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Word on the Hill: Joint Session
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President Donald Trump’s last big event at the Capitol was his inauguration. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump heads to the Capitol today for his first address to a joint session of Congress, and as a result we don’t get to go to Mardi Gras.

The Capitol will be restricted to those with event credentials, starting at 5:30 p.m. See our list of restrictions around the complex.

Trump’s Cabinet Racks Up ‘No’ Votes in Senate
Congress has delivered more votes against Trump's Cabinet than the last four presidents' Cabinets combined

The most contentious Trump Cabinet vote so far was Betsy DeVos to be Education secretary, where Vice President Mike Pence had to cast a tie-breaking vote to confirm her. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

With the president historically unpopular, Senate Democrats seem to feel free to go on record against his more controversial picks to run executive departments.

Congress has delivered to President Donald Trump’s nominees 252 “no” votes. That’s more than the total “no” votes for the nominees of the four previous presidents combined.

Guest List: Who Members of Congress Are Taking to Trump’s Address
President to make first speech to joint session of Congress on Tuesday

The guest lists are out for President Donald Trump’s first address to a joint session of Congress. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump will hold his first joint session address to Congress on Tuesday and every member is able to bring a guest to sit in the gallery.

Oftentimes, those invited are a part of what is driving the news of the day.

Word on the Hill: Busy Week
Your social calendar for the week

President Donald Trump is coming to the Capitol this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Pool)

Welcome back from recess! We’re hitting the ground running for another busy week on the Hill.

President Donald Trump’s address to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday at 9 p.m. will drive the week — make sure you plan for that.

Democrats Cast Wide for Response to Trump Address
Kentucky governor, immigration activist frame minority party debate

Beshear will deliver the Democratic response to the president's address to Congress Tuesday. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Kentucky Gov. Steven Beshear will deliver the Democratic response to President Donald Trump’s address to Congress on Tuesday and immigration activist Astrid Silva will deliver the Spanish language response, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer announced Friday.

Beshear, Kentucky’s governor from 2007 to 2015, presided over one of the 2010 health care law's successes as he implemented the law smoothly, a marked contrast to the debacle of the Healthcare.gov roll out. During his tenure, Beshear expanded affordable health care access by expanding Medicaid and shepherding the insurance exchanges on the state's own health website. His administration is credited with lowering the state’s uninsured rate from more than 20 percent to 7.5 percent.

New Pro-Obamacare Ad Features Trump Voter
Ad to run in Tennessee, home to key GOP senator

The new ad features a Trump voter. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

A campaign encouraging lawmakers not to repeal the 2010 health care law will launch two new television ads, one featuring a man who voted for President Donald Trump.

The ads are part of a “six figure” ad buy from the “Save My Care” campaign that will run in Ohio and Tennessee, according to an advance copy of the press release announcing the ads. Tennessee is home to Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Chairman Lamar Alexander, a key player in the Obamacare debate.

Word on the Hill: A Healthy Talk
D.C. awards nominations

Dr. Neal Barnard will tell you how to live a healthier life. (Courtesy Physician’s Committee for Responsible Medicine)

Learn about staying healthy this year from the Library of Congress.

As part of the LOC’s Office of Health Services and the Library of Congress Professional Association’s “Living Well Brown Bag Series,” Dr. Neal Barnard is speaking at noon today in the Mumford Room on the 6th floor of the Madison building.

Trump Rescinds Obama-Era Guidance on Transgender Students
Move affects pending SCOTUS case on transgender bathroom use

Under the previous guidelines by the Obama administration, public schools were told to allow transgender students to use the bathroom consistent with their gender identities. (Sara D. Davis/Getty Images file photo)

The Trump administration on Wednesday withdrew Obama-era guidance directing public schools to allow transgender students to use the bathroom that matches their gender identity, a move that changes a pending Supreme Court case on the contentious social issue.

A letter from the administration to the Supreme Court on Wednesday included a memo from the Education and Justice departments formally withdrawing the guidance.

Tennessee, Texas Stand Out for Strengthened Hill Sway
In Roll Call’s Clout Index for this Congress, California delegation’s longtime hold on top spot is threatened

Party affiliation and longevity have helped propel members of the Tennessee delegation such as Sen. Bob Corker into positions that convey authority and power, Hawkings writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

No state in this decade has seen a more meaningful boost than Tennessee in institutionalized congressional influence.

Only eight states, all with much bigger delegations because they’re much more populous, have more overt sway at the Capitol this year. That is one of several notable findings from the new Roll Call Clout Index, which the newspaper uses to take a quantifiable measurement of every state’s potential for power at the start of each new Congress.  

Health Coverage Questions Persist for Republicans
Chances of House GOP blueprint passing the Senate remain unclear

Speaker Paul D. Ryan told reporters the House GOP health care measure will be introduced after the Presidents Day recess but it might face opposition from Republicans in the Senate. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As Republican lawmakers face questions from constituents and colleagues about their plans to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law, there are few answers available, starting with what kind of legislation can pass the Senate. 

Republicans do not need Democratic support to undo much of the law, since they will move the legislation through the budget reconciliation process that only requires majority support in the Senate. But with only 52 Republican senators, the GOP plan will have to get support from both their conservatives and moderates, and it’s not clear what can get everyone onboard.