food

Radel Dishes on His Career — and a Little About Cocaine
Former Florida congressman’s book released Tuesday

Trey Radel, then a Florida congressman, leaves court in November 2013 after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor charge of cocaine possession. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Florida Republican Rep. Trey Radel, who resigned after he was convicted of cocaine possession, comes clean about his short-lived career in Congress and shares a little about the drug that doomed him.

“While my deepest personal weaknesses cut short my dreams and work in Congress, I picked myself up. As individuals and a country, we can do the same,” he sums up in “Democrazy: A True Story of Weird Politics, Money, Madness & Finger Food.” The 300-page account of his life and times was released Tuesday.

Opinion: Art as Soul Food – A Tough Yet Essential Case to Make
President Trump’s proposed budget cuts are ill-advised

Funding for humanities programs, such as the National Endowment for the Arts, is only a fraction of the federal budget and should not be cut, Curtis writes. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images file photo)

Most critics expressing outrage at President Donald Trump’s proposed budget have focused on cuts to the Community Development Block Grant program that funnels money to Meals on Wheels. And who can blame them? 

If you’re looking for allies for your cause, that’s the narrative you want — one that sets up clear-cut heroes and villains, especially with budget director Mick Mulvaney, sent from central casting and all but twirling a mustache as he says, “We can’t spend money on programs just because they sound good,” or “There’s no demonstrable evidence” that after-school programs that also feed children are actually “helping kids do better at school.”

Word on the Hill: Cherry Blossoms
Your social calendar for the week

The Cherry Blossoms were in full bloom last year. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The cherry blossoms that survived the cold weather last week were supposed to reach their peak yesterday.

Have you seen the trees in bloom yet?

What It Costs to Educate New Members of Congress
Recent House disbursement report includes total for fall orientation, though number could grow

Newly elected Minnesota Rep. Jason Lewis arrives at the Capitol Hill Hotel in November 2016 — the day freshman members checked in for orientation. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As empty nesters know, getting a freshman prepared for college can be expensive.

The same goes for a freshman in Congress.

Word on the Hill: St. Patrick’s Day
Cherry Blossoms?

It's been a busy week. Blow off some steam by celebrating the holiday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

The Dubliner and Irish Times are two restaurants right in front of Union Station that are perfect places to celebrate the holiday.

Members See Green
How they’re celebrating St. Patrick’s Day

New York Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney at a previous St. Patrick’s Day celebration. (Photo courtesy of Maloney’s office)

It’s St. Patrick’s Day and plenty of members of Congress are celebrating their heritage.

On Thursday, many showed up at the office by wearing Irish flag ties, green blazers, dresses, and accessories.

Word on the Hill: D.C. and Guns
Save the date for Dine Out Day

Cherry blossoms were covered with ice on the East Front of the Capitol after snow and freezing rain fell over the region on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

With gun sales on the decline in the U.S. since President Donald Trump took office, WalletHub conducted a study to find out which states were the most dependent on the gun industry.

The District of Columbia topped the list for highest average wages and benefits in the firearms industry at $348,325. That’s more than 10 times higher than New Mexico, which came in last at $34,232.

Reps. Hurd and O’Rourke Make Bipartisan Buddy Movie
“The longest cross-country livestream town hall in the history of the world’

Democratic Rep. Beto O’Rourke, left, and Republican Rep. Will Hurd left San Antonio at 7 a.m. CDT Tuesday. (Courtesy Rep. Beto O’Rourke’s Facebook page)

With a major winter storm on the East Coast canceling flights across the country, two congressmen decided to have a bipartisan adventure on their way back to Washington.

Democrat Beto O’Rourke and Republican Will Hurd rented a car and left San Antonio at 7 a.m. CDT on the road to D.C.

Former Rep. Eligio ‘Kika’ de la Garza Dies at 89
Texas Democrat served 16 terms in the House

Rep. Eligio “Kika” de la Garza, D-Texas, second from right, claps as Rep. Tom DeLay, R-Texas, throws a football in a House conference room in this undated photo. De la Garza passed away Monday. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

In 1978, Texas Democratic Rep. Eligio “Kika” de la Garza was invited to accompany his colleague Rep. Leo J. Ryan to Guyana on a fact-finding mission and escort people being held at the People’s Temple colony to safety.

De la Garza, like several colleagues in the House, turned down the invitation due to the House’s “hectic” schedule. Ryan and four other members of his delegation were murdered as they were getting on a plane to leave the country before more than 900 people committed mass suicide in the jungle.

GOP OK With Trump Rally Delaying Labor Nominee
Tennessee event conflicted with confirmation hearing

Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., talks with reporters before a GOP caucus luncheon. On Wednesday, he will join President Trump at a rally in Nashville. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Despite hammering Democrats for slowing Donald Trump’s Cabinet nominations, Senate Republicans don’t mind delaying a confirmation hearing this week so the president can rally the base on Wednesday and sell a Republican-crafted health care bill. 

But GOP sources were quick Monday to defend the delay of a Cabinet-level nominee’s hearing, saying replacing the 2010 health care law is equally important. The situation is the latest example of the bumpy ride many of the 45th president’s top nominees have had.