Jerrold Nadler

Former House Counsels Cast Doubt on GOP Subpoena in Justice Bias Probe
Differences in draft subpoena and final version ‘appear to be material,’ former counsels write in letter

House Judiciary ranking member Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., has called Republicans’ probe into potential FISA abuse and bias at the FBI and Department of Justice a “distraction” meant to undermine ongoing investigations into President Donald Trump’s associates possible ties to Russia. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Judiciary and Oversight and Government Reform committees’ investigation into possible bias among top Department of Justice and FBI officials appears to rely on an invalid subpoena, five previous House general counsels wrote in a letter to the leaders of the Judiciary Committee.

That would jeopardize any court proceedings that could arise from it — including charging Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein for contempt of Congress, a threat issued in July by House Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows of North Carolina.

Democrats Call Bologna on Meadows’ Strzok-Page Theory
Strzok, Page were not talking about leaking to the press, Democrats say — they were talking about combatting leaks

Former FBI Deputy Assistant Director Peter Strzok’s text messages with Department of Justice lawyer Lisa Page have been scrutinized for months by House Republicans. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats attempted to refute point-by-point a letter from GOP Rep. Mark Meadows to Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein in which Meadows claims text messages between a former FBI agent and a Justice Department lawyer recently released to Congress show there is a “systemic culture of media leaking by high-ranking officials” at the agencies.

But the fired FBI official Peter Strzok and DOJ lawyer Lisa Page were not texting about leaking information to the press — they were texting about combatting leaks, Democrats said Tuesday.

Democrats Defend DOJ’s Bruce Ohr Day After Republican Grilling
GOP meetings on potential bias at DOJ and FBI have Democrats crying foul

Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, D-Md., pictured above, and Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., the top Democrats on the Oversight and Judiciary committees, respectively, refuted House Republicans’ claims about Department of Justice official Bruce Ohr’s involvement in the so-called Steele dossier. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats on the House Judiciary and Oversight and Government Reform committees have jumped to the defense of Justice Department official Bruce Ohr, who met behind closed doors with Republican lawmakers Tuesday as part of their probe into potential bias at the top reaches of U.S. law enforcement.

Top Judiciary Democrat Jerrold Nadler of New York and Oversight ranking member Elijah E. Cummings said the private hearing with Ohr, the second of four meetings Republicans have scheduled with DOJ and FBI officials over the August recess, was meant to distract from President Donald Trump’s increasingly precarious legal position as special counsel Robert S. Mueller III secures guilty verdicts and plea agreements with multiple people in Trump’s inner circle.

Democrats Want ‘Impenetrable’ Case Against Trump Before Impeachment
As midterms loom, Dems don’t want to alienate moderate voters with impeachment chatter

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., and other Democratic leaders have avoided talking about any plans of impeachment of President Donald Trump. Instead, they’re urging members to wait until the special counsel has concluded its investigation into the 2016 Trump campaign and possible obstruction by the president. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

It’s not that Democrats would never try to impeach President Donald Trump. It’s that they just don’t want to talk about it — yet.

Under oath in a New York courtroom last Tuesday, the president’s former personal attorney, Michael Cohen, implicated his old boss in a crime, saying Trump directed him to violate campaign finance laws by paying off two of his mistresses, including adult film actress and director Stormy Daniels, with thousands of dollars in hush money.

Democrats Demand Oversight on Cohen Plea, Presidential Pardons
Judiciary Committee Dems want more information about investigations into Michael Cohen, other Trump associates

House Judiciary ranking member Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., and the 16 other Democrats on the committee asked Chairman Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., to conduct oversight over the Justice Department’s plea deal with Michael Cohen, former attorney for President Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee want to return to Washington from August recess a week early to address the new allegations that President Donald Trump violated campaign finance laws.

Trump’s former personal attorney, Michael Cohen, implicated the president for directing him to violate campaign finance laws while he pleaded guilty in court in a New York courtroom Tuesday to eight counts of campaign finance, bank fraud and tax fraud.

Nancy Pelosi Questions Trump Attacks on DoJ in Wake of Cohen Plea
Minority leader wants Judiciary Committee to investigate Trump‘s ’relentless assaults’ on the FBI, special counsel

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., says the fact that Trump former attorney Michael Cohen implicated the president in a federal crime raises questions about Trump's attacks on the Justice Department. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi is questioning the motivations behind President Donald Trump’s “relentless assaults” on the Department of Justice and the special counsel investigation after his former attorney Michael Cohen implicated him in a crime. 

“Michael Cohen’s admission to making illegal campaign contributions ‘at the direction of the candidate’ to influence the 2016 election, implicates President Trump in a federal crime and raises serious questions regarding the motive behind his continued attacks against the Department of Justice,” the California Democrat said. 

House Republicans Increase Messaging Votes Ahead of August Recess
GOP leaders prepare for break by seeking contrast with minority party

Rep. Tom MacArthur, R-N.J., sees value in some of the messaging votes the House will take up before the August recess. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House floor is seeing an uptick in messaging bills as Republicans prepare for a monthlong district work period in a midterm year when they are defending most of the seats in play.

Case in point was a resolution the House adopted Wednesday expressing support for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials and rejecting calls to abolish the agency — a stance some progressive Democrats are pushing.

House Passes Pro-ICE Resolution With Most Democrats Not Taking a Stance
Messaging vote provokes accusations back and forth across the aisle

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., wants people to notice how Democrats voted on the ICE resolution . (By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House on Wednesday adopted a resolution expressing support for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials and rejecting calls to abolish the agency with primarily Republican support as most Democrats voted “present.” The final vote was 244-35, with 133 Democrats voting present. 

Republicans readily acknowledged the vote was about putting Democrats on record as calls from left-wing members of the party have been dismissed by more moderate and establishment Democrats as unproductive. 

Facebook, Twitter, YouTube Say They Don't Censor Conservatives

Judiciary Chairman Robert W. Goodlatte, R-Va., and other Republicans are accusing social media companies of censoring conservatives, even as the firms have sought to crack down on fake accounts. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Executives from the world’s top social media companies tried to reassure Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee Tuesday that their platforms do not censor or control conservative content and commentary, contrary to assertions by some lawmakers about the companies’ practices.

While social media companies such as Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter have been removing false accounts, fake ads, and banning foreign government-owned propaganda outlets, lawmakers said some of them also have been restricting conservative content.

Goodlatte’s Threat to Hold Strzok in Contempt Most Likely an Empty One
U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia would decide whether to prosecute the charge

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., threatened FBI agent Peter Strzok with contempt of Congress in the opening minutes of Strzok’s first public testimony about his role in 2016 investigations into President Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Just minutes into FBI counterintelligence agent Peter Strzok’s first public testimony Thursday about his involvement in two 2016 FBI investigations involving presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte threatened Strzok with a contempt of Congress citation.

But if historical precedent is any indication, Goodlatte’s threat to the embattled witness would lead down a long and winding legal road — that would most likely dead-end at the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia’s desk.