John A Boehner

Freedom Caucus Member’s Book Slams Money-Obsessed Politicians
In ‘Drain the Swamp,’ Ken Buck also takes aim at NRCC’s ‘pay-to-play’ culture

Colorado Rep. Ken Buck attributes criticism of the House Freedom Caucus to “just plain jealousy.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Freedom Caucus member Ken Buck describes a money-hungry, lobbyist-influenced Republican leadership in his first book “Drain the Swamp” but he told CQ Roll Call that life is better for the hard-line conservative faction under Speaker Paul D. Ryan.

The Colorado Republican, now in his second term, has few kind words in his book released this week for Ryan’s predecessor, Ohio’s John A. Boehner, whom conservative lawmakers worked to oust. Boehner has since set up a practice at the K Street firm Squire Patton Boggs, and his spokesman did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Survey: GOP Staffers Reeling From Health Care Setback
Ryan’s approval rating drops among House Republican aides

Speaker Paul D. Ryan’s approval rating among House GOP staffers stands at its lowest level since he assumed the speakership, according to the latest CQ Roll Call Capitol Insiders Survey. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican aides are reeling from the implosion of their party’s attempt to repeal President Barack Obama’s health care law, according to the latest CQ Roll Call Capitol Insiders Survey.

Paul D. Ryan’s approval rating among House GOP staffers has dropped to its lowest level since he became speaker in 2015, plummeting from 85 percent three weeks after Election Day to 44 percent in March. Those are levels not seen — for either party’s congressional leaders — since the ouster of Ryan’s predecessor, John A. Boehner of Ohio, a year and a half ago.

How Devin Nunes Got Where He Is Today
Networking, not expertise, got him the Intel gavel so many now want to take away

California Rep. Devin Nunes is facing criticism for gridlocking the House Intelligence Committee at a potentially historic point in history. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Any search for a single Republican capable of undermining not only his party’s efforts to project a modicum of independence from President Donald Trump, but also the House’s institutional standing in the world of global affairs oversight, would not normally focus on an alfalfa and dairy farmer turned congressman from California.

But such is the uniquely unsettled nature of Washington this spring that the open casting call for the most newly pilloried person at the Capitol this year is over after just 10 weeks, the role awarded by virtually unanimous consent to Devin Gerald Nunes.

White House Ends 10th Week Like Others: Embroiled in Controversies
Possible campaign collusion with Russia an anchor on Trump administration

The White House was on the defensive from multiple controversies at the end of its 10th month under the presidency of Donald Trump.(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Trump White House on Friday ended the week in a manner that has become routine: embroiled in controversies that staffers struggle to explain and that threaten the president’s legislative agenda.

The beginning of the week mirrored the pattern of most of the nine of Donald Trump’s presidency that came before it — recovering from a setback, this time in the form of the collapse of the GOP-crafted health bill’s failure. 

Why Ryan Is Key to Republican Moderates’ Survival
Health care debacle has left GOP centrists without political cover

Some House Republican moderates are pushing Speaker Paul D. Ryan to try a different approach on health care. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Some moderate Republicans were left out in the cold by the GOP leadership’s push of a deeply unpopular health care bill over the last month.

And now, with leadership signaling it’s sticking by its commitment to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law, they have every reason to want Speaker Paul D. Ryan to try a different approach — to save themselves and their party.

Radel Dishes on His Career — and a Little About Cocaine
Former Florida congressman’s book released Tuesday

Trey Radel, then a Florida congressman, leaves court in November 2013 after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor charge of cocaine possession. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Florida Republican Rep. Trey Radel, who resigned after he was convicted of cocaine possession, comes clean about his short-lived career in Congress and shares a little about the drug that doomed him.

“While my deepest personal weaknesses cut short my dreams and work in Congress, I picked myself up. As individuals and a country, we can do the same,” he sums up in “Democrazy: A True Story of Weird Politics, Money, Madness & Finger Food.” The 300-page account of his life and times was released Tuesday.

Word on the Hill: Snow Day
Cancellations and closures

Washington saw a lot of snow last year in late January. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Precautions were being taken on Monday for the expected snowfall overnight and into today.

Speaker Paul D. Ryan announced that the House would convene in a pro forma session at noon Monday because of Tuesday’s forecast. 

Conservatives Take Shots at Independent-Minded GOP Senators
Activists worry party mavericks could upend health care repeal efforts

Maine Sen. Susan Collins has often found herself at odds with conservative groups. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Activist groups that want conservative orthodoxy on Capitol Hill have aimed their fire previously at Republicans including House Speaker Paul D. Ryan and his predecessor, John A. Boehner. Now they have some new targets. 

Their focus has turned to three senators who’ve shown some willingness to challenge President Donald Trump: Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and John McCain of Arizona.

GOP Senators Ask Trump to Block Restoration of Earmarks
House Republicans expect hearings on the matter

Arizona Republican Sens. Jeff Flake left, ,and John McCain, right, are asking the president to block a proposal that would reinstate earmarks. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Six Republican senators are sending a letter to President Donald Trump Tuesday asking him to oppose any congressional effort to restore earmarks.

The letter from GOP Sens. Jeff Flake and John McCain of Arizona, Ted Cruz of Texas, Mike Lee of Utah, Rand Paul of Kentucky and Ben Sasse of Nebraska comes as House Republicans are expected to soon begin holding hearings on the idea of allowing earmarks to make a comeback after congressional Republicans, led by then-Speaker John A. Boehner, banned them in 2011.

Survey: Democratic Aides Doubt Senate Can Block SCOTUS Nominee
Staffers overwhelmingly expect Neil Gorsuch to be confirmed

Judge Neil Gorsuch meets with North Dakota Sen. Heidi Heitkamp in her Hart building office on Feb. 8. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Liberal advocacy groups are spending lots of time and money organizing for what they hope will be a big fight over President Donald Trump’s choice to fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court, federal appeals court Judge Neil Gorsuch.

They might be disheartened to learn that Democratic congressional aides don’t think they can block him.