House Republicans

Ryan, Pence Promise Tax Overhaul but Offer Few Details
Speaker, vice president ramp up rhetoric on taxes

Vice President Mike Pence and Speaker Paul D. Ryan, pictured together before President Donald Trump’s address to Congress in February, spoke about overhauling the tax code during a National Association of Manufacturers summit Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Vice President Mike Pence on Tuesday reiterated a commitment to overhauling the tax code this year but offered no new details on how they plan to do so. 

In separate addresses to a National Association of Manufacturers summit, Ryan and Pence said 2017 is the year Congress will rework the tax system. 

Prospect of Repeat Budget Failure Puts Pressure on Republicans
Budget needed for GOP to get to tax overhaul, possibly mandatory spending cuts

House Budget Chairwoman Diane Black, seen here at a committee hearing last month with ranking Democrat John Yarmuth, is confident Republicans will pass a budget this year, despite GOP divisions. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans face the possibility of failing to pass a full budget resolution for the second year in a row, despite making progress on their goals for a fiscal 2018 budget resolution.

The stakes are much higher than last year as the budget, through the reconciliation process, has become a tool for Republicans to advance legislation without Democratic support, something they lack on nearly all of their top priorities.

Scalise Still in Critical Condition But Vitals are Stabilized
Doctor says internal bleeding under control

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., remains in critical condition after being shot Wednesday during Republicans’ congressional baseball practice in Alexandria. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

By Lindsey McPherson and Niels Lesniewski 

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise remains in critical condition in the intensive care unit at MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Dr. Jack Sava, the hospital’s director of trauma, said Friday. 

Analysis: Why the Border Adjustment Tax Is Dead and an Overhaul Could Be Too
Proponents have failed to address critics’ concerns; lack of alternatives make overhaul difficult

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, right, and Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, left, have pushed the border adjustment tax as a way to raise roughly $1 trillion in revenue to partially offset an ambitious corporate tax rate cut. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republican leaders’ controversial border adjustment tax is dead, and as a result, their plans to dramatically overhaul the tax code could soon be too. 

The border adjustment tax, or BAT, is a proposal to tax imports instead of exports, reversing the way the United States currently taxes goods crossing its borders. House GOP leaders, namely Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, have pushed for the tax as a way to discourage U.S. companies from moving operations overseas and to raise roughly $1 trillion in revenue to partially offset an ambitious corporate tax rate cut.

Griffith Emerging As House Republican Bridge Builder
Colleagues say Virginia Republican is helping overcome divides within the GOP conference

Virginia Rep. Morgan Griffith has drawn praise from his colleagues for his willingness to work toward solutions and compromise. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In a political world where perfectionism can often earn you a bad reputation as an obstructionist, Rep. Morgan Griffith has managed to do the opposite.

Colleagues say the Virginia Republican, a member of the hard-line conservative House Freedom Caucus, has shown a willingness to compromise and work toward solutions on legislative and procedural problems. But they also describe the four-term lawmaker as a principled perfectionist whose attention to detail has been an asset, not a hindrance.

Western North Carolina Notices Meadows’ Newfound Notoriety
Supporters and protesters greet Freedom Caucus chairman back home

Rep. Mark Meadows gives advice to middle school students in McDowell County, North Carolina preparing for a cardboard boat competition. (Lindsey McPherson/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Mark Meadows has long been a household name in western North Carolina, but his newfound notoriety outside the 11th District has not gone unnoticed by those back home.

“If you watch TV at all you know that our congressman is very much a mover and shaker in Washington, D.C.,” South Caldwell High School teacher Tony Crump said, as he introduced Meadows at a masonry competition Thursday for three area high schools.

House Sends Health Care Hot Potato to Senate
Every Democrat, several Republicans, vote against measure

Speaker Paul D. Ryan and his leadership team were able to secure enough votes for passage of their health care plan. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

BY LINDSEY MCPHERSON AND ERIN MERSHON

House Republicans breathed a sigh of relief Thursday as they finally advanced their health care overhaul out of the chamber in a narrow 217-213 vote. No Democrats voted for the measure. They were joined by 20 Republicans who voted “no” as well.

Tax Overhaul Not Immune to GOP Infighting
Border adjustment tax among issues that could cause intraparty stress

House Republicans may experience significant intraparty disagreements over their upcoming tax overhaul effort. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Republicans have said a tax code rewrite will be easier than the health care overhaul that continues to elude them. Whether or not that proves true, a few intraparty battles likely lay ahead on taxes.

The GOP is united around the goal of a tax code overhaul. Republican lawmakers used Tax Day on Tuesday to highlight their shared vision for cutting tax rates, simplifying the code and spurring economic growth.

Funding Deadline Tests GOP Strategy
Republicans hoped for more under Trump, but still need Democrats’ help

From left, Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, President Donald Trump and House Speaker Paul D. Ryan meet for a working lunch at the White House on March 1. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images file photo)

When Republicans kicked the fiscal 2017 spending deadline into April last December, House Speaker Paul D. Ryan said they’d rather negotiate with incoming GOP President Donald Trump than the outgoing Democratic one.

But now, congressional Republicans are talking about largely ignoring requests from the White House as they negotiate with Democrats over a spending bill to take the government off autopilot for the remaining five months of the fiscal year.

Analysis: Moderate Republicans Also to Blame for Health Care Impasse
Arguably more hard ‘no’ votes among moderates than conservatives

Tuesday Group Co-Chairman Charlie Dent is among the moderate Republicans unlikely to be convinced to vote for the GOP’s health care bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Conservatives in the House Freedom Caucus have shouldered the majority of the blame for the Republicans’ failure to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law, but GOP moderates may be equally — if not more — responsible for the impasse. 

There are arguably more hard “no” votes (members not likely to be convinced to move to “yes”) for the GOP leadership’s plan among moderate Republicans than there are among Freedom Caucus members.