impeachment

New Trump call emerges in Taylor's testimony

William Taylor, the senior U.S. diplomat to Ukraine, testifies Wednesday at the House Intelligence Committee hearing on the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

William Taylor, the acting U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, on Wednesday told members of the House Intelligence Committee that he had recently learned about a July 26 phone call between President Donald Trump and Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union.

Taylor told the committee that one of his aides asked Sondland after the phone call about the president’s thoughts on Ukraine. Sondland replied, “President Trump cares more about the investigations of [former Vice President Joe] Biden,” according to Taylor’s account of the aide’s conversation.

Democrats hope impeachment support grows but proceeding regardless of public sentiment
Public support is important but members' constitutional duty is more so, Democrats say

House Intelligence Chairman Adam B.  Schiff, D-Calif., joined by other House Democrats, speaks during a press conference after the House Intelligence Committee hearing on the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump on Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats hope the open impeachment hearings they began Wednesday will convince the public that President Donald Trump has committed impeachable offenses, but if the proceedings fail to produce an increase in public support, it won’t stop or slow down their inquiry.

More than half a dozen Democrats interviewed Wednesday — as the Intelligence Committee held its first of what will be at least five days of public testimony from 11 witnesses — said their decisions on whether to impeach Trump will not be influenced by polls capturing public sentiment.

Woof, impeachment hearings are stressful. We have a solution

Roll Call reporter Kathryn Lyons interviews Lola, a therapy dog, during an event run by Pet Partners and the Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council to help provide staffers stress relief. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Donald Trump's alleged misdeeds with Ukraine are front and center on Capitol Hill today as Congress holds its first public impeachment inquiry hearing.  So, Heard on the Hill decided to make a ruff day better with a trio of therapy dogs stationed just one office building away.

Trump complains about cost of Democrats’ impeachment lawyer — but GOP lawyer made more
President launched a series of Twitter attacks before public testimony began

President Donald Trump complained that Democrats hired a high-priced “outside lawyer” for the impeachment hearing — but the Republicans’ lawyer appears to have been paid more this year. (OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images file photo)

Ahead of the first public impeachment hearing Wednesday, President Donald Trump complained in a tweet about the “high priced outside lawyer” that Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., picked to question witnesses.

There was just one problem: The Republican impeachment lawyer has made more this year.

Road ahead: Public impeachment hearings begin
Senate set to confirm new Homeland Security secretary

The first open impeachment hearings in over 20 years begin on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The public phase of the House impeachment inquiry begins this week, with three witnesses set to air concerns Wednesday and Friday that President Donald Trump attempted to tie Ukrainian military aid to an investigation of former Vice President Joe Biden, a potential Democratic rival in 2020.

Much of the attention on Capitol Hill will be focused on the House Intelligence Committee as it opens up to televised questioning and testimony an investigation that so far had been conducted in a secure closed-door facility in the basement of the Capitol.

If members can't be impeached, how are they disciplined?

Rep. Charles B. Rangel, D-N.Y., waits for the start of the House Standards of Official Conduct hearing on what sanctions should be brought against him. He was found guilty on multiple counts of ethics violations by a House ethics subcommittee. (Scott J. Ferrell/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump's alleged misdeeds have seized headlines recently with the impeachment inquiry in full swing.

Secret ’Stache

Imitation Bernie, peeking on camera and too many Alaskans of the Week: Congressional Hits and Misses
Week of Nov. 4, 2019

Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., leaves the Senate Republicans’ lunch in the Capitol on Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

McCarthy temporarily puts Jordan on Intelligence Committee for impeachment hearings
Jordan will replace Rick Crawford, who will get his seat back impeachment proceedings conclude

Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan will serve on the Intelligence Committee during public impeachment proceedings. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Oversight ranking member Jim Jordan will serve on the Intelligence Committee during public impeachment proceedings, temporarily replacing fellow Republican Rick Crawford, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy announced Friday.

Jordan has been the leading Republican in the closed-door impeachment inquiry depositions that have been conducted jointly by the House Intelligence, Oversight and Foreign Affairs panels. Under procedures the House approved Oct. 31, the Intelligence Committee will be the sole panel participating in the public hearings. (Later, the Judiciary Committee, which Jordan is already on, will conduct additional public proceedings for considering articles of impeachment.)

Kennedy defends calling Pelosi ‘dumb’ at Trump rally
“I didn’t mean it as disrespectful at all,” Kennedy said

Sen. John Kennedy said he ”didn’t mean it as disrespectful at all“ when he called Speaker Nancy Pelosi ”dumb” at a rally on Wednesday night. (Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call)