Jeb Hensarling

Rising Stars 2017: Advocates
On the front lines in a new era

Seven advocates made the CQ Roll Call’s list of Rising Stars of 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

All this week, CQ Roll Call has been looking at 17 Rising Stars of 2017 — people who will now wield power and influence in a Washington that has been turned upside down by the presidency of Donald Trump.

Some of the names are familiar, others have recently burst on the scene. They include members of Congress, congressional and administration staffers, and advocates.

Tennessee, Texas Stand Out for Strengthened Hill Sway
In Roll Call’s Clout Index for this Congress, California delegation’s longtime hold on top spot is threatened

Party affiliation and longevity have helped propel members of the Tennessee delegation such as Sen. Bob Corker into positions that convey authority and power, Hawkings writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

No state in this decade has seen a more meaningful boost than Tennessee in institutionalized congressional influence.

Only eight states, all with much bigger delegations because they’re much more populous, have more overt sway at the Capitol this year. That is one of several notable findings from the new Roll Call Clout Index, which the newspaper uses to take a quantifiable measurement of every state’s potential for power at the start of each new Congress.  

Hensarling’s Offensive on Dodd-Frank Seen as Negotiating Move
Texas Republican’s new bill strips much more of CFPB’s authority

Texas Rep. Jeb Hensarling was considered by President Donald Trump for the Treasury secretary position. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Financial Services Chairman Jeb Hensarling appears to be doubling down on his Dodd-Frank repeal legislation, adding more features objectionable to Democrats in the wake of a White House announcement of a four-month review of the nation’s financial laws and regulations. 

In a staff memo circulated last week, Hensarling filled five single-spaced pages with changes to a bill approved by his committee in September 2016 over the opposition of every Democrat and one Republican. Among other things, the Texas Republican’s new bill would strip much more of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s authority than last year’s version.

Photos of the Week: Immigration Protests, Committee Boycotts and a High Court Nominee
The week of Jan. 30 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Protesters gather on Monday in front of the Supreme Court to oppose President Trump's executive order barring immigrants from certain countries entry into the U.S. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

BY TOM WILLIAMS AND BILL CLARK

A busy week in Washington started off with protests at Dulles International Airport and in front of the Supreme Court against President Donald Trump’s immigration executive order. Protests made it into the halls of Congress as well, as Senate Democrats boycotted several hearings for Trump’s Cabinet nominees. 

Conservatives: Lead Us Not Into Temptation
Republicans look to avoid earmark reinstatement once and for all

Texas Rep. John Culberson, seen here with presidential adviser Kellyanne Conaway at the inauguration last month, made an ill-fated effort to bring back earmarks. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Conservative lawmakers banded together Tuesday to send a message to their Republican colleagues: Don’t bring back earmarks.

“If you start going down this road, you will lose the House of Representatives,” Florida Rep. Ron DeSantis said at an anti-earmark event hosted by the Republican Study Committee.

Who’s Left to Fill Out Trump’s Cabinet?
President-elect continues to consider members of Congress from both sides of the aisle

President-elect Donald Trump announced Thursday that he would nominate retired Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis to be his secretary of Defense. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Updated Dec. 2, 3:31 p.m.

President-elect Donald Trump has announced who he’ll nominate for several of the high-profile positions for his incoming administration, but there's much speculation about who he'll put in the remaining spots. 

Hensarling Seen to Vie With Mnuchin for Trump Treasury Pick
An architect of legislation with GOP ties or an emissary to Wall Street?

Texas Rep. Jeb Hensarling has an important ally in Vice President-elect Mike Pence, chairman of the Trump transition team. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President-elect Donald Trump could face a classic choice between a Wall Street insider and a GOP strategist — investor Steve Mnuchin and House Financial Services Chairman, Texas Republican Jeb Hensarling — as he moves to replace outgoing Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew.

Trump advisers such as investor Carl Icahn and Stephen Moore, a visiting fellow at the Heritage Foundation, describe Mnuchin, Trump’s campaign finance director, as the front-runner for the Treasury post. But GOP allies of Hensarling — including Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, Sen. Ted Cruz and former Sen. Phil Gramm, all fellow Texans — say they believe Hensarling has emerged as a strong challenger after meeting with Trump on Thursday.

Trump‘s Treasury Hopefuls Steeped in Wall Street Experience
Some pushback from liberals expected

House Financial Services Chairman Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas, has been mentioned as a possible pick for Donald Trump’s Cabinet. But “serving in his Cabinet is not something I’ve indicated an interest in and it’s not something I am pursuing,” he said. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President-elect Donald Trump's potential candidates for Treasury secretary are being praised for their business experience, while consumer advocates are probing their past investments and work on Wall Street.

Steve Moore, an economic adviser to Trump, said in an interview that Steve Mnuchin, the Republican's campaign finance chairman and a former Goldman Sachs executive, would be a front-runner for Treasury secretary. Other potential candidates could include billionaire investor Wilbur Ross, chairman of a private equity firm, and Lawrence Kudlow, a CNBC commentator and former chief economist for Bear Stearns, according to Moore.

Ryan, Praised for Inclusiveness, Faces Hurdles Seeking Another Speaker Term
Conservatives say they'll weigh elections results, lame-duck action

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan touts the House Republican policy agenda after a GOP conference meeting in September. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Paul D. Ryan’s first as year as House speaker played out like a roller coaster. But despite the rocky ride, the Wisconsin Republican reaches his one-year anniversary Oct. 29 earning relatively high marks from many in his caucus.

Praised for bringing a more inclusive leadership style to the fractious House GOP conference, Ryan, 46, is widely expected to seek another term as speaker during the upcoming lame-duck session, despite talk of opposition from more conservative lawmakers and grousing from some of the Republican faithful about his contortions over Donald Trump's presidential bid.

RSC Founders Endorse Andy Harris Over Mark Walker in Chairman Race
With election on Nov. 17, Rep. Walker still has time to make his case

Republican Study Committee founders cited Maryland Rep. Andy Harris's three terms of experience as a conservative leader in the House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Six Republican Study Committee founders and current Chairman Bill Flores on Thursday effectively endorsed three-term Rep. Andy Harris of Maryland to be the next chairman of the conservative caucus.

Harris, who is a member of both the RSC and the more conservative House Freedom Caucus, is running against freshman North Carolina Rep. Mark Walker.