Elections

Opinion: Trump Needs to Reread ‘The Art of the Comeback’
The president’s political embrace and his threats are both equally empty

President Donald Trump waves to the crowd after addressing a joint session of Congress in the Capitol's House Chamber, February 28, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

After just nine weeks in the Oval Office, Donald Trump is already forced to resort to his third book, “The Art of the Comeback.”

From James Comey’s artfully cloaked shiv in last Monday’s congressional testimony to the head-for-the-lifeboats abandonment of Trumpcare on Friday, it is hard to recall a president who has had a worse week without someone being indicted.

Lawmakers Predict GOP Bill Will Be 2018 Campaign Issue
Republicans may still be tethered to a bill that was never put to a vote

Former National Republican Congressional Committee Chairman Greg Walden leaves a meeting of the House Republican Conference where Speaker Paul D. Ryan announced the vote for leadership’s health care plan had been canceled. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Republicans won’t have a recorded vote on leadership’s health care plan but that doesn’t mean their position on it won’t be used against them in campaign ads in 2018. 

Former National Republican Congressional Committee Chairman Greg Walden, now chairman of the Energy and Commerce Committee, admitted as much Friday evening. “Everybody staked out their position so they’ll be able to reap the benefit of that position or take the hit,” he told Roll Call.

Opinion: The GOP’s Big Health Care Winner — Mitch McConnell
House in flames but crisis avoided in the Senate

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell remains untarnished by the GOP effort to repeal the 2010 health care law, Allen writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

There’s exactly one big winner in the Republican leadership right now: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell

The Kentucky Republican, long known for his sixth-sense acumen as a political and legislative strategist, completely avoided the direct and collateral damage of the GOP health care debacle of 2017.

Van Hollen Frames Trump Proposals as Dicey for GOP
DSCC chief cites health care plan, budget as politically tricky

Maryland Sen. Chris Van Hollen says President Donald Trump’s proposals betray his supporters. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Former Rep. Owens Recalls Pressure Over Obamacare Vote
Obama tried making the final sell, left strong-arming to others

Former Rep. Bill Owens, D-N.Y., recalled the pressure he faced on his 2010 health care vote. (Bill Clark/Roll Call file photo)

Trump Loss on Health Care Could Roil Markets
Investors dialing back expectations president’s agenda will be enacted swiftly

Investors are worried a failure on health care repeal and replace for President Donald Trump could weaken markets. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A potential failure to pass the proposed Republican replacement to the 2010 health care law could result in investors wanting to sell, analysts say.

Before the vote on the bill was postponed, investors were reducing hopes President Donald Trump could swiftly enact the rest of his agenda, Reuters reported.

House GOP Heads Into Health Care Vote ‘Between a Rock and a Hard Place’
Regardless of outcome, Republicans will walk away with losses

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., has been trying to woo undecided Republicans to support the health care bill as a do-or-die vote approaches on Friday. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The outcome of Friday’s House vote to partially repeal and replace the 2010 health care law is not certain, but one thing is: All parties to the Republican negotiations will walk away with some losses.

After a marathon few weeks of debate over the health care measure, President Donald Trump decided he was done dealing and urged the House to vote on the measure and let the chips fall where they may.

Rep. Swalwell Mistaken for Actor Jerry O’Connell
Congressman tweets #sorrynotsorry over the confusion

Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., was confused for actor Jerry O'Connell by people on Twitter. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Eric Swalwell was confused for actor Jerry O’Connell during Monday’s House Intelligence Committee hearing.

The high-profile hearing over Russian meddling in the 2016 election attracted a lot of casual viewers who pointed out the resemblance between the actor and the congressman.

Indiana Headed for Another Member-on-Member Senate Primary
Messer close to announcing a bid and Rokita expected to follow

Indiana Rep. Luke Messer is assumed to be running for Senate, but he could be joined by another member of the Indiana delegation. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Hoosier politicos call it the “Wabash mafia.” And now two graduates of the tiny, all-male college in Indiana are likely to face off in the Republican primary to take on Democratic Sen. Joe Donnelly in 2018.

GOP Reps. Luke Messer and Todd Rokita graduated from Wabash College just one year apart. And while neither has officially entered the race, they’re both making moves that suggest this cycle’s primary could again feature member-on-member theatrics.

Nuclear Option Looms as Supreme Court Hearings Wrap Up
Senators ready to blame opposing party for any upending of Senate rules

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch testifies on the second day of his Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

With Judge Neil Gorsuch’s Supreme Court confirmation hearings wrapping up, senators will soon confront whether his nomination will upend Senate rules.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has not yet said  whether he would move to change Senate rules that currently require 60 votes to end debate on Gorsuch’s nomination. If eight members of the Democratic caucus do not join the 52 Republicans to move the nomination forward, McConnell could move to change the rules, lowering the threshold to a simple majority.