Jody B Hice

Kevin McCarthy Elected House Minority Leader Over Jim Jordan
Promotion to top GOP spot improves his chances of one day being speaker

Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., is the new House Republican leader. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans on Wednesday elected Rep. Kevin McCarthy as their minority leader over Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan, a decision that improves the likelihood that one day the California Republican might be speaker. 

McCarthy has vowed to lead Republicans back into the majority over the next two years. If he succeeds, the chances of him being elected speaker would be significantly higher than had Republicans held the majority this year. 

How the Rest of Congress Reacted to Rosenstein Impeachment Articles
Resolution from 11 conservative House members unlikely to move

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., and 10 other House Republican brought forth impeachment articles Wednesday against Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats and a handful of Republicans responded quickly to oppose impeachment articles against Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein brought forth by members of the conservative House Freedom Caucus.

Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows of North Carolina and Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan, a founding member, introduced a resolution to impeach Rosenstein late Wednesday but did not file it as a privileged resolution to force a vote by the whole House.

Before They Were Lawmakers: Unique Careers of Some Senators and Representatives
Undercover Capitol takes you inside the historic workplace — one video at a time

House Immigration Compromise Faces Dim Prospects Amid Conservative Opposition
No compelling case for Freedom Caucus members to vote for it, Meadows says

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, is among the conservatives opposed to a compromise immigration bill that President Donald Trump has endorsed and that the House is expected to vote on this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A Republican immigration bill negotiated in recent weeks by cross sections of the House GOP Conference faces dim prospects for passage after several conservatives indicated opposition to the measure Tuesday.

House Republican leaders invited President Donald Trump to the Capitol on Tuesday evening to try to sell the legislation to the conference. And while Trump said he supports the compromise measure — along with one by House Judiciary Chairman Robert W. Goodlatte that most conservatives in the conference prefer — it does not appear to have swayed enough conservatives to ensure the bill’s passage.

House Democrats Rebuffed on Getting Census Documents
Quest to get answers on citizenship question blocked by party-line committee vote

Rep. Jimmy Gomez, D-Calif., says his resolution of inquiry was “about making sure we hold the administration accountable.” (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats tried this week to make the Commerce Department disclose documents about the decision-making behind a citizenship question on the 2020 census. But they were blocked by Republicans. 

The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on Wednesday voted 20-16 along party lines to reject the resolution of inquiry by California Democratic Rep. Jimmy Gomez and unfavorably report the measure. The vote prevents the resolution from moving to the House floor.

Small-Business Concerns Threaten GOP Tax Overhaul
Many Republicans worry small-business owners won’t see benefits

House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady and his committee might consider changes to the GOP tax bill’s small-business provisions to address members’ concerns. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Concerns from rank-and-file Republicans about small-business provisions in the House GOP tax bill are emerging as the biggest threats to the legislation’s passage in the chamber.

The specific concerns vary from the types of small businesses that will benefit from a reduced 25 percent tax rate to the amount of so-called pass-through income that will still be taxed at individual rates.

Word on the Hill: Weekend Plans?
McCain honored, and movies and tennis ahead

The Washington Nationals play the Atlanta Braves on Saturday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

You can spend your Saturday eating good food and watching baseball. The Washington Nationals are celebrating D.C.’s cosmopolitanism with the second annual Taste of the World celebration, billed as a culinary event heard ’round the world.

The participating embassies of Canada, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Honduras, Ireland, Qatar, Romania, and South Korea will serve food and drink samples starting at 1:30 p.m., followed by cultural dance performances at 2 p.m. Participants get to take home a set of Nationals salt-and-pepper shakers.

Photos of the Year, So Far: 186 Days Into a New Washington
The first half of 2017 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

JANUARY 26: President Donald Trump shakes hands with Speaker of the House Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., as he arrives on stage while Vice President Mike Pence looks on, at the GOP Congressional retreat in Philadelphia. House and Senate Republicans held their retreat there through Friday in Philadelphia. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Pool)

BY BILL CLARK and TOM WILLIAMS

2017 is now more than halfway complete. That's right, this weekend was the six-month mark on a year that’s brought a great deal of change to the nation’s capital.

Word on the Hill: Earth Day Celebrations
Smoothies and staffer shuffles

Tomorrow is the annual day to celebrate nature. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Happy Friday and last day of recess.

Tomorrow is the 47th annual Earth Day and here are ways you can celebrate Mother Nature.

Republican Members Opposed to GOP Health Care Bill
If the tally stands, it's enough to sink bill on House floor

Mark Meadows, chairman of the House Freedom Caucus, has led the charge to oppose the bill as unveiled by GOP leaders. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

CQ Roll Call has confirmed the following members as “no” votes on the American Health Care Act, absent further changes. If this tally stands on the floor, the bill will fail.

Late Wednesday, members of the House Freedom Caucus suggested negotiations with the White House were under way to make changes to the bill that would appease its members. No details of any deal were discussed by members leaving a meeting.