Frank C Guinta

Rating Change: New Hampshire Open Seat Moves to Toss-Up
Shea-Porter was already considered vulnerable in 1st District

New Hampshire Rep. Carol Shea-Porter, right, will not seek a fifth term next year.(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Democratic Rep. Carol Shea-Porter’s retirement leaves an already competitive seat more vulnerable for her party as an open one, considering President Donald Trump carried New Hampshire’s 1st District 48 percent to 46 percent last fall.

“I felt the tug of family at our reunion on Independence Day, and I have continued to feel it,” Shea-Porter said in a statement Friday.

Shea-Porter Passes on Running for Another Term
New Hampshire Democrat says she ‘felt the tug of family’ in announcing decision

New Hampshire Rep. Carol Shea-Porter is not seeking a fifth term to the House. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Bipartisan Group Pushes Opioid Help Amid Obamacare Debate
Lawmakers concerned over potential effects of GOP health care overhaul

New Hampshire Rep. Ann McLane Kuster says the opioid epidemic has come as a surprise to many of her colleagues. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A bipartisan group of House lawmakers is fighting to keep attention focused on last session’s top health issue — abuse of prescription opioids, heroin and other drugs —  although the 2010 health care law now dominates the health policy discourse.

The group hopes to pressure Congress to provide financial support to states for prevention and treatment, even as Republicans pursue an overhaul of the Medicaid system that could make it harder for states to pay for those services.

K Street Eyes Outgoing Lawmakers for Jobs
Premium on figuring out Trump and who knows who

Nebraska Rep. Brad Ashford says he hadn’t determined whether K Street would be the right fit for him. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The more than 50 lawmakers who will be jobless in a few weeks may encounter an unpredictable market on K Street, should they consider taking a spin through the revolving door.

Business interests feel bullish on next year’s potentially frenzied legislative agenda, stocked with tax and health care overhauls and debate over new infrastructure projects. But most lobbying groups have a tenuous rapport with the incoming Trump administration and are evaluating their hiring through that lens.

Did Down-Ballot Democrats Rely Too Heavily on Trump?
Party only cut historic House deficit by 6 seats

Democrats were unsuccessful in their attempts to tie Minnesota Rep. Erik Paulsen to Donald Trump. The congressman ended up coasting to re-election by 14 points. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats never thought they were in for a great night on Tuesday, but their scant gains are inspiring new questions about how the party wins congressional elections after several cycles of disappointment.

Front and center, of course, is Donald Trump. How they missed the signs of Trump’s surprise victory will be a bigger question for the entire Democratic Party (and Republicans and the media alike) for months to come. 

Shea-Porter Returns to Congress, Defeats Guinta in New Hampshire’s 1st District
Shea-Porter and Guinta faced off for the fourth straight time

Carol Shea-Porter, right, will return to Congress for the third time after beating Frank C. Guinta in their fourth matchup. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrat Carol Shea-Porter will be returning to Congress, The Associated Press projects, after defeating Republican Rep. Frank C. Guinta in New Hampshire’s 1st District.

 

How Many House Seats Will Democrats Pick Up? Watch These Districts
Certain district types may provide early clues

Democrats need to knock off Republicans who sit in seats President Barack Obama won, like Maine Rep. Bruce Poliquin, R-Maine, center, and Frank Guinta, R-N.H., right. Defeating Rep. Scott Tipton, R-Colo., would suggest more of a wave. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Not all districts are created equal. They all count the same when adding for a majority, but victories in one type of district may portend a much better night for Democrats than in others. With just four days to go until Election Day, Democrats almost surely won’t gain the 30 seats needed for a House majority on Tuesday. But they will make some gains. Here’s where to watch for early clues as to just how big or small Democratic gains will be.

To achieve double-digit gains, Democrats must win the known battlegrounds. These are the districts that always were going to be competitive, and where presidential year turnout usually gives Democrats an advantage. At the very least, Democrats need to win the districts that President Barack Obama carried — places like Illinois’ 10th District, Nevada’s 4th and 3rd Districts, Maine’s 2nd District, Florida’s 26th District, (which is now even more Democratic), Iowa’s 1st District and New York’s 19th District. If they’re not able to win these seats, Democratic gains in the House will likely be very minimal.  

How the Hill's Endangered Have Been Voting
Some Republicans in Democratic turf have moderated, others have stayed hard right

Maine Rep. Bruce Poliquin, center, has a lower-than-average party unity score while New Hampshire Rep. Frank C. Guinta, right, who is even more vulnerable, scores close to the party average. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The year’s desultory legislative track record offers this insight into the closing days of the campaign for Congress: The already compacted political middle is threatened with additional shrinkage.

In the Senate, especially, but also in the House, the collection of lawmakers running scared less than a week before Election Day is overstocked with an endangered ideological species — the independent-minded centrist.

Who Trump Could Expect to Support His Term Limits Proposal
A few dozen members of Congress support legislation calling for term limits

Kentucky Rep. Andy Barr introduced legislation last year, calling for term limits on senators and House members. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s proposal to impose congressional term limits is unlikely to attract many allies in a Congress where he already has few. But there are still a few dozen Republicans he could likely count on to back the idea.

Congressional term limits can only be imposed through the adoption of a constitutional amendment. Nine Republican members of Congress have introduced several resolutions calling for such an amendment, collectively garnering a few dozen GOP co-sponsors.

Most Trump Defectors Aren't Running for 2016 Cover
Majority of his swollen roster of congressional GOP opponents have safe seats

The list of Republicans in Congress who oppose GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump is mostly populated with lawmakers who are safe bets for re-election in November. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As he continues fomenting the Great Republican Civil War of 2016, one of Donald Trump’s myriad outraged narratives is this: Everyone in the growing posse of his congressional opponents has turned tail for shortsighted and selfish reasons.

Like so many other times during the Trump campaign, what he’s emphatically asserting is not supported by the facts.