Health Care Law

Ep. 38: The Prickly Road Ahead for Repealing Obamacare
The Week Ahead

CQ Roll Call Health reporter Joe Williams brings us up to speed on the developments of Republican efforts to decimate Obamacare, what came out of the GOP policy retreat in Philadelphia and whether President Donald Trump’s executive order makes any difference.

Show Notes:

Ryan Still Doesn't Want to Run for President
Speaker says ‘the left’ is trying to delegitimize Trump’s presidency before it starts

Speaker Paul D. Ryan insists he still does not want to run for president. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan has been asked hundreds, if not thousands, of times if he wants to run for president one day. The answer has not changed. 

“No,” Ryan said in an interview with Charlie Rose scheduled to air on PBS late Thursday. “It’s just not an ambition that I’ve long harbored, or I’ve harbored.” 

Ep. 35: Steps to Repealing Obamacare and the Republican Stragglers ​
The Week Ahead

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CQ Roll Call's resident budget guru Paul Krawzak spells out the steps Republicans will take to achieve a repeal of Obamacare. The fast-track approach, however, is facing resistance within the GOP, says Health reporter Erin Mershon.

Study: Obamacare Repeal Could Leave 30 Million Without Coverage
Urban Institute looked at using reconciliation to repeal health care law

A new study shows partially repealing the 2010 health care law through reconciliation would cause almost 30 million people to lose health insurance.

Ep. 31: Why Trump’s Drive to Replace Obamacare Faces a Bumpy Ride
The Big Story

With control of the White House and Congress, Republicans can easily repeal big parts of President Obama’s health care law, but finding alternatives could prove to be a political minefield, say CQ Roll Call health reporter Erin Mershon and Managing Editor Adriel Bettelheim.

Show Notes:

Ep. 27: Obamacare Premium Hikes a Headache for Policymakers
The Week Ahead
Health Care Premiums to Jump by 25 Percent in 2017
Administration says coverage on Healthcare.gov will remain affordable

Premiums will spike by an average of 25 percent next year for plans purchased on HealthCare.gov, according to a Monday report from the Obama administration.

Even with the dramatic increase for the so-called benchmark plans, more than two-thirds — 72 percent — of the Americans who get their health insurance through HealthCare.gov will be able to find plans for less than $75 per month, the report said. About 77 percent will be able to purchase plans under $100 per month.

State Health Exchanges Wrestle with Budgets
Early federal grant money from 2010 health care law has largely run out

An Obamacare sign is seen on the UniVista Insurance company office in Miami on December 15, 2015, the deadline to sign up for a plan under the 2010 health care law for full 2016 coverage. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images file photo)

State-based marketplaces survived startup problems with botched technology and political threats but continue to grapple with a fundamental challenge: financial sustainability.  

The 13 states that run their own exchanges face challenges in raising enough money, through user fees or state funding, to maintain their operations now that about $5 billion in early federal grants has largely run out. As states establish those budgets, they are testing decidedly disparate approaches to investments in priorities like marketing, technology and operations.  

Clinton Medicare Buy-In Plan May Appeal to Insurers, Employers
But odds against Medicare expansion have risen since 2010 health law

Hillary Clinton's Medicare buy-in proposal appears to be a response to her Democratic primary rival Sen. Bernie Sanders' call for a federally administered single-payer health program. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images file photo)

Employers and insurers might benefit if Democrat Hillary Clinton were to win the presidency and persuade Congress to expand Medicare, policy experts say. Clinton supports allowing people to buy into the federal health program for senior citizens and those with disabilities at age 55, a decade earlier than usual.  

The potential for corporate backing for a Medicare expansion likely would depend on how a future president and Congress shaped such a proposal. Clinton’s platform doesn’t spell out the details. America’s Health Insurance Plans, a trade group for the health insurance industry, declined to comment, saying officials are waiting for more information.  

Poll: Clinton's Health Policy Positions Align With More Voters
Voters say rival Trump is not spending enough time on health care

Presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, right, outpaces her Republican rival Donald Trump in voter support for their health care positions. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Hillary Clinton may have the edge over Donald Trump when it comes to health care issues, a new poll found.  

About 46 percent of voters said the presumptive Democratic nominee for president best represented their views on health care, according to a July poll from the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation. That compares to 32 percent who said the same for Trump, the presumptive Republican nominee. That could be because voters feel Trump isn't spending enough time on the issue: 56 percent said he didn't pay enough attention to health care, compared to 35 percent who said the same for Clinton.