Eleanor Holmes Norton

Legal pot makes it harder to recruit truck drivers, industry leader says
Companies find applicants withdraw when they learn of hair sample tests for drug use

Cannabis plants grow in the greenhouse Johnstown, N.Y. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images file photo)

As the trucking industry struggles with a driver shortage, the president of a major lobby placed part of the blame on wider acceptance by states of marijuana use.

American Trucking Associations President and CEO Chris Spear told lawmakers at a Wednesday hearing that legalization of recreational marijuana by states is making it harder for the industry to find drug-free drivers. Still, low pay and poor working conditions are also hurdles to industry recruitment, according to a union leader.

DC statehood bill set for hearing with new backing from Hoyer
House majority leader’s support means Democrats united, but action in GOP-led Senate unlikely

Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., and District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser announced the House Committee on Oversight and Reform will hold a hearing on making the district a state. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The District of Columbia statehood movement is heading to Capitol Hill this summer, now backed for the first time by Marylander and House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer. The chamber’s Oversight and Reform Committee has scheduled a July 24 hearing on legislation that would make the District the 51st state.

The measure is sponsored by Democrat Eleanor Holmes Norton, Washington’s nonvoting representative in the House, who announced the hearing Thursday at an event at the D.C. War Memorial on the National Mall. She was joined by the District’s mayor, Muriel Bowser, and D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson.

Trump aide sees room for talks on Democrats’ opioid bill
Trump’s top drug control official left the door open to a bipartisan deal on a bill authorizing billions to address opioid crisis

From left, Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., Reps. Peter Welch, D-Vt., Elijah Cummings, D-Md., and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., conduct a news conference in the Capitol on January 10, 2019. Cummings and Elizabeth Warren released a draft bill Wednesday that would authorize $100 billion over a decade to address the opioid crisis. Trump’s aide left the door open Thursday for a bipartisan solution with the bill’s sponsors. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats got a surprising compliment from the Trump administration’s top drug control official at a Thursday hearing as they discussed boosting opioid addiction treatment funding, while Republicans promoted efforts to stem illegal drugs through securing the southern border.

House Oversight and Reform Government Operations Subcommittee Chairman Gerald E. Connolly, D-Va., who presided at the full committee hearing, touted a draft bill that Chairman Elijah E. Cummings of Maryland released with Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren on Wednesday that would authorize $100 billion over 10 years to address the crisis. The bill, which is supported by all of the committee’s Democrats, faces a tough path to becoming law without Republican support.

First Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and now John Lewis: Lawmakers get the documentary treatment
CNN’s John Lewis film will follow the civil rights icon and lawmaker

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., walks up the House steps for a vote in the Capitol. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Civil rights icon John Lewis will become the latest political figure to get the film treatment when CNN wraps production on a documentary following the lawmaker from the 2018 midterm election through 2019.The film, which is currently untitled, will feature present-day interviews with the Georgia Democrat and explore his childhood and more than 60-year career in public service and social activism, which was inspired by a 1957 meeting with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The documentary will also include interviews with Lewis’ family, political leaders and congressional colleagues, according to CNN Films.The Lewis film comes on the heels of several CNN-produced political documentaries and miniseries, including ones on Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, President Richard Nixon and the Bush political dynasty. Meanwhile, Netflix just released a 2018 campaign documentary that heavily features New York Democrat Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who, along with Sen. Bernie Sanders, is the subject of a comic book series from Devils Due comics. (Lewis got his own comic book series a few years back.)

The Georgia Democrat started as a civil rights activist in the 1960s by helping to form the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. The group included many figures who would go on to prominence, including Stokely Carmichael, James Forman, Julian Bond, late D.C. mayor Marion Barry and Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton.

Congressional fight over DC weed legalization could get sticky
District allows possession of small amounts of marijuana, but wants ability to tax sales

A U.S. flag redesigned with marijuana leaves flies over a protest in front of the Capitol. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Mayor Muriel Bowser’s proposal to fully legalize marijuana in the District of Columbia could set up another clash with Congress over cannabis laws, so maybe don’t go investing in Flamin’ Hot Cheetos or Cap’n Crunch cereal just yet.

Before the District goes up in smoke, Congress, which has jurisdiction over how D.C. executes its laws, could decide the fate of Bowser’s Safe Cannabis Sales Act of 2019.

How the murder of a young Senate aide ushered in the ‘tough on crime’ era
After Tom Barnes died of a gunshot wound to the head in the ’90s, his boss called for the death penalty. D.C. is still feeling the aftershocks

A poster tacked up on Acker Street in Northeast pleads for information leading to Tom Barnes’ killer in 1992. (Maureen Keating/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The worst thing Toof Brown has ever had to do is call the parents of Tom Barnes and tell them their son had been shot in the head.

On Saturday, Jan. 11, 1992, Barnes noticed he was low on coffee. So the 25-year-old Senate staffer put on his duck boots, left his rowhouse on Acker Street and headed to a local corner market. He’d lived in the neighborhood, about six blocks east of the U.S. Capitol, for roughly two months.

Women share pride in Eleanor Holmes Norton dedication at Georgetown Law
Friends and supporters laud D.C. delegate’s role in ‘civil rights and women’s rights and D.C. rights’

Breaking ground on the Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton Green and monument at Georgetown Law Center are, from left, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser; Georgetown Law Center Dean William Treanor; Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C.; Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md.; and Georgetown President John DeGioia. (Clyde McGrady/CQ Roll Call)

The Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton Green at Georgetown University Law Center is a point of pride for the women in attendance for its groundbreaking Tuesday.

Surrounded by her children, grandchildren, colleagues and friends among the 150 supporters beneath a white reception tent on the law center’s green, Norton, 81, basked in the honor and recounted the civil rights and feminist battles fought during her time in and out of office.

New $1.4 billion Washington ‘money factory’ gets green light
Building new facility expected to save federal government $601 million

Sheets of $1.00 bills, Bureau of Engraving and Printing, in September 1994. (Photo by Maureen Keating/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images)

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing has the newly minted legal authority to go ahead with a roughly $1.4 billion plan to build a new money printing facility in the Washington, D.C., area to replace its existing 105-year-old hulk on 14th Street.

Thanks to one sentence in the 1,165-page fiscal 2019 omnibus spending law covering nine Cabinet departments, including Treasury, the bureau’s existing ability to tap the deep pockets of the Federal Reserve are married with additional authority to buy land for and build the new plant.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez calls out dark money ‘shaping’ questions about reform bill
Ethics expert calls it a ‘fox guarding the henhouse situation’

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., attends a House Financial Services Committee organizational meeting in Rayburn Building on Jan. 30. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

In a hearing about government ethics, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez turned the spotlight on her colleagues in the room.

Can members of Congress finance their campaigns with the aid of corporate PACs representing industries like fossil fuels and pharmaceuticals, and then legislate according to the interests of those industries?

Rayburn’s &pizza set for a grand opening Feb. 6
The fast-casual pizzeria’s Capitol location will be the 33rd shop for the chain, which calls itself a ‘homegrown D.C. craft pie purveyor’

A new &pizza will open Feb. 6 in the Rayburn House Office Building. (Courtesy &pizza)

A new &pizza is set to open on the Capitol campus Feb. 6, with a grand opening in the Rayburn House Office Building.

The Rayburn &pizza location will be the 33rd shop for the chain, which calls itself a “homegrown D.C. craft pie purveyor.”