Latinos

Latino Voters Angry at Trump But Not Mobilized, Democratic Report Finds
Blue candidates need clear message to court Latino votes in midterms, according to study

Latino voters’ anger at Trump administration policies could be an opening for Democrats in 2018 a new report finds. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats have a chance to win big in this year’s midterms by channeling Latino voters’ anger at President Donald Trump’s immigration and health care agenda, according to the findings of a Democratic-funded study released Tuesday.

But first, they’ll have to convince Latinos their vote will mean something.

Analysis: Trump Skips Tough Immigration Talk With Latinos
President addressed business group in his charmer-in-chief persona

President Donald Trump delivers remarks during the Latino Coalition’s Legislative Summit at the J.W. Marriott in Washington. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

The crowd Donald Trump addressed Wednesday didn’t chant “build the wall!” And the president didn’t mention the border barrier idea that helped him get elected. Nor did he talk of Latino gangs, immigrant “rapists” and mass deportations.

Trump appeared something of a fish out of water as he stood at the familiar presidential podium before a backdrop featuring the logo of The Latino Coalition. After all, as a presidential candidate Trump railed against Latin American countries for sending drug pushers and “criminals” to the United States.

Poll: Pope Influences Politics, Policy Among U.S. Catholics

Pope Francis blesses a boy as arrives in Saint Peter's square for his weekly audience at the Vatican on September 2. (Vincenzo Pinto/AFP/Getty Images)

UPDATE: 11:40 a.m. | Support for Pope Francis' message and the direction in which he is leading the church among American Catholic voters — especially Latinos — should make everyone "pause for a moment of awe," an expert said of poll results released Wednesday.  

The survey — from Faith In Public Life and The Catholic University of America in advance of Francis' first visit to the U.S. next week — found that Latino Catholic voters are the most responsive to the pope's messages that the government should do more to reduce the gap between the rich and poor, as well as a bigger government that provides more services.