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U.S. Eyes Chinese Navy Growth

The Wall Street Journal reports that "China’s navy chief, Adm. Wu Shengli, strolled the Harvard University campus in a tweed blazer and slacks during a visit to the U.S. last fall, joking with students and quizzing school officials about enrolling some of his officers."  

The piece continues: "Shortly after his U.S. visit, Adm. Wu took another trip—this time to the Spratly Islands, an archipelago in the South China Sea where his country appears to be building a network of artificial island fortresses in contested waters. It was his first known visit to facilities U.S. officials fear could be used to enforce Chinese control of nearly all the South China Sea, one of the world’s busiest shipping routes."  

Enola Gay Pilot's Grandson to Lead B-2 Unit

USA Today reports that "the grandson of the pilot who flew the Enola Gay will command the Air Force's stealth nuclear bomber unit."  

"Brig. Gen. Paul W. Tibbets IV will command the 509thBomb Wing at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri, Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Welsh announced Friday. Tibbets is currently the deputy director of nuclear operations for U.S. Strategic Command at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska."  

U.S. Drillers Working to Push Back OPEC Threat

The Associated Press reports that "OPEC and lower global oil prices delivered a one-two punch to the drillers in North Dakota and Texas who brought the U.S. one of the biggest booms in the history of the global oil industry."  

"Now they are fighting back."  

Obama 'Determined' to End Afghan War, Though Timetable May Shift

The Washington Post reports that "top U.S. officials have shown a willingness to adjust President Obama’s plan for winding down the war in Afghanistan, allowing military commanders to delay troop departures and expanding combat authorities for forces remaining on the ground."  

"But there’s one thing they’ve made clear is not up for discussion: Obama will end the U.S. military mission entirely by the time he leaves office in January 2017."  

NATO Military Head Outlines Ukraine Risks

The Wall Street Journal reports that "the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s top military commander on Sunday said not delivering weapons to Ukraine carries risks, and he registered continued concerns about the implementation of the war-torn country’s cease-fire agreement signed in February."  

"U.S. Air Force General Philip Breedlove reiterated the need to counter Russian diplomatic, economic and military tools being used to back separatists in eastern Ukraine."  

U.S. Military Starts Eastern European 'Road March'

Army Times reports that "columns of Stryker vehicles will road march across Eastern Europe in an unprecedented exercise designed to assure America's allies."  

"Operation Dragoon Ride is scheduled to begin March 21, and it comes one year after Russia annexed Crimea in an action condemned by Kiev and the West as an illegal land grab, but heralded by many Russians as correcting a historic injustice."  

Challenges for Pentagon Rocket Plan

The Wall Street Journal reports that "the U.S. wants to inject more competition into the space race, but Pentagon leaders are worried they won’t be able to muster contenders to the starting line."  

"The Pentagon’s challenge centers on ensuring it has enough rocket launchers to send new satellites into space at the end of this decade. Congress has told the department to stop using, as of 2019, the Russian-made engine that it has relied on for nearly two decades to power the Atlas V rockets, which carry many U.S. military satellites. The Pentagon’s current—and sole—launch provider, United Launch Alliance LLC, plans to retire the only other launch vehicle the Pentagon uses to blast payloads into high orbits, the Delta IV rocket, by 2018 to save money."  

Energy Moves Businesses Employ to Drive Sustainability

The Business Roundtable provides an interesting infographic that shows various energy-related tactics businesses employ to improve sustainability.  

Has France Leaped Britain as Top U.S. Military Partner?

Agence France-Presse reports: Once a source of irritation for the United States, France has nudged aside Britain to become the US military's key European partner."  

"The growing ties between the two militaries were on display this month when France's top military officer, General Pierre de Villiers, hosted his US counterpart, General Martin Dempsey, aboard France's aircraft carrier, the Charles de Gaulle."  

U.S. Cyber Command Command Says Country May Need to Increase Offensive Cyber Capabilities

The Washington Post reports that "the government’s efforts to deter computer attacks against the United States are not working and it is time to consider boosting the military’s cyber-offensive capability, the head of U.S. Cyber Command told Congress on Thursday."  

“'We’re at a tipping point,' said Adm. Michael S. Rogers, who also directs the National Security Agency, at a hearing of the Senate Armed Services Committee. 'We need to think about: How do we increase our capacity on the offensive side to get to that point of deterrence?'”