GOP tax cuts

Capitol Ink | Tax Cuts R Us

Democrats want to eliminate corporate tax cut but their tax measure avoids it
Democrats have plans for spending money raising corporate rate would bring in, but they’ll go nowhere as long as Trump is in the Oval Office

House Ways and Means Chairman Richard Neal, D-Mass., has not included eliminating the corporate tax cut in current moving legislation. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

There’s no lack of plans from Democrats paid for by undoing at least part of the huge 2017 corporate tax rate cut. But the only Democrat with a tax bill currently moving through Congress is pointedly not talking about revisiting the lower 21 percent rate.

The 14 percentage point rate cut in the 2017 law, which is permanent, was projected to save corporations $1.35 trillion over its first 10 years. 

Watch: Menendez and Hugin Square Off After Bomb Threats
 

New Jersey Democratic Senator Bob Menendez and his opponent, Republican challenger Bob Hugin had their only debate Oct. 24. Although the two men agree on issues such as an immigration overhaul and protecting pre-existing conditions, there was no shortage of political and personal jabs.

Hugin challenged Menendez’s effectiveness in representing the Garden State, while Sen. Menendez accused Hugin of corporate greed for profit at the expense of cancer patients. Inside Elections with Nathan L. Gonzales currently rates the race Likely Democratic.

Capitol Ink | Red Wave

Trump’s Ending 2017 on Hot Streak With Congress
 

Capitol Ink | Tax Cut Christmas

Capitol-Ink-12-14-17

Capitol Ink | Workplace Training Exercise

Tax Cut Bills Face Increasing Partisanship: Recent Tax Votes in One Chart
Democrats more likely to oppose Republican presidents’ tax plans

House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady and House Majority Whip Steve Scalise embrace during a news conference in the Capitol after the House passed the the GOP’s tax overhaul bill Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House on Thursday passed a bill to answer President Donald Trump’s call for a big tax cut without the support of a single Democrat.

Tax cut votes have historically been bipartisan affairs, with both parties supporting cuts signed by presidents Eisenhower, Johnson, Nixon, Reagan, Clinton and Obama.