independents

President Escalates Feud with Media, Will Skip Annual D.C. Gala
Trump uses tweet to announce he won’t attend White House Correspondents Dinner

Eric Trump shares a laugh with ABC’s Jonathan Karl at last year’s White House Correspondents Association Dinner. On Saturday, his father, now the president, announced he will not attend. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump used a Saturday tweet to announce he will not attend this year’s White House Correspondents Association Dinner, his latest salvo in his simmering clash with the media.

By using the social media site, the president took the news directly to the public and went around the press in another symbolic jab at media outlets. He made the announcement one day after his White House excluded some organizations, including CNN, Time and CQ Roll Call, from a “gaggle” with Press Secretary Sean Spicer, and after Trump lambasted the press as “enemies of the people.”

Trump White House Lets First Routine Week Slip Away
Administration clashes with reporters over invitation-only Q&A session

Trump walks to the Oval Office after arriving back at the White House after his CPAC speech on Friday. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

The Trump White House was close to pulling off its first drama-free week after a month of chaos, but on Friday, the new administration reverted to the norm.

The new president and his team seemed to be settling in over the last seven days. Donald Trump quickly named a new, well-respected national security adviser. They held off on a coming executive order limiting who can enter the country so relevant federal agencies could weigh in. And senior White House officials stayed on message.

Democratic Group Targets 2018 GOP Senators on Russia
American Bridge pressuring Flake and Heller to support independent investigation

American Bridge 21st Century is targeting Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake and Nevada Sen. Dean Heller to support an independent investigation into Russia and the 2016 election. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

A Democratic super PAC is targeting two GOP senators up for re-election in 2018, urging them to back an independent investigation into President Donald Trump’s ties to Russia. 

American Bridge 21st Century is launching a two-week digital ad campaign Thursday against Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake and Nevada Sen. Dean Heller, with plans to expand the campaign to other platforms. The ads are targeted to “engaged voters” of all parties and direct voters to a petition calling on the senators to support an independent investigation. 

Intelligence Committee Could Subpoena Trump Tax Returns
Susan Collins says panel will go where Russia inquiry leads it

Maine Sen. Susan Collins is confident the Intelligence Committee will be able to conduct a thorough investigation into alleged Russian hacking. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Susan Collins said she thinks the Intelligence Committee could subpoena President Donald Trump’s tax records as part of its investigation into Russian interference in last year’s election if that’s where the evidence leads.

“I don’t know whether we will need to do that,” the Maine Republican said Wednesday. “If it’s necessary to get to the answers, then I suspect that we would.”

With No Vote in Congress, D.C. Residents Find Power in Cash
District voters are supporting Jason Chaffetz’s challenger in Utah

Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz is fast becoming a target of Washington, D.C., residents, upset about his efforts to overturn local laws. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It was only the second political contribution Sarah Carr had made in her life. A $100 gift to an obscure politician from a distant state whose values hardly align with her own.

But Carr, a 41-year-old marine scientist who lives on Capitol Hill, had a clear goal: she wanted to support anyone who might oust Utah Republican Rep. Jason Chaffetz.

Opinion: Trump Is Neck and Neck With the Worst Presidents
Could he even make Warren G. Harding look good?

Even Warren G. Harding had a better first month than President Donald Trump, Walter Shapiro writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

DUBLIN — A long holiday weekend in Ireland proved to be less of an escape and more of a reminder of the omnipresence of the 45th president. The front page of the Sunday Independent featured a column by conservative writer and media personality Brendan O’Connor that began, “Ireland 2021. The country has been laid waste to after Donald Trump caused nuclear Armageddon.”

Supreme Court Nominee Gorsuch’s Hearings to Begin March 20
The judge will face lawmakers on March 21

Supreme Court nominee Judge Neil Gorsuch looks on as Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, speaks to reporters following their meeting in the Capitol. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley announced Thursday that the confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Neil Gorsuch will begin March 20.

Grassley's office indicated in a statement that the opening statements will take place on Monday, March 20, and Gorsuch will face the committee the following day. The hearings are expected to last three to four days and include testimony from outside experts.

Like Democrats Before Them, GOP Dismisses Town Hall Threat
There’s little data to gauge electoral threat protests pose for 2018

New Jersey Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen says he’ll be sticking with tele-town halls for the near future. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Ask Republican lawmakers about the specter of protests in their districts next week, and they’ll likely shrug off constituent outbursts as “manufactured” or “scripted.” 

The GOP is largely adopting the Democratic posture from the summer of 2009 that angry voices at town halls don’t represent a political threat. That may be true. The question is how Republicans now, and Democrats back then, arrived at that conclusion. 

Wisconsin’s Sean Duffy Will Forgo Senate Bid
Other potential candidates had been waiting on congressman’s decision

Rep. Sean Duffy announced he’s passing on a challenge to Democratic Sen. Tammy Baldwin. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Update 9:35 a.m. Feb. 16 with Duffy announcement

Wisconsin Rep. Sean P. Duffy announced Thursday he will pass on a run for Senate in 2018.

Congress Split on How to Proceed on Flynn
House, Senate lawmakers differ on probe of former national security adviser

Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., center, Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., conduct a news conference Wednesday in the Capitol on investigating former national security adviser Michael Flynn. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Lawmakers who oversee intelligence are struggling with how to investigate reports that former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn had inappropriate contact with Russian officials and later misled the White House about it.

The top Republican and Democrat on the House Select Intelligence Committee offered dueling perspectives on a path forward on their panel’s probe; Senate Democrats coalesced around a plan with the Intelligence Committee taking the lead, something their GOP colleagues support; Senate Democrats also said the Judiciary Committee could play an investigatory role, and some lawmakers are still sending signals they want an independent commission in on the action.