Halloween

A spooky week on the Hill, Nats win the World Series: Congressional Hits and Misses
Week of Oct. 28, 2019

Fall leaves blanket the lawn on the east side of the Capitol on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

“The real horror story this Halloween is what’s preventing Congress from doing its job,” Sen. Charles E. Grassley said Wednesday. Maybe members can’t get their jobs done because they’re a bit distracted after the Washington Nationals won the World Series for the first time in franchise history.

Who let the dogs out? Tillis organizes Halloween dog parade

Sen. Thom Tillis pets a dog in a baby shark costume during his Bipawtisan Dog Costume Parade in the Hart Senate Office Building on Oct. 31, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The house may seem divided on official impeachment rules, but that didn't "paws" the Halloween festivities outside the Dirksen office of Sen. Thom Tillis.

The North Carolina Republican organized what he called the Bipawtisan Dog Costume Parade, traveling from the Dirksen Senate Office Building to the Hart atrium.

Capitol Ink | Trick or Trump

Giant candy bars and dinosaurs at White House Halloween party

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump hand out candy to trick-or-treaters Monday during a Halloween event at the White House. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump hosted families at the annual White House Halloween party on Monday night. The first couple passed out large, “commemorative” candy bars to trick-or-treating children of all ages. Most of the kids dressed up in their Halloween costumes a few days early for the event.

Migrants and lawmakers honored for Dia de los Muertos

Rep. Joaquin Castro discusses a Dia de los Muertos altar set up by the Congressional Hispanic Caucus on October 29, 2019 (Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call).

Members of Congress are commemorating Dia de los Muertos at the Capitol this year with altars honoring migrants and civil rights activists, as well as Rep. Elijah E. Cummings and former Rep. John Conyers Jr., who both died earlier this month. The Congressional Hispanic Caucus put together an altar to honor migrants who have died in U.S. custody.

How you (and your pet!) can be buried at the Congressional Cemetery
Dog-walking, movie nights and pet burials at the historic boneyard

A woman wanders the grounds of the Congressional Cemetery along with two canine companions. (Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call)

Despite its namesake, the Congressional Cemetery has about 5,000 plots available, and no, you don’t have to be a member of Congress to be buried in one. “The only requirement for being buried here is you have to be dead,” says Paul Williams, president of Historic Congressional Cemetery.

But the cemetery, situated in Southeast D.C., is not just a burial ground. It also serves as “a Central Park for this part of Capitol Hill,” according to Williams. It hosts parties, yoga, movie nights and has a dog-walking program. And you don’t have to be dead to partake in those.

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