Frederica S Wilson

Opinion: Dems to African-American Women: This Time We Mean It
Party hopes to ‘rebuild relationships’ and ‘restore trust’ ahead of the midterms

When DNC Chairman Tom Perez showed up at the Essence Festival in New Orleans this month, it wasn’t for the Janet Jackson concert, Curtis writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

So why was Tom Perez, chair of the Democratic National Committee, making an appearance at this year’s Essence Festival in New Orleans, an event known for its high-powered mix of music, culture and empowerment, geared to engage black women globally? Did he see and enjoy “Girls Trip,” the 2017 mega-hit about the reunion of four black female buddies, set against the backdrop of the festival, and decide to get in on the fun, maybe take in a Janet Jackson concert?  

Or was he connecting with his party’s most loyal base, which has carried the electoral load for years, and has also expressed dissatisfaction when that contribution was downplayed or overlooked?

Schweikert Had More Threats Last Year Than Three Terms Combined
Says left is ‘going to get fringier and fringier, louder and louder, angrier and angrier’

Rep. David Schweikert, R-Ariz., said he has received more death threats last year than any previous year combined. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Arizona Rep. David Schweikert said he received more death threats in 2017 than in the rest of his time in Congress combined.

The fourth-term Republican made the comments on Wisconsin Republican Rep. Sean Duffy’s “Plaidcast” podcast, the Daily Caller reported.

When Donald Glover Met Roseanne …
Two TV shows, two moguls, and the shared anxieties of blue and red America

The spectacle of politics and how it fits, or doesn’t, into the nation’s culture. Subscribe to our newsletter here.

What do Donald Glover’s Atlanta and Roseanne Barr’s Lanford have in common? At first glance, not a whole lot. 

Kelly Again Alters White House Description of Porter Departure
Chief of staff says he resigned on Feb. 6, contradicting previous WH timeline

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly speaks during a White House briefing on Oct. 19. He offered his own description Friday of a former staffer's resignation during a domestic abuse scandal. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

John Kelly, President Donald Trump’s chief of staff, on Friday again shifted the White House version of events surrounding the resignation of a former senior staffer accused of domestic abuse by his ex-wives.

On Feb. 7, the White House announced then-Staff Secretary Rob Porter had resigned after the allegations, including an image of his first wife with a black eye she says he gave her in the early 2000s. That followed several statements in which Kelly defended Porter, with whom he had grown close since joining the White house in August.

Democrats Skipping State of the Union for Separate Women’s Event
Pair of Democrats attending ‘State of OUR Union’ with women’s rights activists instead

Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., is slated to speak at an event of women activists Tuesday night instead of attending President Donald Trump's State of the Union address. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

At least 11 Democratic lawmakers will skip President Donald Trump’s first State of the Union address Tuesday.

Instead, at least two of those absentees plan to take part in a separate event in Washington, the “State of OUR Union,” put on by leading women activists to “offer an alternative view and vision for the country” from Trump’s.

A Dozen Democrats Will Skip Trump’s State of the Union Address
Cohen says president is ‘unworthy of the podium, the position and the power’

Reps. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., left, and Danny Davis, D-Ill., right, will not attend President Donald Trump's State of the Union address. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated Jan. 30 2:10 p.m. | Tennessee Rep. Steve Cohen on Tuesday was the 12th Democratic member of Congress to announce that he would boycott President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address.

“I’ve spent 38 years in elected public office, helping make government work and speaking out against corruption because I believe, as President John F. Kennedy believed, that politics is an honorable profession,” Cohen said in a statement. “The current President is the antithesis of that sensibility: a man who appears determined to tear government down, harm the most vulnerable, benefit the rich and destroy foundational institutions such as the Department of Justice and the FBI.”

More Democrats Say They’ll Skip Trump’s State of the Union
Lawmakers cite president’s ‘racist’ comments, say they’ll have ‘state of our union’ event

Rep. Frederica S. Wilson, D-Fla., will not attend President Donald Trump's State of the Union address later this month, joining four other Democrats in protest. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Add two more Democrats to the list of House members catting on President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address later this month.

Reps. Frederica S. Wilson and Pramila Jayapal announced over the weekend they will join three other lawmakers boycotting the event held in the House chamber of the U.S. Capitol.

17 of 2017’s Most Popular Stories
A look back at a contentious year on the Hill

President Donald Trump arrives with Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., left, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., for the Republican Senate Policy luncheon in the Capitol to discuss the GOP tax reform bill in November. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

With control of the White House and both chambers of Congress, Republicans had high hopes of pushing an ambitious agenda forward and making good on last year’s campaign promises.

But their long-held promise of repealing and replacing the 2010 health care law stalled in the Senate in one of the most dramatic moments of the year. Infighting derailed other agenda items that followed.

After Controversies, Members Want Kelly to Avoid Spotlight
Sen. Graham: Having an opinion ‘doesn’t mean you have to share it’

White House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly speaks during a White House briefing last month. Lawmakers from both parties say he should focus on running a less chaotic White House. (Win McNamee/Getty Images file photo)

Lawmakers from both parties, concerned that John F. Kelly has too often added to the White House chaos he was hired to tamp down, want the chief of staff to revert to managing President Donald Trump’s administration far away from the television cameras.

The retired Marine Corps four-star general and former Homeland Security secretary views his new job as that of an ultimate insider, according to senior White House aides who report to him. But in recent weeks, Kelly has at times taken on a different role — combative spokesman for the president. And that has only created more heartburn for the White House and its Republican allies on Capitol Hill.

Word on the Hill: Dine With the Presidents
Cummings sends off grads, and honoring veterans

“Dads of Democracy.” (Courtesy District Winery)

This weekend, why not eat with all the presidents watching you? District Winery’s new restaurant, Ana, has unique artwork in its dining area featuring 44 presidents.

Ana is located in Navy Yard on Water Street SE.