health care

Democratic Lawmakers Feel Boost from Women’s March
Minority party hopes movement will help Congress rein in Trump

Protesters march down Independence Avenue in Washington, holding signs during the women’s march on Saturday, the day after the inauguration of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Capitol Dome was more than just a symbolic backdrop for Saturday’s Women’s March on Washington. It was the intended target of hundreds of thousands of voices of frustration with President Donald Trump. 

For all of the anti-Trump placards — both crude and shrewd — many marchers descended on the nation’s capital to send a message to the branch of government that, they hope, will be a check on the new president.

Message from Charlotte: Revolution Starts at Home
Local women’s march a reminder of how past divisions were resolved in ways no one could have imagined

Left to right: Tommy and Debbie George marched at the Women’s March in Charlotte, N.C., with their friend Mary Lou Buck. (Mary C. Curtis/CQ Roll Call)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — In this very blue city, in a state that went red for Donald Trump while sending a Democratic governor to the statehouse, a crowd estimated at more than 10,000 filled the streets at Saturday’s Women’s March. It was one of many across the country, sending a message that the story of Election 2016, far from being over, is just beginning.

The winding route took marchers — more than double in number than expected — past signposts of a region that has seen its share of divisions, but has made steady if shaky progress.

Attempts to Find Bipartisan Mood Challenged at Start
Despite hope among both parties, partisanship rears ugly head

President Donald J. Trump addresses the crowd after being sworn in as the 45th President of the United States on the West Front of the Capitol, January 20, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s inauguration ushered in hopes from both sides of the aisle for some bipartisan comity. But shortly after Trump departed the Capitol Friday, those feelings ran headfirst into the partisan scars of the previous Congress.

Some Democrats see the GOP reaping the rewards of what they call a strategy of obstruction in the last Congress, and it might be difficult for them to heed calls for bipartisanship, even if it’s something they might believe needs to happen. 

Ep. 37: NAFTA, Consumer Regulations on Trump's Undo List
The Week Ahead

By Shawn Zeller and Ellyn Ferguson

President Donald Trump is likely to use executive orders to repeal Obama administration regulations and address long-standing concerns about the North American Free Trade Agreement with Mexico and Canada, says CQ Roll Call's Trade reporter Ellyn Ferguson. Amit Narang, with the consumer advocacy group Public Citizen, talks about what his group and others will do to challenge Trump's orders, particularly ones involving financial regulations.

HHS Nominee Tom Price, Staff Aided Donors in Agency Battles
Democrats seek to undercut his nomination

Secretary of Health and Human Services nominee Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga., takes his seat before the start of his confirmation hearing in the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A Look Inside the Capitol: Lawmakers Prep for Inauguration Ceremony
Lawmakers were prepping for the rain and hoping for unity

California Rep. Doug LaMalfa arrives for President-elect Donald Trump's inauguration. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

As New York Republican Rep. Peter King gaveled in the House chamber at 10 a.m. for a quick pro forma session, there was an abnormal crowd of members in the chamber for what is typically a boring procedural necessity.

But on this Friday, a few hundred members gathered in the back of the chamber and lined up by class for their turn to exit the Capitol building and take their places on an erected platform to witness the inauguration of the 45th president of the United States.

Highlights of Donald Trump’s Inauguration
Bushes arrive for 45th president’s swearing in

President Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th president of the United States by Chief Justice John Roberts on the West Front of the Capitol on Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The inauguration of President Donald Trump was full of both Trump bombast and the ceremonial pomp and circumstance that comes with the swearing in of a new commander in chief.

On one end, many worked to uphold the democratic traditions while Trump sought to drive home the points of his inauguration.

New Yorkers Celebrated Inauguration With or Without Trump
New York State Society’s bipartisan event included a little Trump memorabilia

New Yorkers party at the New York State Society Inaugural Celebration on the eve of Donald Trump’s inauguration at the Fairmont Hotel in Washington on Thursday. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Donald Trump’s home state of New York held its state society inaugural party the night before his inauguration but the president-elect was barely a part of it. 

Despite rumors that Trump would make an appearance at the party, New York Republican Rep. Chris Collins said the incoming president was still at an event at Union Station, which the congressman had just left.

Ryan Still Doesn't Want to Run for President
Speaker says ‘the left’ is trying to delegitimize Trump’s presidency before it starts

Speaker Paul D. Ryan insists he still does not want to run for president. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan has been asked hundreds, if not thousands, of times if he wants to run for president one day. The answer has not changed. 

“No,” Ryan said in an interview with Charlie Rose scheduled to air on PBS late Thursday. “It’s just not an ambition that I’ve long harbored, or I’ve harbored.” 

Trump Administration’s First (Unofficial) Day in Washington
Spokesman clashes with Schumer; press credentials get you to nowhere

Several temporary toilets placed on Capitol grounds for the Inauguration have been labeled “Trump’s Tower” with a marker. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Inauguration Day is Friday but the Trump administration’s first official day in Washington was Thursday, as the incoming team clashed with Senate Democrats over its Cabinet nominations.

“There is no excuse,” White House Press Secretary-designee Sean Spicer said, for what he dubbed “delay tactics” by Senate Democrats on some of President-elect Donald Trump’s Cabinet selections. Spicer was in mid-administration form as he added that the Democrats’ tactics “call into question” whether they want a “government of continuity.”