Immigration

Trump Defiant on Alleged Phone Tapping, Upbeat on Health Bill
POTUS: Efforts to get House GOP health care votes going beautifully

Trump holds a joint press conference with Merkel in the East Room of the White House on Friday. He appeared to repeat his claim that for President Obama tapped his phones, and said Republicans are coming together around a health care overhaul bill. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

An ever-defiant President Donald Trump on Friday doubled down on his claim that Barack Obama’s administration tapped his phones, telling German Chancellor Angela Merkel the duo might both be victims of Obama-led spying.

“As far as wiretapping, at least we have something in common, perhaps,” Trump quipped in the ornate East Room. The U.S. and German journalists, staff members and dignitaries responded with laughter — and some gasps.

Members See Green
How they’re celebrating St. Patrick’s Day

New York Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney at a previous St. Patrick’s Day celebration. (Photo courtesy of Maloney’s office)

It’s St. Patrick’s Day and plenty of members of Congress are celebrating their heritage.

On Thursday, many showed up at the office by wearing Irish flag ties, green blazers, dresses, and accessories.

White House Border Wall Request Sets Up Clash With Democrats
Trump seeks $1.5B in 2017 supplemental, followed by $2.6B in 2018 budget request

A barrier at the border of Tijuana, Mexico, and San Diego. The crosses represent migrants who died trying to cross into the United States. The Trump administration wants $1.5 billion this fiscal year from Congress to start building the president's promised massive border barrier. (Photo © Tomas Castelazo/www.tomascastelazo.com/Wikimedia Commons)

The White House is asking Congress -- not Mexico -- for $4.1 billion to begin constructing President Donald Trump’s promised massive wall along America’s border with its southern neighbor. But the request threatens to shutter the entire federal government.

The administration wants $2.6 billion for wall-related tasks as part of its budget blueprint for fiscal 2018, and $1.5 billion it could get and spending on the controversial project even sooner via an emergency spending package for the current fiscal year.

Federal Judges Block Trump’s Modified Travel Ban
President says ruling ‘makes us look weak’

Demonstrators hold signs at Dulles International Airport on Jan. 29 to protest President Donald Trump’s first executive order on immigration. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Federal judges in Hawaii and Maryland issued nationwide temporary restraining orders halting President Donald Trump’s revised travel ban, with one coming just hours before the executive action was set to go into effect.

A decision Wednesday by U.S. District Judge Derrick K. Watson in Hawaii was the second such ruling against Trump’s efforts to block temporarily certain immigrants, refugees and travelers from Muslim-majority nations from entering the country. A judge in Washington state blocked the original travel ban, which was broader in scope, shortly after it was signed Jan. 27.

Trump’s Travel Order Opens Door to Targeting More Countries
Order also mandates data collection on honor killings in the U.S.

A passenger from a Saudi Arabian Airlines flight from Jeddah arrives at Dulles International Airport on Jan. 29 to demonstrators protesting President Donald Trump’s first executive order on immigration. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Pool file photo)

President Donald Trump’s modified executive order on travel and refugees creates requirements for a stream of reports that could lead to more countries being targeted for visa restrictions and a new effort to tally the prevalence of honor killings in the United States.

Trump’s order takes effect Thursday and will stop the issuance of new U.S. visas to nationals of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen for three months. It also halts the arrival of refugees for four months while the State, Homeland Security and Justice departments review and tighten entry procedures for foreigners.

Take Five: Pramila Jayapal
Washington Democrat wants hearings on bills before committee votes

Washington Rep. Pramila Jayapal brings her special green tea from home. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Washington Democratic Rep. Pramila Jayapal, 51, talks about breaking barriers, what surprises her as a freshman in Congress, and working on airplanes.

Q: What has surprised you so far about being in Congress?

Reps. Hurd and O’Rourke Make Bipartisan Buddy Movie
“The longest cross-country livestream town hall in the history of the world’

Democratic Rep. Beto O’Rourke, left, and Republican Rep. Will Hurd left San Antonio at 7 a.m. CDT Tuesday. (Courtesy Rep. Beto O’Rourke’s Facebook page)

With a major winter storm on the East Coast canceling flights across the country, two congressmen decided to have a bipartisan adventure on their way back to Washington.

Democrat Beto O’Rourke and Republican Will Hurd rented a car and left San Antonio at 7 a.m. CDT on the road to D.C.

Opinion: Paul Ryan and the Danger of Keeping Unworkable Promises
GOP could pay a political price in 2018 with repeal and replace push

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan’s rationale for a health care overhaul conflicts with where most Americans stand on the issue, Shapiro writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Paul Ryan quote from “Face the Nation” on Sunday so appealed to the speaker’s press office that it became the headline of a Monday morning press release. Referring to Obamacare, Ryan said, “We made a promise to the people who elected us, we would repeal and replace this law. … And now we are keeping our word.”

Promises made, promises kept. It sounds so inspiring. But for all the political pride in adhering to campaign promises, what usually matters far more to the voters are their personal priorities rather than those of politicians.

McCaul Worries Immigration Rhetoric Hurting Border Economies
Represents a district along the U.S.-Mexico border

House Homeland Security Chairman Michael McCaul, R-Texas, said he wants to make sure trade policies doesn't hurt local economies. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Texas Republican Rep. Michael McCaul wants to make sure that rhetoric surrounding Mexico and immigration does not hurt border region economies.

McCaul, who is chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, spoke with NPR about concerns from local elected officials and businesspeople that President Donald Trump’s talk about the border has reduced tax revenue in McAllen.

Democrats Warn of Showdown Over Trump’s Border Wall
Senate Democratic leaders say there’s no plan for construction or getting Mexico to pay for it

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer is warning of a funding standoff over building President Donald Trump's wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Democrats are warning Republicans of a shutdown showdown if President Donald Trump insists on including funding for a wall along the Mexican border in April’s government funding bill.

“We believe it would be inappropriate to insist on the inclusion of such funding in a must-pass appropriations bill that is needed for the Republican majority in control of the Congress to avert a government shutdown so early in President Trump’s Administration,” the Senate Democratic leadership team, along with Appropriations ranking Democrat Patrick J. Leahy of Vermont, wrote in a letter to be circulated Monday.