Eric Swalwell

Congress Braces for Tense Debate on Surveillance Law
Spy agencies argue for permanent reauthorization of FISA amendments

Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., is sponsoring legislation to reauthorize the 2012 FISA amendments with no sunsets. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawmakers are facing a potentially bruising fight over a surveillance law that expires Dec. 31 and must be extended in time to preserve what U.S. spy agencies consider a vital piece of their arsenal.

Congress has to extend the 2012 FISA Amendments Act, which will pit the Trump administration and national security hawks in Congress who favor a permanent reauthorization with no changes, against lawmakers of both parties, libertarians, privacy advocates and communications companies seeking to tighten protections for U.S. persons whose communications may get caught up in the wide electronic net cast by spy agencies.

Word on the Hill: Bike Your District
Hiking town hall and BaconFest

West Virginia Rep. Alex X. Mooney tweeted a photo from his bike ride across his district. (Courtesy Mooney’s Twitter page)

Lawmakers often find interesting ways to travel across their states or districts each recess.

Last August, Sen. Christopher S. Murphy, D-Conn., walked across the Nutmeg State, and Sen. Gary Peters, D-Mich., did a motorcycle tour across the Wolverine State.

Swalwell’s Weekend: Baggage Handler and Barista
California Democrat’s continues ‘In Your Shoes’ initiative

(Rep. Eric Swalwell’s office via Twitter)

One member of Congress spent his Saturday slinging bags and pouring coffee.

As part of Rep. Eric Swalwell's, D-Calif., #InYourShoes initiative, he worked as a Southwest Airlines baggage handler at Oakland International Airport and a Starbucks barista in Dublin, Calif.

Defending Against a Cyberattack on Democracy
Campaigns and operatives taking prevention into their own hands

A woman with her daughter casts her vote in North Las Vegas, Nevada, on Election Day last fall. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Congressional campaigns rocked by Russian interference in the 2016 elections are trying to make sure that it never happens again.

Campaigns and elections are top targets for future cyberattacks. So campaign committees and campaigns themselves are taking steps to bolster security staff and training.

By the Numbers: Richmond, DeSantis, Others Pad Their Baseball Resumes
Both sides had standout performers at the Congressional Baseball Game

Louisiana Democratic Rep. Cedric L. Richmond pitches during the 56th annual Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park in Washington on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When the usually lighthearted run-up to the annual Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game was marred by a horrific shooting at the Republican practice session last week, Capitol Hill came together for an emotional night of bipartisanship and baseball. But one thing it did not do was make the players go easy on one another.

“I did tell [Republican manager Texas Rep. Joe L. Barton] that I love him before the game, and I love him after the game, but during the game, we’re going to play to win,” Pennsylvania Rep. Mike Doyle, the Democratic manager, quipped at a pre-game press conference. With the coveted Roll Call Trophy on the line, that was exactly what they did, defeating the Republican squad, 11-2. Despite the lopsided score, though, there were standout individual performances on both sides.

By the Numbers: How the Teams Stack Up
A look at the stats to determine which team has the statistical edge in this year’s matchup

Democratic Rep. Cedric L. Richmond of Louisiana is statistically one of the best players in the history of the Congressional Baseball Game. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

This story was originally published in the official game program of the 56th annual Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game, which was distributed on June 15.

So you think you’re a numbers whiz regarding all things Congress. You know how much money is in the latest appropriations bill. You know by how much Sen. Rand Paul won his last election. But do you know lawmakers’ vital statistics where it counts — on the baseball diamond?

Word on the Hill: Calm Before the Recess
Your social calendar for the week

OMB Director Mick Mulvaney, center, GPO Director Davita Vance-Cooks, left, and other officials review production of the fiscal 2018 budget at the Government Publishing Office's plant on North Capitol Street on Friday. The budget will be released this week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

It’s the last week before the Memorial Day recess.

There are a few things going on to get you through until the long weekend and four-day break.

Photos of the Week: Lawmakers Reel and Run
The Week of May 15 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Arizona Sen. John McCain talks with reporters on Wednesday after a vote in the Capitol about whether a special prosecutor is needed to investigate President Donald Trump’s alleged ties to Russia. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

BY BILL CLARK AND TOM WILLIAMS

The House returned Tuesday after a one-week recess to a Washington reeling from new allegations related to the firing of FBI Director James B. Comey and revelations that the president shared classified information with Russian officials in the Oval Office. 

Swalwell Welcomes First Child
California Democrat announces baby on Twitter

Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., reported his first child and his wife Brittany were both healthy after son Nelson’s birth Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Eric Swalwell and wife, Brittany, had their first child on Thursday night.

Swalwell, 36, announced on Twitter that his son, Nelson, was born in California.

Trump Appears to Confirm Report He Gave Russians Classified Info
After partial denials from aides, president claims ‘absolute right’ to share data

President Donald Trump concludes his remarks at the 36th annual National Peace Officers' Memorial Service at the Capitol on Monday. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump appeared to confirm a report that he discussed highly classified information with senior Russian officials last week, contradicting some of his top aides while claiming an “absolute right” to do so.

Around 7 p.m. Monday, the president dispatched National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster to partially deny a Washington Post report that he revealed highly classified information about Islamic State plot involving laptop computers and passenger airliners gleaned by a U.S. ally to senior Russian officials. McMaster told reporters the article “as it came out tonight, is false.” He said no intelligence sources or methods were disclosed — something not alleged in the Post article.