House Freedom Caucus is launching a podcast series
Rep. Jody Hice, former conservative talk show host, will sit down to discuss policy and politics with HFC newsmakers

Rep. Jody Hice, R-Ga., will host a weekly podcast for the House Freedom Caucus. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The conservative House Freedom Caucus is launching a podcast series, marking the first time an organized group in Congress will host its own show.

Rep. Jody Hice of Georgia, a former conservative talk radio host and the Freedom Caucus’ communications chairman, will sit down weekly with other members of the caucus, senators and grassroots leaders.

A half-century after Selma, the ‘black friend’ defense is going strong
Too many Americans, like the Oscar-winning ‘Green Book,’ think racism can be solved by making an ‘exceptional’ black friend — as long as the family doesn’t move in next door

Rep. John Lewis stands on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala. The specter of partisan rancor — fueled in part by Mark Meadows’ performance at the Cohen hearings — hangs over this year’s commemoration of Bloody Sunday, Curtis writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — On a “Meet the Press” appearance a few weeks ago, Ohio Democrat and maybe presidential hopeful Sen. Sherrod Brown was commenting on that slam-bang start to Black History Month, Virginia officials in blackface, when he said, “This country hasn’t dealt well with issues of race. We have a president who’s a racist.” That led host Chuck Todd to ask Brown if he believed Donald Trump was a racist “in his heart,” to which Brown answered, “Well, I don’t know what ‘in his heart’ means.”

Exactly.

Photos of the week: A comedian, a fixer and a presidential snub
The week of Feb. 25 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Former Daily Show host Jon Stewart, center, and 9/11 responder John Feal, far right, walk through the Hart Building on Monday while visiting Senate offices to call on Congress to make permanent the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund. The fund provides financial assistance to responders, victims and their families who suffer from health maladies. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The week began with a bang, not whimper, on Capitol Hill, as comedian Jon Stewart made a cameo and the House delivered a pointed rebuke to President Donald Trump.

Cohen implicates Trump’s sons, Donald Jr. and Eric, in mistress hush money scheme
Trump’s former lawyer and fixer was asked if he is aware of any other illegal acts that haven’t come to light

Michael Cohen, former attorney for President Donald Trump, testifies to the House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

This is a developing story. Follow this page for updates on the latest from the Cohen hearing.

Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer, said Wednesday that Trump’s business operation is being investigated for illegal acts that haven’t yet been publicly disclosed.

The dead earmarks society
Congress gave up pork years ago. Now it could be making a comeback

Steny Hoyer says he’s working to restore congressionally directed spending, with “reforms to ensure transparency and accountability.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

From the outside, they looked like a collection of political misfits akin to the characters from “The Breakfast Club.” This peculiar little crew of lobbyists, ethics watchdogs and government spending hawks included the likes of Public Citizen’s Craig Holman and former House member-turned-lobbyist Jim Walsh.

Instead of serving Saturday detention, like the high schoolers of the 1985 hit movie, they spent their meetings nearly a decade ago seeking compromise on one of Congress’ most politically fraught but powerful tools: earmarks. “It was a strange group, an eclectic group,” concedes Holman, whose liberal Public Citizen is best known for taking on K Street, not working with the lobbyists and lawyers in the sector. “We identified what the real problem with earmarks is — and earmarks do pose a serious problem with corruption.”

Legal fight expected for Trump’s national emergency declaration
Experts predict high court will back his power to do so, but maybe not accessing military monies

President Donald Trump, here addressing reporters on Jan. 10, will sign a government shutdown-avoiding bill and declare a national emergency at the border to access Pentagon funds for his proposed southern border barrier. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump will declare a national emergency at the southern border to redirect military funds to his border wall project after lawmakers gave him $4.3 billion less than his $5.7 billion ask. But the move is expected to bring court fights that could sink his plan. 

A House-Senate conference committee could only agree to give the president just shy of $1.4 billion for the barrier project as conferees struck a deal needed to avert another partial government shutdown. The president — who earlier this week said he couldn’t say he was happy about the contents of the compromise — reluctantly agreed to sign it into law after the Senate and House sign off during floor votes Thursday.