Library of Congress

Democrats Want to Seize Populism From Trump
Prepare their agenda with a new focus on antitrust policy

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi will be in Berryville, Va., for Monday afternoon’s rollout. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When congressional Democrats unveil their “better deal” agenda Monday afternoon, they will be trying to reclaim the populist mantle from President Donald Trump.

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer says the shift in messaging is about a commitment to reorienting the function of government.

How Bad Political Manners Fomented the Health Care Mess
Lawmakers feel free to misbehave when their leaders drop ‘regular order’

Republicans in Congress may be emulating President Donald Trump’s political manners. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A president whose brand is all about flouting basic political manners is getting matched in misbehavior more and more by fellow Republicans in Congress.

The first six months under President Donald Trump have been marked not only by a further coarsening of GOP rhetoric, stoked mainly by incessant infighting in backrooms, but also by increasing defiance of decades of behavioral norms — from Trump’s nominal friends and skeptics alike, when they’ve been trying to work with him and when they’ve been scrambling to maneuver despite him.

Analysis: Senators Writing Placeholder Defense Money Bill
Figure will be lower than House, in prelude to likely deal

Senate Appropriations Chairman Thad Cochran predicts Congress and the administration will eventually make a deal on raising the budget caps on defense accounts. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate appropriators’ forthcoming Pentagon spending bill for fiscal 2018, which will contain tens of billions of dollars less than the House’s measure, should be taken seriously, but not literally.

The Senate spending panel’s defense funding proposal is likely to grow, assuming — as is likely — that an agreement to slightly raise the budget caps is reached, as it has been for every year since the caps called for by the sequester were enacted in 2011.

Opinion: Can Democrats Deliver Like Papa John’s?
Better ingredients needed, at least something in the box

Democrats have reportedly come up with a slogan very similar to Papa John’s Pizza, Allen writes. But can they deliver and will there be anything in the box? (CQ Roll Call/Photos by Tom Williams and Bill Clark, Photo Composition by Chris Hale)

Democrats are so lost they don’t know how lost they are.

Instead of working feverishly on the substance of a contrast with the imploding Trump administration, they decided it was most important — a year and a half out from the next election — to publicly unveil a new slogan first.

Health Care, Tax Overhauls Drive Lobbying in Trump Era
“We’re feeling really confident going into the second half of the year”

During the turbulent first six months of the Trump administration, some of the biggest lobbying groups scaled back their spending as his signature initiatives collapsed. But major agenda items, including a tax overhaul, will continue to fuel K Street work.

Other wish-list items in the coming months will include a measure to raise the nation’s debt limit, funding the government for fiscal 2018, and continued negotiations about shoring up the nation’s health care system, even as Republican efforts to dismantle the 2010 health care law have cratered.

Democratic House Freshmen Show Fundraising Edge Over GOP Classmates
First-term Democrats outraise Republicans in first and second quarters

Florida Rep. Charlie Crist was the top House freshman fundraiser in the first half of 2017, according to FEC filings. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans may hold the House majority, but that doesn’t give them every advantage.

With their first two fundraising deadlines behind them, Democratic newbies in the chamber are demonstrating their ability to out fundraise their Republican colleagues.

Stupak Shares Insider Look at Obamacare Debate in New Book
In a timely release, Michigan Democrat recalls his amendment that saved bill

Former Michigan Rep. Bart Stupak has a new book on his experiences during the 2010 health care law debate. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Rep. Bart Stupak didn’t plan the release of his new book on his crucial vote for the 2010 health care law to coincide with the current debate over repealing it. 

“Timing was fortuitous,” the Michigan Democrat said. “I thought by now, the Republicans would have their bill done and there wouldn’t be a book.”

Another March on Washington?
March fatigue and mixed results from Trump protests has critics getting skeptical of results

Protesters march up 14th Street past the Washington Monument during the Women’s March on Washington on Saturday, jan. 21, 2017, the day after President Donald Trump’s inauguration. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

While activists planned Monday’s “Medicare for All” march on Washington to channel energy toward a policy goal, some are becoming skeptical of whether large marches in the capital accomplish much at all as they are becoming somewhat routine.

With the GOP’s effort to repeal the 2010 health care law stalled, many Democrats and those further to the left are rallying around single-payer health care as an alternative. But with Democratic leadership largely opposed to the idea, activists are looking for ways to show public support for it and pressure lawmakers.

Perdue’s Fellows Connect Congress to the Corps
Maj. Simba Chigwida is a national defense fellow this year

Georgia Sen. David Perdue poses with Maj. Jim Purekal, left, and Maj. Simba Chigwida in front of the Marine Corps War Memorial. (Courtesy Perdue’s office)

Georgia Sen. David Perdue’s office has had the unique opportunity of having two active-duty Marine Corps officers working there.

The Marine Corps affords some Marines the opportunity to apply for congressional fellowship positions and, if accepted, assigns them to a House or Senate office. Of the roughly 100 Marine fellows currently on the Hill, Perdue’s office has been assigned two back-to-back, which is pretty rare.

After Spicer Quits, Scaramucci Vows Aggressive Communications Shop
New communications director took job due to 'love' for president

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer resigned on Friday, refusing to work for new Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci. His replacement, however, said he “loves” Spicer. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Longtime Wall Street investment banker Anthony Scaramucci made his White House debut Friday, expressing his “love” for Donald Trump and promising a much more “aggressive” strategy of communicating the president’s message.

On a day of upheaval at the executive mansion, Sean Spicer resigned as press secretary and acting communications director amid reports he told Trump he believed Scaramucci’s hiring was a major mistake. What’s more, Scaramucci made his first major announcement as part of Trump’s team when he announced Spicer’s top deputy, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, will be the new press secretary.