Hillary Clinton

Democratic Lawmakers Feel Boost from Women’s March
Minority party hopes movement will help Congress rein in Trump

Protesters march down Independence Avenue in Washington, holding signs during the women’s march on Saturday, the day after the inauguration of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Capitol Dome was more than just a symbolic backdrop for Saturday’s Women’s March on Washington. It was the intended target of hundreds of thousands of voices of frustration with President Donald Trump. 

For all of the anti-Trump placards — both crude and shrewd — many marchers descended on the nation’s capital to send a message to the branch of government that, they hope, will be a check on the new president.

Trump and Schumer Begin the Battle of New York
Trent Lott sees similarities to his relationship with Clinton

Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th president of the United States by Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. on the West Front of the Capitol as his family looks on. His relationship with Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer will go a long way toward determining how much Congress can get done. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

New Yorkers pride themselves on being brash and tough, and that was obvious in the give and take on Inauguration Day between the newly minted 45th president of the United States, Donald Trump, and his chief antagonist, Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer.

And for at least one former Senate opposition leader, the back and forth between the two all seems quite familiar, and a good harbinger.

Statuary Lunch Hall a Model of Make-Nice Decorum
After fiery campaign and inaugural speech

A U.S. Capitol Police officer takes a photo as a Marine helicopter carrying former President Barack Obama and former First Lady Michelle Obama lifts off from the East Plaza of the U.S. Capitol following the swearing in of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

After former President Barack Obama took off on a military chopper from the East Front of the Capitol, President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence joined congressional leaders and other dignitaries for one of Inauguration Day’s more intimate moments, far from the crowds.

At the traditional luncheon in Statuary Hall honoring the new president, attendees at the event — one of the hottest tickets in town — feasted on lobster and steak, with pairings of California wines.

Chaffetz Trolls Clinton on Inauguration Day
‘So pleased she's not the president’

Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, shakes hands with Hillary Clinton at Donald Trump’s inauguration. (Fox News/Rep. Jason Chaffetz/Instagram).

Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, got one last dig at Hillary Clinton during the inauguration of President Donald Trump on Friday.

Chaffetz posted a photo of a screen shot from Fox News of him shaking the former secretary of State’s hand. While on the surface it may look magnanimous, the caption that the chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee put was not as gracious:

The Final Dignity of Hillary Clinton
An example for the nation: Time to move forward

Hillary Clinton, seen here at inauguration, shows America again and again that it’s returning from failure that matters, Murphy writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

I can’t remember how many times in the last three months I have typed “the final indignity of Hillary Clinton.” Even for a woman who has been in the spotlight for decades, she seems to have had more than her fair share.

Had she not run for the Senate as first lady, it’s possible that Clinton’s final indignity would have been her husband’s betrayals, literally in the Oval Office, after she had supported him for years. But after a failed impeachment against him and a New York listening tour for her, “Mrs. Clinton” became “Sen. Clinton” and she was on her way to a political career of her own.

At Trump Inauguration, Even the Rain Strikes Partisan Notes
Members of Congress see different signs at inaugural ceremony

President Donald Trump addresses the crowd after being sworn in as the 45th President of the United States on the West Front of the Capitol. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Highlights of Donald Trump’s Inauguration
Bushes arrive for 45th president’s swearing in

President Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th president of the United States by Chief Justice John Roberts on the West Front of the Capitol on Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The inauguration of President Donald Trump was full of both Trump bombast and the ceremonial pomp and circumstance that comes with the swearing in of a new commander in chief.

On one end, many worked to uphold the democratic traditions while Trump sought to drive home the points of his inauguration.

New Yorkers Celebrated Inauguration With or Without Trump
New York State Society’s bipartisan event included a little Trump memorabilia

New Yorkers party at the New York State Society Inaugural Celebration on the eve of Donald Trump’s inauguration at the Fairmont Hotel in Washington on Thursday. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Donald Trump’s home state of New York held its state society inaugural party the night before his inauguration but the president-elect was barely a part of it. 

Despite rumors that Trump would make an appearance at the party, New York Republican Rep. Chris Collins said the incoming president was still at an event at Union Station, which the congressman had just left.

Good Trump, Bad Trump — Who Will Appear at the Inaugural?
No guarantee what president-elect will say Friday

Listening to President-elect Donald Trump’s past speeches gives one the sense of a political leader torn between a good angel on his right shoulder and a malevolent demon on his left, Walter Shapiro writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

No matter how many drafts speechwriter Stephen Miller prepares, no matter how often the president-elect practices with a teleprompter, there is no guarantee what Donald Trump will say on Friday after he takes the oath of office. The man who is about to become the 45th president is too impulsive, too much of a creature of his own id, to be slavishly faithful to the final draft of the inaugural address. 

The majesty of the moment, the hand-on-the-Bible jolt of emotion for this child of Outer-Borough America, could send Trump in unexpected directions. Even an orator who revels in huge rallies, as Trump does, may be surprised — as Bill Clinton was in 1993 — at the way his oratory echoes off the monuments and how indistinct the faces of his audience appear as he gazes down from the heights of the West Front of the Capitol.

10 Quotes From the Last 10 Presidential Inaugurations
Every four years on Jan. 20, the country listens as the president looks toward the future

President Barack Obama waves to crowd after his speech at his second inauguration in 2013. (Scott Andrews/Pool/AP file photo)

It’s a ritual that’s been repeated many times over. On Friday, President-elect Donald Trump will take the oath of office and give his inaugural address. Here are some memorable quotes and photos from the last 10 times this was done.

1. Jan. 20, 1977: Jimmy Carter