leadership races

Ryan Beefs Up Speaker's Communications Team

(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 4:00 p.m. | One of Paul D. Ryan’s plans for the speakership was to make up for less time spent on the road with more time spent communicating the GOP’s message. In a sign he plans to deliver on that pledge, the Wisconsin Republican announced Monday eight appointments to his communications staff.  

“This speakership is going to be about communicating a conservative vision and bold agenda for the American people, and I’m building a first-rate team to help me do the job,” Ryan said in a statement. Along with Brendan Buck, who was his communications director on Ways and Means and was already announced as chief communications adviser in the speaker’s office, the fresh crop of hires include four other staffers Ryan is bringing over from Ways and Means, three Boehner holdovers, and one former presidential campaign and Senate press aide.  

New Title, but No New Digs for Ryan

Ryan is the new speaker of the House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 11:53 a.m. | Newly elected Speaker Paul D. Ryan won't be getting a new home in the District of Columbia, but he is looking into some new carpet for the speaker's office.  

The Wisconsin Republican made the rounds to all five of the Sunday morning political talk shows and informed both CNN's "State of the Union" and NBC's "Meet the Press" that he plans to continue sleeping in his office. "Look, I just work here," Ryan told NBC's Chuck Todd about his sleeping arrangements.  

Boehner: 'God Had Another Plan' for Ryan

Ryan addresses the House. (Tom Williams, CQ Roll Call)

Paul D. Ryan said he took the job he didn't want, speaker of the House, out of an obligation to help unify a fractured Republican Conference.  

The Wisconsin lawmaker's immediate predecessor, John A. Boehner, said Sunday there was another compelling factor at play: God. "You have no choice, this isn't about what you want to do, this is about what God wants you to do, and God told me he wants you to do this," Boehner said he told Ryan a few weeks ago and recounted in an interview with CNN's Dana Bash that aired on the "State of the Union" program.  

Appropriator Praises Speaker 'Sonny Boy' Ryan

Lowey, D-N.Y. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Republicans showed Thursday they were willing to give Paul D. Ryan a chance when they overwhelmingly elected him the 54th Speaker of the House.  

Democrats are also showing signs of enthusiasm for the Wisconsin Republican's promotion. Appropriations Ranking Member Nita M. Lowey, D-N.Y., told CQ Roll Call shortly after Ryan's swearing-in ceremony she had "enormous respect" for the incoming speaker, with whom she said she grew close following a congressional delegation trip to Saudi Arabia nearly a decade ago.  

Bigger Bucks, Better Office View Greet Paul Ryan

Nancy Pelosi and Ryan as he takes over as House speaker. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Paul D. Ryan woke up Friday for the first time as speaker of the House. Little may feel different to him yet, but at least five things have immediately changed for the Wisconsin Republican:  

The Line: As speaker, Ryan automatically joins the presidential line of succession. He could have been first in line if he and Mitt Romney had won the 2012 presidential election, but the former vice presidential candidate will have to settle for second in line. Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. is first.  

Ryan Set for 'Full Ginsburg' TV Appearances

Ryan addresses the House. (Tom Williams, CQ Roll Call)

Newly elected House Speaker Paul D. Ryan will be a guest on all five Sunday political talk shows to discuss his election and plans for the House, his spokesman Brendan Buck tweeted Thursday afternoon. The Sunday programs are Fox News Sunday, CNN’s State of the Union, NBC’s Meet the Press, CBS’s Face the Nation and ABC’s This Week.  

Appearing on all five shows is commonly called "the full Ginsburg," in a reference to William H. Ginsburg, who was Monica Lewinsky's lawyer at the start of the scandal over her affair with President Bill Clinton. Ginsburg died in 2013.  

10 Anti-Boehner Republicans Who Didn't Vote for Ryan

Ryan before the speaker vote. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 2:24 p.m. | Call them the "Speaker No" crowd.  

Ten Republicans who did not vote for Paul D. Ryan to be the 54th speaker of the House Thursday also didn't vote to support John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, in January. Nine Republicans voted for Rep. Daniel Webster, R-Fla., to be speaker. Webster, the tenth Republican who did not vote for Ryan or Boehner, said he and the Wisconsin Republican had agreed not to vote for themselves.  

Critics of Leadership Warming to Paul Ryan

(Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Ahead of the House GOP's long-awaited vote to nominate a new speaker, persistent skeptics of Rep. Paul D. Ryan appear to be warming to him as their leader  

Many of the conference's most conservative hard-liners emerged from a speaker candidates' forum early Wednesday saying the Wisconsin Republican has begun to earn their respect as well as their confidence that he will usher in a more inclusive legislative era. "I think he's actually saying the things we were hoping he would say all along," said Rep. Matt Salmon, R-Ariz., who earlier in the process was supporting Ryan's only challenger, Rep. Daniel Webster of Florida.  

Grass Roots to Ryan: Show, Don't Tell, on Budget Deal

Boehner, left, and Ryan share a moment on the House floor. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Paul D. Ryan isn’t even House speaker yet, but conservative grass-roots activists say he can't hide while his predecessor moves a budget and debt-limit deal they despise. Their message: Ryan must lead — now.  

Outgoing Speaker John A. Boehner, in setting the stage for Ryan to take the gavel Thursday, is pushing through a major deal the nation’s business community widely cheers. But instead of leaving Ryan with the clean barn the retiring Ohio Republican promised, the move already is creating blowback from GOP hard-liners for the likely speaker. Ryan told NBC the deal’s process “stinks” Tuesday and pledged to run the House a different way, but conservative organizations aren’t buying it and they want to see actions from the incoming speaker, not words.  

Steering Committee, Other Rules Changes to Confront GOP

McMorris Rodgers and Messer arrive Monday for a meeting with Boehner. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 7:18 p.m. | House Republicans could vote as early as this week on some changes to their official rules — including a plan to diversify the makeup of the powerful Steering Committee, Conference Chairwoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers told CQ Roll Call Tuesday.  

Fast-tracking a vote to broaden member representation of the board that makes committee assignments could have an immediate effect on Republicans Kevin Brady of Texas and Pat Tiberi of Ohio, who are vying to succeed Paul D. Ryan as chairman of Ways and Means. Ryan is poised to become the next speaker Thursday.