Joe Crowley

Crowley Loss Creates Open Field for Next Generation of Democratic Leaders
Plenty of options, but who wants to — and who’s ready to — step up?

From left, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, Rhode Island Rep. David Cicilline, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Maryland Sen. Chris Van Hollen, New York Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, New Mexico Rep. Ben Ray Luján, Virginia Sen. Mark Warner and Illinois Rep. Cheri Bustos attend a rally in Berryville, Va., in July 2017. The event featured a wide swath of Democratic leaders from both chambers. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

“Not so fast. Not so fast.”

That was House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi’s initial response — albeit a joking one — Wednesday morning to a reporter who pointed out that “at some point” the California Democrat and her top two lieutenants will no longer be in Congress.

Top 3 House Democrats Fine With Crowley Staying on as No. 4
Pelosi, Hoyer and Clyburn don’t think Crowley needs to step down as Democratic Caucus chairman

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., pictured with Democratic Caucus Chairman Joe Crowley, D-N.Y., and Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, D-Md., at an event in January. After Crowley lost his primary Tuesday, Pelosi and Hoyer do not think he needs to step down from his leadership position. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democratic Caucus Chairman Joseph Crowley does not need to step down from his No. 4 position in leadership after losing his primary in New York’s 14th District Tuesday night, the top three House Democrats said. 

“No, absolutely not,” Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said when asked if Crowley should step down as caucus chairman. The California Democrat added that “of course” Crowley can continue in his leadership role. 

House Again Rejects Move to Form Select Committee on Chaplain Controversy
Republicans reluctant to back Crowley's resolution on second try

House Chaplain Patrick Conroy has been at the center of a simmering dispute over his resignation — and un-resignation. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Whatever bipartisan support Democrats had for probing the circumstances that led Speaker Paul D. Ryan to call for the House chaplain’s resignation appears to be gone now that Patrick J. Conroy has been reinstated to his post. 

The House on Tuesday approved a motion to table a privileged resolution offered by Democratic Caucus Chairman Joe Crowley of New York to form a select committee to look into the chaplain controversy. The motion was adopted 223-182.

3 Ways In Which the House Chaplain Controversy May Continue
Lawmakers still want answers about the speaker’s decision to fire Rev. Patrick J. Conroy

House Chaplain Patrick J. Conroy is staying is position but lawmakers are still questioning why he was asked to leave in the first place. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Chaplain Patrick J. Conroy is getting to stay in his position, but that doesn’t mean the controversy surrounding Speaker Paul D. Ryan’s initial decision to fire him is going away. 

Several lawmakers are still questioning what influenced the Wisconsin Republican to make his call and how to prevent future speakers from unilaterally seeking to remove the House chaplain. 

Kaptur Exploring Legislative Reprieve for Ousted House Chaplain
Ohio Democrat said any legislation she proposes would be bipartisan

House Chaplain Patrick J. Conroy performs a marriage ceremony in 2015 for Alaska Rep. Don Young and Anne Garland Walton in the chapel of the U.S. Capitol. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Marcy Kaptur does not believe Speaker Paul D. Ryan has authority to remove House Chaplain Patrick J. Conroy without a vote of the House. And she’s exploring legislation to prevent his ouster. 

Conroy submitted a letter of resignation April 15 at the speaker’s request that was read on the House floor the following day. Ryan’s spokeswoman AshLee Strong confirmed that Ryan sought the Jesuit priest’s resignation but did not provide a reason why. 

Crowley Will Not Challenge Pelosi, Announces Bid for Caucus Chair
New York Democrat had declined to rule out bid for minority leader just hours earlier

New York Rep. Joseph Crowley is bidding for the House Democratic caucus chairmanship. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

New York Democratic Rep. Joseph Crowley on Thursday announced that he would run for Democratic Caucus chairman, just hours after he declined to rule out challenging Nancy Pelosi for the House minority leader position.

Democrats Qualify Support for 9/11 Bill
House and Senate likely to override presidential veto

Democratic Caucus Chairman Xavier Becerra, D-Calif., is among the House Democrats supporting the 9/11 bill while expressing concern it could open up the United States to new litigation abroad. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats on Wednesday further offered their support for a bill that would allow victims of the Sept. 11 terror attacks to take legal action against foreign countries while acknowledging President Barack Obama’s opposition.

Rep. Joseph Crowley, a New York Democrat, said he understood Obama’s concerns the bill could open the door for other nations to tie up the U.S. government in costly and lengthy litigation abroad.

So What’s Going On In Congress With Gun Control?
 

Democrats Vow to Keep Up the Fight on Gun Control
 

After nearly 26 hours on the House floor demanding a vote on gun control, Democrats emerged from the Capitol to greet crowds of cheering protesters supporting their cause.

“We will continue to insist, to demand, action,” Rep. John Lewis said. “We’re not giving up, we’re not giving in."

Minority Party Makes a Major Shift in House
Democrats have elevated their messaging, raised their voices on key issues

From left, Reps. Paul Tonko, James E. Clyburn, John Lewis, Joseph Crowley and Nancy Pelosi sing "We Shall Overcome" with demonstrators on the East Front of the Capitol after the House Democrats' sit-in ended Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

"Emboldened."   

That was how House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi described the mood as her Democratic colleagues staged a sit-in  Wednesday on the House floor to call for a vote on gun control. Democrats left the chamber Thursday, nearly 26 hours later, still showing signs of that boldness.