Iowa

Word on the Hill: The Day Before
Details about getting around D.C.

Workers put the finishing touches on the platform at the Capitol on Tuesday for Donald Trump's inauguration. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Tomorrow is Donald Trump’s big day and the bulk of state society parties take place tonight.

Check out our list of this evening’s balls and galas and tips for making the most of the next couple of days.

House Republican Women See a Boost in Authority
3 committees, other powerful posts newly under control of 21-person caucus

Texas Rep. Kay Granger is the new chairwoman of the Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, which drives the allocation of more than half a trillion dollars annually to the military. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

For the past four years, Republicans endured pointed barbs about how the only woman with a House committee gavel was presiding over the fittingly sexist-sounding “housekeeping committee,” the Hill’s nickname for the panel overseeing the Capitol’s internal operations.

That’s not a fair jape anymore. Exactly a century after the arrival of the first female elected to Congress, Jeannette Rankin of Montana, her GOP successors will be wielding more titular power in the Republican-run House than ever. Women will soon be presiding over three standing committees, a record for the party, while a fourth has taken over what’s arguably the chamber’s single most consequential subcommittee, because it takes the lead in apportioning more than half of all discretionary federal spending.

Crisis Averted but Future Is Still Unclear for House Watchdog
Republicans promise bipartisan review of Office of Congressional Ethics

Massachusetts Rep. Michael Capuano, who chaired the committee that recommended the creation of the Office of Congressional Ethics, says he would welcome looking at potential revisions to the office. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

House Republicans might have ditched a plan to gut the Office of Congressional Ethics. But the future of Congress’ only outside ethics review board is far from guaranteed.

The Office of Congressional Ethics, or OCE, has been under fire from both parties since it was created eight years ago. Now the House GOP majority is promising to revisit a potential overhaul before the end of this session, possibly as early as August.

Photos of the Week: Confirmation Hearing Frenzy on Capitol Hill
The week of Jan. 9 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee for attorney general, and Chairman Charles E. Grassley, R-Iowa, prepare for Sessions’ Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in Russell Building’s Kennedy Caucus Room on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A total of seven confirmation hearings for President-elect Donald Trump’s Cabinet picks kicked off on the Hill this week. Meanwhile, a back-and-forth erupted between the parties over a student painting being taken down from the Cannon House Office Building.

House GOP Group Launches Digital Campaign for Health Care Plan
American Action Network will target 28 House districts

American Action Network is running digital ads about the House Republicans’ health care law replacement efforts in Ohio’s 4th District, held by former Freedom Caucus Chairman Jim Jordan. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

An outside group affiliated with House GOP leadership is ramping up its advertising campaign for a Republican alternative to the 2010 health care law, running $400,000 in digital ads across 28 congressional districts. 

American Action Network, a conservative nonprofit advocacy organization, is launching its first digital campaign of the year Friday, when the House is expected to vote on the budget resolution that would begin the process of repealing President Barack Obama’s signature health care law. 

Booker, Lewis Challenge Sessions’ Commitment to Civil Rights
Say AG nominee has no track record of championing cause

From left, Louisiana Rep. Cedric L. Richmond of Louisiana, Georgia Rep. John Lewis and New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker attend the second day of Senate Judiciary confirmation hearings for Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions, President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee for attorney general. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Three black lawmakers forcefully testified against Sen. Jeff Sessions becoming attorney general on Wednesday, closing out a confirmation hearing in which Democrats aired concerns about the Alabama Republican’s civil rights record.

Georgia Democratic Rep. John Lewis, a civil rights icon, expressed concern with Sessions’ commitment to enforcing the Voting Rights Act of 1965, passed in the wake of a violent law enforcement reaction against Lewis and others marching from Selma to Montgomery. Lewis participated in that Alabama march known as “Bloody Sunday.”

Democrats to Grill Sessions on Race, Civil Rights
NAACP cites prosecution of three black voting rights advocates

Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley meets with fellow committee member and Attorney General nominee Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., in his Capitol Hill office on Nov. 29. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Democrats will turn the tables this week on Attorney General nominee Jeff Sessions, a former federal prosecutor who often doggedly questioned executive branch nominees during his 20 years on the Judiciary Committee.

Don’t expect them to go easy on their colleague as the Alabama Republican's two days of confirmation hearings start Tuesday.

Blum Mocks Democrats Over Russian Hacking
Democratic group says it takes one to know one

Rep. Rod Blum, R-Iowa, joked Democrats couldn’t “hack” the cold weather in Washington. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Rod Blum, R-Iowa, mocked Democrats over the Russian hacking scandal with a joke about the Democratic National Committee on his Facebook page.

Blum posted a photo on his Sunday saying, “Walked to work past DNC HQ this afternoon. Nobody there — I guess they couldn't ‘hack’ this cold weather!”

Photos of the Week: Biden Schmoozes Through Last Swearing-In, Pence and Obama on the Hill
The week of Jan. 3 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. greets Barbara Grassley, wife of Iowa Sen. Charles E. Grassley, during the swearing-in ceremony in the Capitol’s Old Senate Chamber on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

BY BILL CLARK AND TOM WILLIAMS

The 115th Congress has officially convened and members have been sworn in. While Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. is officially on his way out, he didn’t go quietly. His last Senate swearing in was filled with hugs, stories, selfies, and, yes, kisses.

Schumer Seeks Inquiry Into HHS Nominee’s Health Stock Trades
Asks whether Price’s position in the House aided him in his trades.

Democratic Sens. Ron Wyden of Oregon, Patty Murray of Washington and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York hold a news conference to discuss the nomination of Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga., to be secretary of the Health and Human Services Department, in the U.S. Capitol on Thursday, Jan. 5, 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer on Thursday called for an investigation into the trading of medical industry stocks by President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee to lead the Department of Health and Human Services. The Trump transition team responded by highlighting recent trading in pharmaceutical stocks by three Democratic senators.

Schumer, a New York Democrat, asked that the House Office of Congressional Ethics look into Price’s trading in health care stocks, an issue that Roll Call investigated in a story last month. Price last year traded shares of firms such as Gilead Sciences, Aetna and CVS Health Corp, while serving on the Ways and Means Health Subcommittee.