Lindsey Graham

White House Middle East Victory Lap Draws Skepticism
Aides pushing a win, but headaches await return from region

President Donald Trump delivers a statement with Israeli President Reuven Rivlinon on Monday in Jerusalem. The White House says its first Middle East visit was a big success, but some Democrats are skeptical. (Lior Mizrahi/Getty Images)

The White House is describing President Donald Trump’s first dose of Middle East diplomacy as a “historic” success, but some lawmakers are skeptical that the optimistic rhetoric will become policy, and at least one is looking to block a major announcement from the trip. 

Trump spent all or parts of four days huddling with Muslim and Israeli leaders before heading to Europe on Tuesday afternoon. So confident was the White House that the first leg of Trump’s overseas diplomatic debut had gone well that they did not wait to land in Italy to declare victory.

Hill and Mueller Don’t Have to Clash, but It Will Not Be Easy
Congressional inquiries and prosecutors have different purposes, but the same witnesses

Former FBI Director Robert Mueller’s appointment as special counsel for the Russia investigation was greeted positively by lawmakers, but they disagreed on the effect his probe will have on their own investigations. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Congressional inquiries and special counsels can productively coexist, serving complementary purposes because of their reciprocal approaches, unless they’re unable to settle inevitable fights over the same documents and star witnesses.

That may be the best response to a question many on Capitol Hill started asking as soon as Robert S. Mueller III was appointed to run the government’s probe of Russian interference in last year’s election and whether Moscow collaborated with President Donald Trump’s campaign:

‘Law and Order’ President Meets Ultimate Lawman
Should Trump be concerned? ‘Absolutely,’ GOP strategist says

Sources and lawmakers describe former FBI Director Robert Mueller as a “superstar” and highly qualified to head the Russia investigation. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Donald Trump is fond of describing himself as a “law-and-order” president. Suddenly, however, the fate of his presidency could be decided by a man who embodies that characterization: Robert Mueller, a true lawman’s lawman.

The irony is thicker than a column on the White House’s North Portico. And for Trump, his party and the republic, the stakes could not be higher.

Senate Republicans Look to Refocus on Agenda
Appointment of special counsel for Russia probe provides cover

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein arrives in the Capitol to brief all 100 Senators on the firing of former FBI Director James Comey and the investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 campaign on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Republicans see the appointment of a special counsel to oversee the investigation into Russian influence of the 2016 elections as an opportunity to refocus attention on their legislative agenda.

Conversations on Capitol Hill this week have been dominated by a series of bombshell reports alleging that President Donald Trump shared sensitive information with Russian officials in Oval Office and tried to influence an FBI investigation into one of his former top aides.

Graham: Congress Will Have to Stay out of Mueller’s Lane in Russia Probe
Conversations between Trump and Comey could be subject of special counsel

Sen. Lindsey Graham says the appointment of a special counsel may limit the ability of Congress to get information. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The senator leading one of the probes into Russian activities related to the 2016 election says the appointment of a special counsel is likely to restrict public access to information.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, the chairman of the Judiciary subcommittee looking into the Russian election interference efforts, has been among the senators seeking testimony from former FBI Director James B. Comey in the aftermath of his firing by President Donald Trump. But now Graham is not expecting to hear much.

Cloud of Scandals Follow Trump Overseas
Lawmakers warn of stalled domestic agenda

President Donald Trump exits Air Force One on Feb. 6 at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla. On Friday, he leaves on a five-country swing amid several domestic scandals. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ned T. Johnston via Wikimedia Commons)

A cloud of scandal and uncertainty will follow Donald Trump to five countries on his first overseas trip as president beginning this weekend. And it could only grow more ominous by the time he returns.

When Trump boards Air Force One on Friday, he will leave behind a growing pile of smoldering scandals, mostly of his own creation.

Vulnerable Republicans Call on Comey to Testify Before Congress
Most are House Democratic targets in 2018

Florida Rep. Carlos Curbelo said that, if true, the Comey memo allegations open up “a new chapter that all of us have to consider very carefully.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Vulnerable House Republicans are calling for former FBI Director James B. Comey to testify before Congress following a report from The New York Times that President Donald Trump told him to drop an investigation into his former national security adviser’s ties to Russia.

Comey, the Times reported, wrote a memo documenting a conversation he had with Trump in February the day after national security adviser Michael Flynn was forced to resign amid revelations about his correspondence with the Russian ambassador during Trump’s presidential campaign.

Cornyn Withdraws From Consideration as FBI Director
Majority Whip says the best way he can serve is by remaining in the Senate

Cornyn was interviewed for the FBI director job. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. John Cornyn has taken himself out of consideration to be the next F.B.I. director, he informed President Donald Trump’s administration Tuesday.

The Texas Republican said in a statement that the best place for him to serve is in the Senate.

Senators React With Alarm, Caution to Report That Trump Revealed Classified Info
President's top security adviser: ‘I was in the room, it didn’t happen’

A Washington Post report alleges that President Donald Trump revealed highly classified information to Russian officials last week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

By JOHN T. BENNETT, NIELS LESNIEWSKI and JOE WILLIAMSCQ Roll Call

Some senators expressed shock — while others reacted cautiously  — to a report Monday evening alleging that President Donald Trump revealed highly classified information about Islamic State plots gleaned by a U.S. ally to senior Russian officials. 

Photos of the Week: Sally Yates, Town Halls and the Post-Comey Chaos
The week of May 8 as seen by Roll Call's photographers

A Senate staffer attempts to deliver a poster to the hearing room where former acting Attorney General Sally Yates and former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper were set to testify during a hearing on “Russian Interference in the 2016 United States Election” on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)