Doug Collins

‘He’s a television character’: Democrats worry about Trump’s U.S. intelligence pick
Devin Nunes, another skeptic of U.S. intelligence, called the appointment a ‘great choice’

From left, Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., ranking member of the House Judiciary Committee, Reps. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, and Will Hurd, R-Texas, prepare for testimony by former special counsel Robert Mueller before the House Intelligence Committee hearing on his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election in Rayburn Building on Wednesday, July 24, 2019. He testified earlier in the day before the House Judiciary Committee. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated: 5:12 p.m.

Rep. John Ratcliffe, first appointed to the House Intelligence Committee just seven months ago, could soon be delivering the president’s daily intelligence briefings.

‘Can’t get into that’: Mueller’s testimony was too hot to handle — Congressional Hits and Misses
Week of July 22, 2019

Rep. Mark Meadows takes a photo with his phone as former special counsel Robert Mueller testifies during a House Judiciary Committee hearing on Wednesday, July 24, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

D.C. couldn’t even fill a bar on Mueller day
The ratio of drinkers to journalists was about 2:1

People watch former special counsel Robert Mueller testify before the House Judiciary Committee on TVs at Shaw’s Tavern in Washington on Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

D.C. denizens have long treated politics as a spectator sport. They invent drinking games for the State of the Union. Friends console each other while watching election night returns. And yes, bars open early for a certain House Judiciary hearing on 2016 election interference.

Who shows up to these things? After all, former special counsel Robert Mueller’s testimony was scheduled smack dab in the middle of the workday.

Mueller shuns spotlight, but says probe didn’t ‘exonerate’ Trump
President has claimed investigation cleared him of obstruction of justice

Former Special Counsel Robert Mueller leaves the witness table for a recess in the House Judiciary Committee hearing on "Oversight of the Report on the Investigation into Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election" on Wednesday, July 24, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

On a day House Democrats hoped Robert S. Mueller III’s televised testimony Wednesday would animate the special counsel’s 448-page report for the nation, the star witness eschewed the leading role with a muted performance with few soundbites during the first of two back-to-back hearings.

Mueller’s answers were concise. He often said simply, “True,” or “I rely on the language of the report.” The 74-year-old gray-haired Marine veteran and former FBI director frequently didn’t speak into the mic.

GOP spending hawks hang up 9/11 bill; passage still likely
Fiscal hawks, Sens. Lee and Paul, often oppose new spending unless paid for with cuts elsewhere in the federal budget

Comedian Jon Stewart is a strong advocate for the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A House-passed bill that would extend a financial lifeline to thousands of victims suffering health problems from the 9/11 terrorist attacks is facing some political resistance in the Senate.

Utah Republican Mike Lee has a hold on the legislation, according to the nation’s top firefighters union. And Kentucky Republican Rand Paul objected Wednesday when New York Democrat Kirsten Gillibrand sought unanimous consent to bring up the bill for a vote.

House’s condemnation of Trump may just be the beginning
Now the debate is over push by some Democrats for impeachment

Speaker Nancy Pelosi and senior aide Wendell Primus leave the House floor on Tuesday as turmoil gripped the chamber. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Although Tuesday’s long day of heated debate ended with the House voting to condemn President Donald Trump for racist tweets, the chamber’s brawl over the president’s behavior may be just beginning. 

The House voted, 240-187, to approve a nonbinding resolution that says the chamber “strongly condemns” Trump’s “racist comments that have legitimized and increased fear and hatred of new Americans and people of color.”

‘I abandon the chair’: House floor in chaos over Pelosi speech on Trump tweets

Rep. Emanuel Cleaver II, D-Mo., abandoned the chair amid the debate over a resolution condemning the president’s tweets. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Amid debate over whether to condemn tweets by President Donald Trump as racist on Tuesday, the House descended into parliamentary chaos, with Rep. Emanuel Cleaver II, who was presiding, abruptly dropping the gavel and saying, “I abandon the chair.”

It was an extraordinary moment on an extraordinary day, as the House considered a resolution condemning Trump’s tweets from the weekend that told four freshman Democrats from the House to “go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came.”

L for loser, a real clap and a gentle gavel: Congressional Hits and Misses
Week of July 8, 2019

Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., left, and ranking member Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., conduct a House Judiciary Committee markup up in Rayburn Building on a resolution to authorize subpoenas related to the Trump administration on Thursday, July 11, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

9/11 aid bill passes House after emotional lobbying campaign
It was passed by the lopsided margin of 402-12

From left, comedian and advocate Jon Stewart, Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., are on the Speaker's balcony after a meeting in the Capitol about funding for the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund on Tuesday, June 11, 2019. 9/11 responders attended the meeting. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House voted Friday to extend a financial lifeline to thousands of victims suffering health problems from the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on New York and Washington.

By the lopsided margin of 402-12, the House passed legislation that would effectively make permanent a special compensation fund for first-responders and other victims of the 2001 attacks, while providing however much money is needed to pay all eligible claims.

Mueller hearing format gets complaints from junior Judiciary members
GOP members aired complaints that testimony from Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III would be limited to 2 hours

Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., and ranking member Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., conduct a House Judiciary Committee markup May 8, 2019. Collins and other Republicans expressed concern that testimony from Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III would be limited to two hours next week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee aired complaints Thursday that testimony from Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III would be limited to two hours next week — meaning some members from both parties won’t get an opportunity to ask questions.

Rep. Doug Collins of Georgia, the committee’s top Republican, was among the members who described a format that would have Mueller leave to appear before the House Intelligence Committee, a smaller panel where all members are expected to have time to ask questions.