family separation

Homestead: On the front lines of the migrant children debate

Protesters hold cardboard hearts up in front of the Homestead migrant children detention facility. They hope the children across the fence can see them. (Jinitzail Hernández/CQ Roll Call)

The immigration debate in southern Florida is not like those of any of the other detention centers around the U.S. Homestead sits on 55-acres of land sandwiched between buildings abandoned due to hurricane damage and the Homestead Air Reserve Base. The ground is a mix of gravel and grass and locals say heavy rains hit every afternoon.

Immigrant raids could lead to more family separations
CQ on Congress, Episode 161

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., is one of the lawmakers voicing concerns about the conditions in migrant detention centers. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Trump administration says it will round up undocumented immigrants who have missed a court date in an effort to deter others migrants from seeking refuge in the United States. But raids could exacerbate family separations, report CQ Roll Call’s Tanvi Misra and Jinitzail Hernandez, who just returned from visiting one of the largest migrant detention centers in Homestead, Fla., where the government is holding 2,000 teenage immigrants.

Hirono gives emotional plea for migrant children and families

Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, attends a news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center on Democrats' year end priorities including "reauthorizing the Children's Health Insurance Program, funding community health centers, and passing the Dream Act," on December 14, 2017. Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

Challenges for Trump’s Democratic overseers
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 142

Michael Cohen, former attorney for President Donald Trump, testifies during the House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democrats have ramped up oversight of President Donald Trump and his administration with hearings this week on Trump’s finances, the Russia inquiry, the immigrant child separation policy and more.

But holding hearings and asking questions is only the first step in successful oversight, says Justin Rood, director of the Congressional Oversight Initiative at the Project on Government Oversight and a former staff investigator for Oklahoma GOP Sen. Tom Coburn. Congressional overseers must then grapple with their targets to make sure they cooperate, or cultivate whistleblowers who will provide information outside the standard channels.

Jeff Merkley requests FBI perjury investigation into Kirstjen Nielsen
At issue is testimony before Congress about family separations at border

Sen. Jeff Merkley is requesting that the FBI open a perjury investigation into Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Jeff Merkley is requesting that the FBI open a perjury investigation into Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, based on testimony she gave to Congress in December on family separations at the southern border.

Testifying before the House Judiciary Committee in December, Nielsen stated “I’m not a liar, we’ve never had a policy for family separation.”

Latino Voters Angry at Trump But Not Mobilized, Democratic Report Finds
Blue candidates need clear message to court Latino votes in midterms, according to study

Latino voters’ anger at Trump administration policies could be an opening for Democrats in 2018 a new report finds. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats have a chance to win big in this year’s midterms by channeling Latino voters’ anger at President Donald Trump’s immigration and health care agenda, according to the findings of a Democratic-funded study released Tuesday.

But first, they’ll have to convince Latinos their vote will mean something.

5 Big Things the House Is Not Doing Before August Recess
Appropriations, immigration matters and Russia response among the unaddressed issues

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., conducts a news conference with House Republican leaders on July 17. Also appearing are, from left, conference chair Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, and House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As the Senate prepares to work into August, the House is set to adjourn Thursday for its annual late summer recess with some unfinished business. 

Some legislative items the House is leaving on the table are must-pass bills with looming deadlines, and others are issues members want to tackle. Here are five things the chamber will not have done before they head home for August recess:

House To Vote Wednesday on Resolution to Support ICE
Plan to vote on bill to terminate ICE dropped after Democrats said they’d oppose it

The House will vote Wednesday on a resolution by Rep. Clay Higgins, R-La., expressing the chamber’s support for ICE officials and rejection of calls to abolish the agency. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans have abandoned a plan to vote on a Democrat-sponsored bill to terminate the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency after the bill’s authors said they and their colleagues would vote against it.

But GOP leaders are still planning to hold a vote on a resolution by Louisiana GOP Rep. Clay Higgins expressing the House’s support for all ICE officers and personnel and denouncing calls to completely abolish the agency.

Republicans Put Immigration Divisions on Hold for ICE Messaging Votes
GOP members still want to vote on family reunification, agriculture guest worker program

Immigration has bedeviled Speaker Paul D. Ryan and House Republicans, but they will push messaging votes on it either this week or next. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Lacking a unified strategy on most immigration policy, Republicans are looking to temporarily set aside their differences and highlight an issue that has divided Democrats. 

GOP leaders are planning two votes this week or next related to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, which some Democrats say they want to abolish.

Paul Ryan, Nancy Pelosi Let Fly the Shark Jumping, Russia Zingers
Normally staid Thursday pressers get lively

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, pictured here, and Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi let loose the zingers at their Thursday news conferences. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Thursday’s weekly House leadership press conferences were full of lively remarks, with Speaker Paul D. Ryan saying Democrats on the left “jumped the sharks” in their push to abolish ICE and Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi suggesting Russia has leverage over President Donald Trump.

The Wisconsin Republican and California Democrat hold weekly press conferences every Thursday with reporters in the Capitol to discuss news of the week. Their answers are mostly predictable and often mundane but occasionally they bring some zeal.