Kevin Brady

Tax Cut Bills Face Increasing Partisanship: Recent Tax Votes in One Chart
Democrats more likely to oppose Republican presidents’ tax plans

House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady and House Majority Whip Steve Scalise embrace during a news conference in the Capitol after the House passed the the GOP’s tax overhaul bill Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House on Thursday passed a bill to answer President Donald Trump’s call for a big tax cut without the support of a single Democrat.

Tax cut votes have historically been bipartisan affairs, with both parties supporting cuts signed by presidents Eisenhower, Johnson, Nixon, Reagan, Clinton and Obama.

Opinion: The GOP Tax Bill — All Hat and No Rabbit
Even passing no legislation might be a better option

From left, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady and Majority Whip Steve Scalise celebrate during a news conference after the chamber passed the GOP tax bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

All politics is state and local.

That update of Tip O’Neill’s dictum is inspired by the Republican tax bill. The legislation that passed the House on Thursday eviscerates the deduction for state and local taxes and the current Senate version, which just emerged from the Finance Committee, eliminates the write-off entirely.

GOP Leaders Predict More ‘Yes’ Votes on Final Tax Bill
‘As long as you cross the finish line’

From left, House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wisc., and House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., arrive to speak to reporters following the House Republican Conference meeting in the Capitol on Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republican leaders said they were not surprised by the comfortable nine-vote margin by which they passed their tax overhaul bill and predicted an even bigger spread on a final package reconciled with the Senate.

“I was not surprised by any of the ‘no’ votes or the ‘yes’ votes,” House Majority Whip Steve Scalise told Roll Call. “So it was a lot of work over the last week, but I was really proud of the conference and what they did for the country.”

House Rules Committee Adopts Closed Rule for GOP Tax Bill
With last hurdle cleared, measure heads to the floor

House Rules Chairman Pete Sessions, center, and Washington Rep. Dan Newhouse, seen here with a staffer in March, joined six other Republicans Tuesday night to send the GOP tax bill to the floor. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Republican tax bill cleared the Rules Committee late Tuesday night with no changes or amendments made in order for floor debate.

The panel adopted a closed rule in an 8-3 party-line vote, the last hurdle for the bill to clear before it reaches the floor.

Barton Goes to Bat for Rangers in Tax Overhaul Game
Texas Republican hopes to preserve a break for the home team

Republican team manager, Texas Rep. Joe L. Barton, right, talks with Democratic team manager, Pennsylvania Rep. Mike Doyle, before the 50th annual Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park in 2011. (Tom Williams/Roll Call file photo)

Updated 11/16/17 10:21 a.m. | Texas Republican Rep. Joe L. Barton said Monday he was leaning toward voting “yes” on the House tax overhaul bill, but he was still on the fence because of a district issue he wanted to fix.

Barton declined to reveal the issue at the time. It became clear Tuesday based on an amendment he filed to the bill in the House Rules Committee that his hangup is about the Texas Rangers.

Tax Fight Coming Over Politicking by Churches, Nonprofits
Endorsing or opposing candidates is prohibited — for now

Lawmakers are considering legislation that could have broad implications for churches and charities. (Roll Call file photo)

How lawmakers resolve one contentious item between the House and Senate’s diverging tax overhauls may have broad implications for future politicking by churches and charities.

The House bill would repeal the longstanding Johnson Amendment, which prohibits churches and other 501(c)(3) nonprofit organizations from endorsing — or opposing — candidates for elective office. But after a backlash from liberal organizations who said the change could open up a whole new avenue for undisclosed political money at taxpayer expense, senators decided not to roll back the Johnson Amendment in their overhaul plan.

Freedom Caucus Chairman Predicts Tax Bill Will Pass
But Rep. Mark Meadows says members expect more changes in conference

Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows says caucus members still have more changes they’d like to see in the final GOP tax overhaul. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows on Monday predicted the Republican tax bill will pass the House this week, saying several members of his caucus appear willing to support the bill to keep the process moving.

“I think most of our members are a ‘Lean yes,’ some are undecided,” the North Carolina Republican said. “But all of that is with the caveat that there is still much work that needs to be done before there’s support for a final bill. So if this bill were to come up for a final vote on the floor, there wouldn’t be as many yeses as there are right now.”

GOP Leadership Confident on Votes for House Tax Bill, Brady Says
Both versions still violate Byrd rule by raising deficit after 10 years

From left, Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, Rep. Richard Neal, D-Mass., ranking member, and Rep. Mike Thompson, D-Calif., attend a House Ways and Means Committee markup. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady told reporters Monday changes could be made to the House tax overhaul bill before it reaches the floor Thursday but they would not be substantive.

“We don’t anticipate major changes,” Brady said of the possibility that Rules Committee would adopt an amendment to the bill when it meets Wednesday. “A lot of the work has been done.”

From Asia, Trump Presses Tax Writers on Individual Mandate
Neither House nor Senate GOP overhaul bill includes repeal language

Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., speaks with President Donald Trump as they arrive for the Senate Republicans’ policy lunch in the Capitol on Oct. 24. Trump tweeted Monday from Asia that he wants tax legislation to repeal the individual health insurance mandate. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump on Monday again pressed House and Senate Republican lawmakers to use tax overhaul legislation to end the 2010 health care law’s individual insurance mandate, something neither chamber’s plan includes.

Tweeting just before midnight in Manila, Philippines, Trump laid down a marker for House and Senate Republicans as they continue work on their separate bills. The president wrote that he is “proud of the Rep. House & Senate for working so hard on cutting taxes {& reform.} We’re getting close!”

Podcast: What Businesses Have to Gain From the Tax Overhaul
The Week Ahead, Episode 78

Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, left, and Rep. Richard Neal, D-Mass., ranking member, conduct a House Ways and Means Committee markup of the Republicans' tax reform plan titled the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, in Longworth Building on November 9, 2017. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rachelle Bernstein of the National Retail Federation and a long time voice on tax policy around Capitol Hill explains what businesses, large and small, are looking for in the tax overhaul and the lessons learned from the Bush-era tax cuts.

Show Notes: