Elijah E Cummings

Barr says he has no problem with Mueller testifying before Congress
Pelosi and Schumer call for special counsel to appear before House and Senate

Attorney General William Barr testifies before a House Appropriations subcommittee on the Justice Department’s fiscal 2020 budget request on April 9. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Attorney General William Barr said Thursday he had no problem with special counsel Robert S. Mueller III testifying before Congress about his investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election or possible collusion with the Trump campaign.

“I have no objection to Bob Mueller personally testifying,” the attorney said at a news conference before the release of Mueller’s 400-page report.

Why Democrats aren’t rushing to change immigration laws
They don’t agree with Trump and public sentiment doesn’t provide a mandate toward a solution

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., flanked from left by Assistant Democratic Leader Ben Ray Lujan, D-N.M., House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., Democratic Caucus Chair Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., House Majority Whip James E. Clyburn, D-S.C., Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Chair Cheri Bustos, D- Ill., and Democratic Caucus Vice Chair Katherine Clark, D-Mass., speaks to the press during the House Democrats' 2019 Issues Conference at the Landsdowne Resort and Spa in Leesburg, Va. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats are treading carefully on immigration as they attempt to show they can lead on the divisive issue heading into the 2020 elections.

President Donald Trump, who won election in 2016 on a campaign to crack down on immigration and what he often refers to as “open borders,” is planning to repeat the strategy heading into 2020. In recent weeks, he’s launched near daily attacks on Democrats for their refusal to change immigration laws — an accusation that, as with many things Trump says, is not entirely true.

Bernhardt’s office acknowledges meetings left off schedule
Interior also confirms secretary’s staff regularly overwrites his personal itinerary

House Democrats have said Interior Secretary David Bernhardt could be running afoul of federal records laws. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Interior Department has acknowledged that Secretary David Bernhardt’s staff intentionally left controversial meetings with representatives of fossil fuel, timber and water interests off his public calendar, citing “internal protocol” governing his schedules.

The department also confirmed that Bernhardt used a personal itinerary kept on a single Google document that was regularly overwritten by his scheduling staff and said he is still doing so as House Democrats probe whether the practice adheres to federal records laws.

Stephen Miller must testify about placing immigrants in ‘sanctuary cities,’ Nadler says
Trump immigration adviser is at center of controversial proposal to release ‘thousands’ of undocumented immigrants into ‘sanctuary cities’

Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., is seen before a House Judiciary Committee hearing titled “Protecting Dreamers and TPS Recipients,” in Rayburn Building on Wednesday, March 6, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Three top House Democrats are demanding answers from the Trump administration on a White House proposal to release undocumented immigrants in so-called sanctuary cities to retaliate against President Donald Trump's political rivals.

The chairmen of the House Committees on Oversight and Reform, the Judiciary, and Homeland Security set a May 3 deadline for Trump's White House and DHS to deliver documents and communications about the proposal, which was reportedly devised and pushed by Trump immigration adviser Stephen Miller.

Dems unlikely to help Cohen get reduced sentence for more information
Senior Oversight Democrat says panel is willing to see more material from ex-Trump lawyer, but ‘without any strings attached’

Michael Cohen, former attorney for President Donald Trump, is sworn in before testifying to the House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing on Russian interference in the 2016 election in February. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Update April 6, 2019, 11:55 a.m. | Adds response from Michael Cohen attorney Lanny J. Davis.

House Democrats would gladly collect and listen to new information from President Donald Trump’s former personal attorney, Michael Cohen, who told lawmakers in a memo Thursday that he can provide new evidence to support his claims that the president has committed multiple crimes while in office.

Photos of the week: Cherry blossoms, Final Four prep and ‘Queer Eye’
The week of April 1 as captured by Roll Call's photographers

Aiden Anthony, right, and Cameron Foreman, both 7, participate in the Blossom Kite Festival on the National Mall on Saturday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The cherry blossoms reached peak bloom this week just in time for the annual festival celebrating the special branches.

It was a busy week on the Hill full of multiple subpoena-authorizing hearings, a speech from the NATO secretary general, basketball excitement and a visit from the Netflix stars of the show “Queer Eye.”

Democrats pound Trump with subpoenas, capping most aggressive week of oversight yet
Democrats formally demand president’s tax returns, authorize subpoenas for full Mueller report and 9 administration officials

Chairman Elijah Cummings, right, speaks as ranking member Rep. Jim Jordan, listens during the House Oversight and Reform Committee markup of a resolution authorizing issuance of subpoenas related to security clearances and the 2020 Census on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

As President Donald Trump tried to move on this week from the special counsel’s Russia investigation, Democratic investigators mashed the gas pedal on their various oversight probes, authorizing subpoenas for the full Mueller report and for nine current and former Trump administration officials.

And on Wednesday afternoon, the House Ways and Means Committee formally kicked off its pursuit of the president’s tax returns, capping what has been the most aggressive week of this Congress’ oversight of the administration to date.

Capitol Ink | Subpoena Blossoms

Democrats ramp up investigations with subpoenas for Barr, Ross
House Oversight Committee to authorize subpoenas for citizenship question on 2020 census, possible abuse of security clearance policy

Chairman Elijah Cummings, right, speaks as ranking member Jim Jordan listens on Tuesday during the House Oversight and Reform Committee markup of a resolution authorizing issuance of subpoenas to White House officials over security clearances and the 2020 census. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House Committee on Oversight and Reform authorized a series of subpoenas Tuesday targeting Attorney General William Barr, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, and two other officials with knowledge of the administration’s proposed U.S. Census citizenship question and alleged abuse of the White House’s security clearance policy.

The committee's subpoena resolution related to the citizenship question also demands Justice Department documents and DOJ’s communications with Ross in 2017 and 2018, when Ross proposed that the citizenship question be added to the 2020 census.

Democrats preparing to unleash subpoenas over Trump security clearances
Oversight Committee is investigating potential abuses of the White House’s security clearance policy

House Committee on Oversight and Reformer Chairman Elijah Cummings, D-Md., is preparing to issue subpoenas for his investigation into alleged security clearance policy abuses in the Donald Trump White House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Chairman Elijah Cummings hinted Monday that his House Committee on Oversight and Reform is preparing to unleash a series of subpoenas starting this week for their investigation into the White House’s security clearance policy.

Cummings plans to authorize a subpoena on Tuesday for former White House personnel security director Carl Kline, who now works at the Department of Defense. Kline, who served in the White House for the first two years of Trump’s administration, did not respond to letters from the Oversight Committee in February and March asking him to come in for a voluntary interview.