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Korean-American Candidates Enter ‘Final Frontier’
Only one Korean-American has ever served in Congress

UC Irvine law professor Dave Min, left, is running to unseat Republican Rep. Mimi Walters in California’s 45th District, while Robert Lee Ahn is in a runoff for California’s open 34th District seat. (Photos courtesy Dave Min for Congress, Robert Lee Ahn for Congress)

Two candidates running for Congress in California are entering what one calls a “final frontier” for Korean-Americans. 

The only Korean-American elected to Congress was Jay Kim, a California Republican who served three terms from 1993 to 1999. 

Word on the Hill: Trump Is a Conversation Starter
Staffer events happening today

President Donald Trump’s first travel ban executive order is now the subject of a social media study. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When President Donald Trump first announced his temporary travel ban on immigrants from several Muslim-majority countries, one group started looking into how Americans were reacting to the news on social media.

Stratos Jets, a private jet charter service, has looked at more than 120,000 tweets related to the ban. It found that two days after the first executive order, more than 35 percent of those tweets contained the hashtag #NoBan.

Pelosi: Fire Sean Spicer Over Holocaust Statements
White House press secretary faces blow back for denying chemical weapons used in WWII

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer answers reporters’ questions during the daily news conference in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House April 11, 2017 in Washington, DC. Spicer said that different from Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad, Nazi leader Adolph Hitler did not use chemical weapons, saying, “I think when you come to sarin gas, he was not using the gas on his own people the same way that Assad is doing.” (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Updated at 7:13 p.m. | House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi is calling on President Donald Trump to fire his press secretary Sean Spicer for remarks he made Tuesday that suggested Adolf Hitler did not use chemical weapons during World War II.

Spicer was responding to a question during the daily White House briefing about Russia’s relationship to Bashar Assad’s Syrian regime and the support it has gotten from President Vladimir Putin.

In Abrupt Reversal, Trump Fires Cruise Missiles at Syria
President: Strikes in ’vital national security interest’

President Donald Trump arrives back at the White House on Feb. 6. On Thursday night, he ordered missile strikes on a Syrian air base in response to the regime’s use of chemical weapons on civilians (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

By JOHN T. BENNETT and BRIDGET BOWMANCQ Roll Call

In an abrupt policy reversal, President Donald Trump on Thursday evening ordered missile strikes on a Syrian air base after that country’s embattled regime carried out a deadly sarin gas attack that killed dozens of civilians.

Lawmakers Hope to Avert Government Shutdown
The deadline to fund the government is April 28

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said there is “no desire” for a continuing resolution. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

After weeks of partisan fighting over health care and the Supreme Court, lawmakers have less than one month to come together and avert a government shutdown.

Government funding for the 2017 fiscal year expires on April 28, five days after lawmakers return to the nation’s capital after a two-week recess. But negotiations appear to be moving forward.

Radel Dishes on His Career — and a Little About Cocaine
Former Florida congressman’s book released Tuesday

Trey Radel, then a Florida congressman, leaves court in November 2013 after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor charge of cocaine possession. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Florida Republican Rep. Trey Radel, who resigned after he was convicted of cocaine possession, comes clean about his short-lived career in Congress and shares a little about the drug that doomed him.

“While my deepest personal weaknesses cut short my dreams and work in Congress, I picked myself up. As individuals and a country, we can do the same,” he sums up in “Democrazy: A True Story of Weird Politics, Money, Madness & Finger Food.” The 300-page account of his life and times was released Tuesday.

Gorsuch Avoids Missteps at Supreme Court Hearing
“I have no difficulty ruling for or against any party”

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch testifies on the second day of his Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in Hart Building, March 21, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Supreme Court nominee Judge Neil Gorsuch spent 11 hours Tuesday abstaining from giving personal opinions on controversial issues and reassuring critics that he isn’t beholden to President Donald Trump, generally avoiding the kind of major slip that could trip up his confirmation.

Gorsuch adopted a solemn tone at times and tried to add dashes of levity at others, as he fielded gentle Republican questions and fended off Democratic queries on abortion rights, campaign finance and his previous decisions on administrative law and workers rights.

Trump Defense Boost Would Mean Big Gains for Some States
Democrats likely to hold line for parity with nondefense programs

Brian Schatz, whose state of Hawaii is the No. 3 recipient of per-capita defense spending, says there must be parity in domestic spending to go with any boost to national security programs. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A request from the Trump administration for a double-digit increase in defense spending could be largely decided by lawmakers whose states are far from equal players when it comes to the benefits of a bigger military budget.

That’s long been the case, as geographic, historic and strategic differences across the country result in more of an economic boost in certain states. But the differences are even more starkly displayed in a new Pew Charitable Trusts analysis that shows the funding split across all 50 states and the District of Columbia on a per-capita basis.

Federal Judges Block Trump’s Modified Travel Ban
President says ruling ‘makes us look weak’

Demonstrators hold signs at Dulles International Airport on Jan. 29 to protest President Donald Trump’s first executive order on immigration. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Federal judges in Hawaii and Maryland issued nationwide temporary restraining orders halting President Donald Trump’s revised travel ban, with one coming just hours before the executive action was set to go into effect.

A decision Wednesday by U.S. District Judge Derrick K. Watson in Hawaii was the second such ruling against Trump’s efforts to block temporarily certain immigrants, refugees and travelers from Muslim-majority nations from entering the country. A judge in Washington state blocked the original travel ban, which was broader in scope, shortly after it was signed Jan. 27.

More States Join Legal Challenge to Trump Travel Ban
Washington joined by Massachusetts, Minnesota New York and Oregon

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson on Thursday announced the state will fight President Donald Trump’s new executive order on immigration.  (Karen Ducey/Getty Images)

More states are joining the legal challenge to President Donald Trump’s new travel restrictions on immigrants from Muslim-majority countries.

Washington, which was the first state to sue over Trump’s original executive order, said it would renew its challenge and state Attorney General Bob Ferguson said New York asked to join its effort, The Associated Press reported.