Lobbying

How The GOP’s Health Care Law Went Down
A play-by-play of one of the most momentous days in Trump’s presidency

Speaker of the House Paul D. Ryan, R-Wisc., approaches the podium to make a statement and take questions from reporters after he pulled the Republican bill to partially repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act on Friday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It was a nail-biter of a day with a photo finish.

The Republican Party’s seven-year effort to repeal the 2010 health care law ended with a thud Friday when the GOP decided not to even subject its do-or-die alternative to a vote.

Whip List: Obamacare Rollback Vote Nears Breaking Point
A handful more GOP opponents would doom measure

House Freedom Caucus members, from left, Raúl R. Labrador of Idaho, Mark Meadows of North Carolina and Jim Jordan of Ohio make their way to a procedural vote in the Capitol on Friday before the vote on the Republican health care bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Enough Republicans appeared on the verge of voting against the House health care overhaul to require frantic lobbying and send House Speaker Paul D. Ryan to the White House as floor debate got underway Friday.

At least 20 House Republicans had already signaled opposition since the end of a Thursday evening huddle with top Trump administration officials in which Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney delivered an ultimatum, saying President Donald Trump was done negotiating on partially repealing and replacing the 2010 health care law.

New CBO Estimate Does Little to Woo Critics
Pelosi: ‘As bad as TrumpCare already was, the Manager’s Amendment is crueler to Medicaid recipients‘

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., attend a news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center to voice opposition to House Republican's health care plan, the American Health Care Act, March 14, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By ERIN MERSHON and JOE WILLIAMS, CQ Roll Call

An updated bill from House Republicans to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law would save the government less than half as much as the prior version, but wouldn’t result in any more people keeping their insurance coverage or lower premiums, according to a new analysis of the legislation released Thursday.

White House to Skeptical GOP Members on Health Bill: This Is It
President meets with various members, Republican and Democrat, over course of day

President Donald Trump still doesn't have the House votes to pass the GOP health plan. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The White House intensified its game of chicken with Republican lawmakers over the party’s health care overhaul plan, saying there is no Plan B.

Even as one GOP lawmaker told Roll Call there likely are around 30 “no” votes among the Republican conference — more than enough to sink the legislation — White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer warned members of his party “this is it.”

Word on the Hill: Cherry Blossoms
Your social calendar for the week

The Cherry Blossoms were in full bloom last year. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The cherry blossoms that survived the cold weather last week were supposed to reach their peak yesterday.

Have you seen the trees in bloom yet?

Word on the Hill: Cortez Masto and Latina Staffers
Tea party rally and award for Biden

Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto, center, front row, and the staffers. (Courtesy Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto's office)

Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto, D-Nev., met with Latina Senate staffers on Monday for a roundtable discussion on the importance of women and students of color getting access to internships and employment opportunities on Capitol Hill.

They also discussed obstacles women face in a Senate office and brainstormed other ways to address issues pertaining to a lack of diversity.

Former House GOP Campaign Chief Joins Holland & Knight
Tom Reynolds to boost firm’s ties to Republicans in power

Former New York Rep. Thomas M. Reynolds, pictured here in 2003, has built a lobbying practice since leaving Congress. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Former House Republican campaign chief Thomas M. Reynolds, a New Yorker who spent five terms in Congress, is bringing his lobbying practice to Holland & Knight as the firm tries to expand its Republican ties. 

Reynolds retired from the House, where he served on the Ways and Means Committee, in 2009. He set up shop at the firm Nixon Peabody where his recent clients have included Goldman Sachs Group, the American Unity Fund and the Council for Affordable Housing and Rural Development, disclosures show.

Top K Street Campaign Donors Already Writing Checks for 2018
GOP lobbyists focus on expanding Senate majority, Democrats target the House

Donations to campaigns from the top K Street lobbyists have been inching up each cycle since the Supreme Court’s 2010 Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission decision. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

K Street’s most generous political donors paid out a record sum during the 2016 campaign cycle, and many of them say they are already opening their wallets for next year’s elections despite fatigue at the pace of fundraising requests.

“I’m writing those checks a little more reluctantly — the hand is sort of shaking more than it used to,” said lobbyist Larry O’Brien, a longtime top donor to Democrats, only half-joking.

Opinion: Lying to Congress — Harm, But No Foul
McConnell let Cabinet nominees get away with it

There’s no penalty when Cabinet nominees lie under oath in  Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s Senate, Jonathan Allen writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It is a serious offense to lie to Congress — except when Congress doesn’t care.

Survey: Democratic Aides Doubt Senate Can Block SCOTUS Nominee
Staffers overwhelmingly expect Neil Gorsuch to be confirmed

Judge Neil Gorsuch meets with North Dakota Sen. Heidi Heitkamp in her Hart building office on Feb. 8. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Liberal advocacy groups are spending lots of time and money organizing for what they hope will be a big fight over President Donald Trump’s choice to fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court, federal appeals court Judge Neil Gorsuch.

They might be disheartened to learn that Democratic congressional aides don’t think they can block him.