Evan H Jenkins

Meet Carol Miller. She Could Be the Only New Republican Woman Coming to Congress Next Year.
The GOP’s only new woman, so far, will represent West Virginia’s 3rd District

West Virginia Republican Carol Miller may be the only new GOP woman in the next Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Among the 33 new women elected to the House this week, only one is a Republican. 

Carol Miller, the majority whip in the West Virginia state House and daughter of a former Ohio congressman, won the Mountain State’s 3rd District seat Tuesday night, defeating Democratic state Sen. Richard Ojeda.

West Virginia’s Joe Manchin Stays Put in Trump Country
Embattled Democrat played up his willingness to work with the president and buck his own party

Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., holds Ava Lott, the 2018 Ripley 4th of July Wee Miss, before a parade.  (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin has won re-election in West Virginia in the heart of Trump country, dispatching Republican state Attorney General Patrick Morissey.

With 69 percent of precincts reporting, Manchin led Morrisey 50 percent to 46 percent when The Associated Press called the race.

5 Things That Defined the Fight for the Senate
Democrats still largely on defense, but battlefield shifted some this cycle

Former state Rep. Mike Braun defeated two congressmen in the Indiana Senate Republican primary. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The battle over Supreme Court Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh’s confirmation threw a wildcard into the race for Senate control. But the contours of the fight for the chamber aren’t much different from a year ago: Democrats running for re-election in states President Donald Trump carried by wide margins in 2016 are in trouble heading into Election Day.

Democrats are defending 26 seats — 10 of them in states that backed Trump — while Republicans are only defending nine. Given that imbalance, it’s no surprise that Trump’s effect on Senate races has been different from his influence on the fight for control of the House, where he’s put GOP incumbents on defense.

Evan Jenkins to Resign Seat on Sunday, Head to West Virginia Supreme Court
West Virginia Republican lost Senate bid, accepted state high court nomination

Rep. Evan Jenkins, R-W.Va., who lost a bid for the Republican nomination for Senate in West Virginia, is leaving his House seat as of Sunday to take a seat on the state's Supreme Court. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Stivers Thinks House GOP Can Grow Number of Women but That’s Unlikely
Six GOP women aren’t running for re-election to the House

Republican Diane Harkey is running in California’s 49th District to succeed GOP Rep. Darrell Issa. (Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call file photo).

Despite a quarter of the women in the House Republican Conference not running for re-election, the head of the House GOP’s campaign arm said he is “very confident” the party can increase its female members in the chamber next year. 

But looking at the number of female GOP lawmakers leaving the House and how few Republican women won nominations in open seats this year, just breaking even might be hard for House Republicans. 

Evan Jenkins’ Seat in West Virginia to Remain Vacant Until January
Defeated GOP Senate primary candidate was appointed to state Supreme Court

Rep. Evan Jenkins, R-W.Va., was appointed as an interim justice to the West Virginia Supreme Court. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When Rep. Evan Jenkins, who lost a bid for the Republican Senate nomination in West Virginia earlier this year, resigns from Congress in the coming days, his seat will remain vacant until January, West Virginia’s elections director told The Charleston Gazette-Mail.

Jenkins was appointed by Gov. Jim Justice to fill a vacancy on the West Virginia Supreme Court last week after the state’s House of Delegates voted to impeach Justice Robin Davis, who resigned after the vote.

Republican Lawmaker Likely Leaving Congress Sooner for Court Job
Evan Jenkins joining West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals

Rep. Evan Jenkins has been appointed to one of two open seats on the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice on Saturday appointed Rep. Evan Jenkins to a vacant seat on the state Supreme Court of Appeals. 

Jenkins, who lost a primary for the GOP Senate nomination in May, has filed to run for the special election to fill the remainder of the term on the court, which is set for Nov. 6. 

Some House Members Flop In Bids for Governor
Colleen Hanabusa is the latest one to fall

Rep. Colleen Hanabusa, D-Hawaii, lost her primary run for governor. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Hawaii Rep. Colleen Hanabusa’s loss in the state’s Democratic gubernatorial primary is the latest example of House members losing their bids for the highest office in a state. 

Hanabusa lost the primary Saturday to incumbent Gov. David Ige. Hanabusa returned to the House in 2016 after the death of former Rep. Mark Takai.

Ed Case’s Comeback Bid Continues in Hawaii Race for Hanabusa’s Seat
Former congressman wins crowded Democratic primary in 1st District

Hawaii Rep. Colleen Hanabusa lost her bid for governor Saturday night. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 7:52 a.m. | Former Rep. Ed Case won the Democratic nomination in Hawaii’s open 1st District on Saturday night, and is likely returning to Congress next year to represent the deep-blue seat. Case previously served two terms in the House from the 2nd District.

With 100 percent of precincts reporting, Case led a seven-way primary field with 40 percent of the vote, The Associated Press reported. Lt. Gov. Doug Chin and state Sen. Donna Mercado Kim trailed behind with 26 percent and 18 percent respectively.

$177.1 Billion Labor-HHS-Education Moves Forward With Family Separation Changes
House Appropriations has approved 11 of 12 fiscal 2019 spending measures

Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., wants the Labor-HHS-Education bill linked to the Defense bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Appropriations Committee late Wednesday evening approved, 30-22, a $177.1 billion fiscal 2019 bill to fund the departments of Labor, Education, and Health and Human Services.

The committee has now approved 11 of its 12 fiscal 2019 spending measures, following the marathon 13-hour markup of the massive nondefense bill that left lawmakers from both parties exasperated at various points. The debate covered family separations at the U.S.-Mexico border, gun research funding, abstinence-only sex education and thorny political issues around religious adoption agencies.