health care

Peter King to Senate: Slow Your Roll on Health Care Bill
‘It’s wrong to pass something for the sake of passing it,’ GOP congressman says

Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., said it would be better to pass piecemeal legislation to “repeal what we can” of the 2010 health care law. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican Rep. Peter King criticized GOP senators’ proposed health care bill for cuts to Medicaid and said there was no rush to get legislation passed.

The New York congressman criticized the “severe cuts” to the health care program that aids low-income people and people with disabilities in an interview with CNN Wednesday night.

Heller is Guest at Trump Fundraiser
Trump trashes media, touts congressional race wins at $35,000 per person closed event

Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., was among the 300 or so people who attended President Donald Trump’s first re-election fundraiser Wednesday at Trump’s Washington hotel. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Dean Heller attended President Donald Trump’s fundraiser on Wednesday despite their disagreement about the Republicans’ health care bill.

Heller was spotted at Trump International Hotel where Trump held a $35,000 apiece fundraiser, according to two people in the room who talked to The Associated Press after the event.

Senate Health Care Discussions Continue as Agenda Stalls
Numerous revisions to the GOP health bill under consideration

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is seeing his legislative plate pile up, while health care discussions continue. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Republicans, in the aftermath of a major setback Tuesday, are weighing a swath of changes to legislation to overhaul the U.S. health insurance system, as the rest of their agenda piles up and deadlines near. 

The current plan, according to GOP lawmakers, aides and health care lobbyists, is for the conference to try to come to an agreement by Friday on a new draft of the bill to repeal and replace portions of the 2010 health care law. That would give the Congressional Budget Office time to analyze the revisions and let the GOP conference start preparing to vote on the measure when lawmakers return from the July Fourth recess.

Opinion: The Politics of Drug Policy
Lawmakers appear to be setting up a strategy of contradictions

While Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul thinks the Senate GOP health care bill is not conservative enough, he is also opposed to harsher drug sentencing, Curtis writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

It’s an intractable issue in the news daily, so the proposed, much-debated and now-delayed Senate Republican health care bill had to do something to answer the opioid addiction crisis in America. Add to that the basic political realization that in many of the states that supported Donald Trump and Republicans, a high percentage of people are hurting — to turn a blind eye would be a problem for America and for the GOP on many levels.

Many fear the Senate bill is not enough to meet a challenge that is intertwined with unemployment, the economy and more. Though, at least — and some would label it the very least — the uncertain yet compassionate reaction contrasts with the harsh strategy the Justice Department has laid out for other low-level drug offenders.

How Senators Spend Their Fourth of July
Sens. Schumer, Daines, Murkowski, and Scott on their favorite traditions

A Capitol Visitor Center tour guide points up in front of John Trumbull's “Declaration of Independence” painting in the Capitol Rotunda on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

HOH reached out to several senators to see how they celebrate Independence Day.

After the anticipated vote on the Senate Republicans’ health care bill was postponed, senators may be eager to have a celebratory weekend.

Protesters Urge Sen. Portman to Oppose Republican Health Care Bill
 

White House ‘Only’ Focused Health Care ‘Plan A’
Administration issues harsh warning to would-be undocumented immigrants

White House Principal Deputy Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders during a recent press briefing. On Wednesday, she said the president is solely focused on helping GOP lawmakers pass a health overhaul bill. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

White House officials say they are exclusively focused on helping Republican lawmakers craft and pass a health care overhaul, despite President Donald Trump’s repeated public statements about simply allowing the 2010 law to continue taking on water.

“We’re focused on Plan A,” which is Trump eventually signing a GOP-crafted overhaul bill, said White House Principal Deputy Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. “That’s the focus now, and that’s the only focus.”

Podcast: McConnell's Health Care Seesaw
The Big Story, Episode 59

From left, Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., after announcing there would be no vote on the health care bill this week. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate majority leader hasn’t abandoned hope of finding 50 votes for the year’s top GOP priority. But postponement over the July Fourth break won’t make it easier to bridge the gap between those focused on Obamacare’s repeal and those worried about too stingy a replacement, Roll Call's Niels Lesniewski and David Hawkings explain.

Show Notes:

Hatch Promises Open Process for Senate Tax Bill
Utah senator says all Finance panel Republicans will be involved

Senate Finance Chairman Chairman Orrin G. Hatch says his panel’s tax overhaul efforts will not be a “secretive exercise.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Trump Labels Notion He's Not Involved in Senate Health Debate a ‘Joke!’
‘I know subject well,' president tweets about health care after report that he doesn’t

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with Senate Republicans at the East Room of the White House on Tuesday to discuss the GOP health care bill. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

A day after a vote on a Senate health care bill he backed was delayed, President Donald Trump pushed back against reports that he has not taken a hands-on role in crafting the measure or garnering ample votes to pass it.

Trump used one of his typical morning tweets to lash out at a narrative that has emerged in recent days, including a New York Times piece posted online Tuesday evening, describing the president as not heavily involved in Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s efforts to piece together a package that would repeal and replace Barack Obama’s 2010 health law and then find the 50 votes to pass it (with Vice President Mike Pence casting the 51st and final necessary vote).