Economy

LGBT Staff Association Strives for More Diversity
New president Todd Sloves said the association has taken steps for Republicans to be comfortable

Todd Sloves, the new president of the LGBT Congressional Staff Association, says his group is hoping to diversify its ranks with more women, people of color and Republicans. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Todd Sloves, the new president of the LGBT Congressional Staff Association, said only in a group like his would adding Republicans be considered part of a diversity effort.

“We are now starting to get into a time when LGBT folks come to work on the Hill — [they] are Republicans, are working for Republicans, and don’t feel like they have to keep that a secret,” said Sloves, 31. “Obviously, it’s a case-by-case basis but I think that’s a sign of the fact that we no longer put out this impression that we are a Democrats-only group.”

Conversation: Rick Manning of Americans for Limited Government
Trump’s election represents ‘quantum shift’ on attitudes on free trade

Rick Manning, president of Americans for Limited Government, says current free trade deals haven’t allowed American workers to compete on the world stage. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As president of the activist group Americans for Limited Government, Rick Manning has lobbied conservatives for years about the failings of free trade deals.

He says Donald Trump’s election shows that there’s been “a quantum shift in attitude” in the U.S. toward opposing such deals, and Republicans on Capitol Hill are coming around, too.

It’s not ‘Astroturf’ if the Anger is real
Politicians should pay attention to protesters

Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz says he “absolutely” believes that disruptions at a recent town hall meeting in his district were orchestrated by paid protesters. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

To town hall or not to town hall? That is the question Republicans are struggling with this week as they’re putting their recess schedules together. 

If they hold town hall meetings, they could risk a “Chaffetz,” like the moment last week when an angry crowd shouted Rep. Jason Chaffetz down in his Utah district with news cameras on hand. But refusing to hold town hall meetings could make a member look out of touch or scared to meet with their own voters. A “tele-town hall” feels like a happy medium, right? Members can say they’ve met with constituents, without actually having to meet with constituents.

White House Puts GOP in Awkward Position
Flynn fallout, security considerations keep dominating news

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell wanted to talk about Cabinet nominations on Tuesday. But most of the questions at his press availability were about the latest scandals coming from the White House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s domination of the news, whether due to the resignation of national security adviser Michael Flynn or the spectacle of the president discussing national security at his Mar-a-Lago resort’s dining room, is putting Republican leaders in an awkward position.

“Look, I — I — you’ll have to ask those — the White House those kinds of questions,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday at his traditional media availability after the Republicans’ policy lunch. 

Flynn's Tenure as National Security Adviser Historically Brief
Michael Flynn's White House role lasted just 24 days

Former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn sits before a press conference in the White House last week. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

By RYAN KELLY and SEAN MCMINN CQ Roll Call

Michael Flynn’s resignation Monday after 24 days on the job set a new low for the tenure of a national security adviser. William H. Jackson, who served in the Eisenhower administration, previously had the shortest tenure at about three months.

Justin Trudeau’s Day of Trump and Trade
Canadian PM gets an earful about dairy industry from Paul Ryan

President Donald Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau discussed trade issues on Monday at the White House. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump signaled Monday after meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau that his promised revisions to a decades-old trade pact among the United States, Canada and Mexico would hit his southern neighbor harder than the one to the north.

The president’s remarks came as House Speaker Paul D. Ryan was also wading into trade issues with the Canadian leader, especially ones that affect industries near and dear to Ryan’s home state of Wisconsin. 

Hensarling’s Offensive on Dodd-Frank Seen as Negotiating Move
Texas Republican’s new bill strips much more of CFPB’s authority

Texas Rep. Jeb Hensarling was considered by President Donald Trump for the Treasury secretary position. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Financial Services Chairman Jeb Hensarling appears to be doubling down on his Dodd-Frank repeal legislation, adding more features objectionable to Democrats in the wake of a White House announcement of a four-month review of the nation’s financial laws and regulations. 

In a staff memo circulated last week, Hensarling filled five single-spaced pages with changes to a bill approved by his committee in September 2016 over the opposition of every Democrat and one Republican. Among other things, the Texas Republican’s new bill would strip much more of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s authority than last year’s version.

House Democrats’ ‘All of the Above’ Approach
A party seeking unity pursues multiple paths to success

House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi and her caucus spent their issues conference in Baltimore taking stock, but did not appear to coalesce around a specific strategy going forward. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

BALTIMORE — House Democratic leaders say their caucus is united, but even a minimal survey of lawmakers indicates skepticism of the messaging, an unclear path on strategy, and merely the beginning of grappling with what went wrong in an election that left them in the minority six years running.

“The mood of the members is very positive, open, confident, humble enough to listen to other ideas,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said at the Democrats’ issues retreat here. “There’s a real, deep commitment to working families in our country and that’s what unifies us.”

Tim Ryan Supporters Move Up After Criticizing Leadership
Members see few, if any, repercussions from speaking out against Pelosi

Tim Ryan, center, and his backers from his failed bid for minority leader cite few ramifications from criticizing Democratic leadership. Appearing from left are Reps. Marcia L. Fudge of Ohio, Stephen F. Lynch of Massachusetts, Ryan, and Ruben Gallego of Arizona. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)" data-mce-src="http://author.rollcall.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/dem_elections017_113016.jpg" height="1598" width="2400"> Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan, center, and his backers from his failed bid for minority leader cite few ramifications from criticizing Democratic leadership. Appearing from left are Reps. Marcia L. Fudge of Ohio, Stephen F. Lynch of Massachusetts, Ryan, and Ruben Gallego of Arizona. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A little more than two months ago, 63 House Democrats voted for a change at the top of their leadership structure. Now, in an unexpected turn of events, some of the most vocal critics of the existing power system are in new leadership positions of their own. 

Ohio Democrat Tim Ryan, who challenged House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi for her post, is now the ranking member of the House Legislative Branch Appropriations Subcommittee, a position that gives him oversight of Congress’ internal spending, including money spent on leadership offices and members’ salaries, as well as Capitol Police.

House Democrats Go to the Mat for Dodd-Frank
Minority party questions whether Trump would benefit from gutting law

Maxine Waters is helping lead the defense of Dodd-Frank. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

With their Senate colleagues on the front lines of opposing President Donald Trump’s Cabinet nominations, House Democrats are digging in for an extended fight over the president’s executive actions, in particular his targeting of the Dodd-Frank financial regulation law.

Starting over the weekend and continuing into Monday, House Democrats are defending a statute they say is key to protecting Main Street from Wall Street excesses.