government shutdown

Travelers From Six Muslim Countries Drop Without Travel Ban
U.S. also sees marked decline in admission of Syrian refugees

Demonstrators rally in Los Angeles on Feb. 4 in support of a judge’s restraining order against President Donald Trump’s first temporary travel ban. (David McNew/Getty Images file photo)

Even though President Donald Trump’s travel ban has run afoul of the courts, the number of visas issued to people from six majority-Muslim countries targeted by the executive order appears to be slowing down dramatically.

Separately, refugee resettlement in the U.S. from February through May has also plummeted, according to CQ Roll Call’s review of data released by the State Department.

GOP Group Ponders Debt Limit/Omnibus Combo
Republican Study Committee aims for votes before August recess

Rep. Mark Walker, R-N.C., chairman of the Republican Study Committee, says his group would like to combine a debt ceiling increase with an omnibus appropriations bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

With Congress needing to both prevent a government shutdown and a debt default in a matter of a few short months, the Republican Study Committee on Wednesday discussed the idea of combining a debt limit increase and an omnibus appropriations bill into one fiscal package to be voted on before Aug. 1.

“That’s what we’re shooting for,” RSC Chairman Mark Walker told Roll Call.

White House to Congress: Address Health Care, Debt Ceiling by August
Aide: Trump would take tax cuts only if more sweeping measure not possible

President Donald Trump has signaled he wants the health care and debt ceiling debates over before lawmakers' August recess. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

White House officials are pressing lawmakers to pass bills that would replace the 2010 health care law and raise the debt ceiling before they leave for their August break, clearing the fall months for tax overhaul and government spending fights.

President Donald Trump intends to discuss Republicans’ “path forward” on a health care overhaul and his proposed tax package during a Tuesday afternoon meeting at the executive mansion, said Marc Short, White House legislative affairs director.

Podcast: In Congress, GOP at a Legislative Standstill
The Big Story, Episode 56

Even with the first all-Republican government in a decade, Congress has yet to send any meaningful legislation to President Donald Trump, say CQ Roll Call congressional leadership reporters Niels Lesniewski and Lindsey McPherson. They explain why health care, taxes, the budget and confirmations will likely remain stuck at least through the summer.

The Fiscal 2018 Budget: It’ll Be a Slog
Budget Tracker Extra, Episode 16

 

With fiscal 2017 spending finally done, lawmakers are belatedly poised to begin working on fiscal 2018 funding, say CQ Roll Call's budget editor Jane Norman and Budget Tracker editor David Lerman. But the freshly passed House health care bill is likely to consume lawmakers’ time, further jamming up budget work, adds Lerman.

Health Care Will Determine Progress of Rest of Agenda
Spending debate, tax code rewrite all interrelated

Senate Finance Chairman Orrin G. Hatch, R-Utah, whose panel has jurisdiction over much of any health care package, says the chamber will take a more deliberative approach aiming at 51 votes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Last week’s legislative victories — finishing an omnibus spending bill and getting the rollback of the 2010 health care law through the House — are the foundation for the months of battles to come on Capitol Hill. 

Appropriators can begin to turn their attention toward the first full fiscal year of Donald Trump’s presidency, but their Senate colleagues will also have to deal with the procedural morass that comes with trying to reinvent the health care system through budget reconciliation.

Senate Clears $1 Trillion Omnibus for President’s Signature
Bill funds government through September

Sen. Roy Blunt, left, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, were among the Republicans speaking in support of the omnibus ahead of Thursday's vote. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Months later than many appropriators would have liked, the voting has wrapped up its work to fund the government through the end of September.

Senators voted 79-18 to send the $1.07 trillion omnibus bill, which featured the remaining 11 of the 12 regular spending measures as well as a variety of emergency spending measures, on to President Donald Trump.

The Art of the Spending Deal
The Big Story, Episode 52

Congress struck a deal on a long-overdue spending bill, and all hell broke loose. CQ Roll Call’s Jason Dick, Niels Lesniewski and Walter Shapiro discuss how Washington’s dynamics prevent even a small victory party from breaking out.

Republicans Facing Re-Election Adjust to an Unpredictable President
Incumbents focus on local successes while waiting for a major legislative win

New Jersey Republican Rep. Leonard Lance is charting his own course in the 7th District and isn’t supporting his party's health care plan. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

If there’s been one constant in President Donald Trump’s first 100 days, it’s unpredictability.

He keeps members of his party — even his own staffers — guessing about what he may say or do on any given policy issue. For Republicans running for Congress in 2018, that instability only underscores the importance of running localized races.

With End in Sight for Omnibus, Dissonance Takes Over
Sore feelings take hold even as deal heads to passage

Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker is among the Republicans who say he will not support the omnibus spending bill when the Senate considers it later this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

On a day Congress could have spent singing the praises of a bipartisan agreement to wrap up the long-overdue fiscal 2017 spending process, seemingly everyone — from Capitol Hill to the White House — found a way to hit dissonant notes. 

“They’re walking around acting like they pulled a fast one on the president, and I just won’t stand for it,” Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney said Tuesday afternoon at the third of three press briefings he conducted in a 24-hour period after congressional Democrats started effusively praising the omnibus spending deal as a win for their priorities.