Judiciary

Grassley Refers Avenatti, Kavanaugh Accuser Client for Criminal Investigation
Judiciary chairman asks DOJ to look at three potential violations: conspiracy, false statements and obstruction of Congress

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, has referred attorney Michael Avenatti and his client Julie Swetnick to the Justice Department for criminal investigation related to accusations they made against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh during his confirmation process. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley is referring attorney Michael Avenatti and his client Julie Swetnick to the Justice Department for criminal investigation related to their accusations against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh during his confirmation process.

Swetnick was among the women who came forward to accuse Kavanaugh of sexual assault. Specifically, she said she observed Kavanaugh and his friends drinking to excess at parties in high school and lining up outside bedrooms to gang rape females. 

Protesters Rile Kavanaugh Hearing
Opponents of Supreme Court nominee disrupt both Republican and Democratic remarks

Dozens of protesters were arrested Tuesday at the first confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Dozens of protesters were arrested Tuesday during the confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, with Capitol Police steadily removing protesters from the hearing room after they stood and shouted at lawmakers and disrupted the proceedings.

As Kavanaugh sat stone-faced in the hearing room, the protesters urged Senators on the Judiciary Committee to vote against his confirmation and adjourn the hearing.

GOP Slips Past Another Senate Custom, and Democrats Turn Blue
Home-state senators’ sway over judicial nominees is quickly disappearing

Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell have decided that the use of a “blue slip” when considering judicial nominees is a practice that needs to fade away, Hawkings writes. (Scott J. Ferrell/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The latest threat to what’s made the Senate the Senate for generations can be illustrated with a sheet of paper the color of cornflowers.

First to go was the reverence for compromise. It went out the window a decade or so ago, the start of the current era when the most conservative Democrat is reliably positioned to the left of the most liberal Republican. Then the veneration of minority-party rights got obliterated, five years ago, with a blast of “nuclear” limits on filibuster powers.

Trump’s Stamp on Judiciary Starting: It Could Be Much Faster
With no filibuster and a GOP Senate, he’s got a big opening to reshape appeals courts

The four appellate nominees moving through the Senate this week include, from left, Amy Coney Barrett, Joan Larsen, Allison H. Eid and Stephanos Bibas. Barrett and Larsen have already been confirmed. (Courtesy Screenshot/C-SPAN, Joan Larsen/Facebook, University of Pennsylvania Law School)

While White House officials are subsumed by the fresh intensity of the special counsel investigation, and House Republicans are preoccupied with propping up the tax overhaul, their GOP colleagues in the Senate are focusing on something not nearly as provocative as either of those things — but perhaps almost as consequential over the long haul.

This week, they’re pushing to double, from four to eight, the number of reliable conservatives that President Donald Trump has installed on the federal appeals courts during the opening year of his administration.

Capitol Ink | Poetry Sessions

Capitol-Ink-10-19-17

Gorsuch on Judicial Independence: ‘That’s a Softball’
 

Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch fielded questions from the Senate Judiciary Committee on the second day of his confirmation hearings Tuesday. When asked by Chairman Charles E. Grassley if he would have any trouble ruling against President Donald Trump, Gorsuch called it a “softball question.”

Capitol Ink | Invisible Man
Supreme Court Nominee Merrick Garland at the Capitol

Supreme Court Nominee Merrick Garland at the Capitol