John Conyers Jr

Collins Defends Trump Over Flynn While GOP Colleagues Remain Silent
N.Y. congressman: ‘I don’t believe anyone knew what Gen. Flynn was doing’

New York Rep. Chris Collins, seen here speaking at a Donald Trump campaign rally in Buffalo, N.Y., last year, is a lone voice defending Trump after his national security adviser resigned late Monday night 25 days into Trump’s presidency. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Chris Collins of New York, one of President Donald Trump’s most vocal supporters on Capitol Hill, is defending the administration after Michael Flynn resigned his post as national security adviser.

Yet, most of his Republican colleagues are notably silent.

Democrats Want Probe of ‘Unfit’ Flynn’s Russia Ties
Cummings, Conyers want Justice briefing before President’s Day holiday recess

Retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn, at podium, and then-Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at a campaign event at the Trump International Hotel on Pennsylvania Ave., NW, in Washington. On Monday night, Flynn resigned as Trump's national security adviser. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Congressional Democrats are applauding the resignation of National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, labeling him “unfit” for the office and calling for the Justice Department to fully disclose his ties to Russia.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi called for an “bipartisan, independent, outside commission” to investigate President Donald Trump’s and his administration’s connections with Russia.

Trump’s National Security Adviser Resigns
Growing concerns over communications with Russian ambassador to U.S.

Michael Flynn, the national security adviser to President Donald Trump, has submitted his resignation amidst controversy over his communications with a Russian ambassador. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Michael Flynn, President Donald Trump’s mercurial national security adviser, submitted his resignation late Monday amidst growing controversy over his communications with Russia’s ambassador to the United States.

Flynn wrote in his resignation letter that he provided “incomplete information” about conversations with Ambassador Sergey Kislyak.

Photos of the Week: Pence Casts Historic Vote, Gorsuch to the Hill and Warren Reads King
The week of Feb. 6 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Protesters gather in Upper Senate Park at the Capitol on Monday to call on senators to reject Secretary of Education nominee Betsy DeVos. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By BILL CLARK and TOM WILLIAMS CQ Roll Call

A busy week in the Capitol was marked by several historic moments, including the first time a vice president has cast a tiebreaker vote on a cabinet nomination. The Senate, in protest of several of President Donald Trump’s Cabinet nominees, was in session for more than two days. The late night session made headlines when Massachusetts Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren was silenced as she read a 1986 letter from Coretta Scott King about Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Democrats Back #LetLizSpeak Campaign
Warren's colleagues show they can use Twitter, too

Democrats like Schumer have joined in on Twitter’s #LetLizSpeak campaign to protest Republicans’ shutting down Warren’s speech about Sessions. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats are taking up the #LetLizSpeak Twitter campaign backing Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren for her floor speech against attorney general nominee Sen. Jeff Sessions that Republicans cut off Tuesday night. 

Warren was reading a letter the late Coretta Scott King wrote to the Senate Judiciary Committee in 1986 opposing Sessions’ confirmation to be a federal district court judge as well as quoting statements from the late Sen. Edward Kennedy from that time. King’s letter said, among other thing, “Sessions has used the awesome powers of his office in a shabby attempt to intimidate and frighten elderly black voters.”

Celebrating Black History Month With Added Resonance
Obama retirement, record number of black lawmakers mark 2017

Former President Barack Obama's departure from the East Front of the Capitol on Jan. 20 was a bittersweet moment for African-American members of Congress. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Black History Month this year has taken on an added resonance, reflected in the record number of African-Americans in Congress.

In the Senate, it has been a long buildup to the current high-water mark of three members: Republican Tim Scott of South Carolina and Democrats Cory Booker of New Jersey and Kamala Harris of California. 

Black History Month: Cedric Richmond on the ‘Work to Do’ Ahead
CBC chairman says promises of King, Chisholm haven’t yet been fulfilled

Louisiana Rep. Cedric L. Richmond speaks with New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker after the two, along with Georgia Rep. John Lewis, testified last month against the nomination of Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions to be attorney general on the grounds of his civil rights history. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

For Congressional Black Caucus Chairman Cedric L. Richmond, this month is about teaching. First celebrated in 1926 as a weeklong tribute to black history and culture and expanded to a monthlong honor in 1976, Black History Month is a time of reflection and festivity for many African-Americans. Roll Call interviewed Richmond and several other lawmakers and Capitol Hill figures, such as Senate Chaplain Barry C. Black, to find out what the intersection of black history and life in Congress and the Capitol building itself means to them.

Watch interviews and the video, “Black History and America's Capitol,” which combines all these talks, at rollcall.com/black-history-month. Richmond’s full discussion with Roll Call is below.

Questions Abound in Wake of Trump Firing Acting AG
Furor surrounds replacing of deputy AG and head of ICE

Acting Attorney General Sally Yates said there were too many questions about the administration’s travel ban directed at Muslim countries, so the president fired her. (Pete Marovich/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump, on just his 10th day in office, fired the acting attorney general for refusing to defend his contentious refugee order. Trump said Yates, a 27-year veteran of the department with respect across the aisle, had “betrayed” the Justice Department, even as top Democrats lodged howls of protest.

Trump decided to relieve Yates of duty after she informed Justice Department lawyers that she was “not convinced that the defense of the executive order is consistent with these responsibilities.” In a statement sure to raise the ire of the White House, Yates also wrote in a letter to the lawyers that she was not sure “the executive order is lawful.”

Democrats Do What They Can With What They Have
Members demand meeting with Homeland Security secretary

New York Democratic Rep. Grace Meng plans to introduce a bill on the House floor to prevent a controversial executive order signed by President Donald Trump from taking further effect. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

House Democrats want to keep pressure on Republicans amid the fallout over the Trump administration’s executive order banning refugees and legal travelers from several majority-Muslim countries.

Although Democrats in the chamber have little recourse to force votes on legislation, several high-ranking committee members are demanding answers from the Homeland Security secretary at the same time that others are readying legislation to rescind the executive action and keep the heat on the GOP. Democrats Rally at Supreme Court Against Trump Ban

Photos of the Week: Confirmation Hearing Frenzy on Capitol Hill
The week of Jan. 9 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee for attorney general, and Chairman Charles E. Grassley, R-Iowa, prepare for Sessions’ Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in Russell Building’s Kennedy Caucus Room on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A total of seven confirmation hearings for President-elect Donald Trump’s Cabinet picks kicked off on the Hill this week. Meanwhile, a back-and-forth erupted between the parties over a student painting being taken down from the Cannon House Office Building.