Donna Edwards

The Road Ahead for Donna Edwards
Future may involve academia or local political office

After leaving Congress, Maryland Democrat Donna Edwards hit the road in a 25-foot RV named Lucille. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Nine months after losing a hard-fought race for a Senate seat in Maryland’s Democratic primary — and just days after ending nearly a decade of service in the House — Donna Edwards hit the road.

Not just to get away, she said on Facebook, but “to meet people who don’t think about politics all the time but whose lives are affected by politics every day.”

Congressional Women’s Softball Prepares to Lose a Staple
Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, who has played since game was started in 2009, announced retirement earlier

Florida Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen is expected to play her final Congressional Women’s Softball Game next year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After an election, there are always comings and goings from the Congressional Women’s Softball Game rosters. But the biggest news of the offseason this year was that the game will soon be losing Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen.

The Florida Republican has played in the charity event pitting female lawmakers against members of the media since the first one in 2009. But she announced last month that she will be retiring after her current term. 

Word on the Hill: Capitol Artwork Wrapped
Former congresswoman joins NYU, and conservative senators get ranked

Paintings have been wrapped on the Senate side of the Capitol during testing of a new smoke control system. (Niels Lesniewski/CQ Roll Call)

You may have noticed that some paintings and busts around the Capitol are covered in a plastic wrapping.

The artwork located in the corridors and grand stairwells of the Capitol are all covered for their protection during the testing of the new smoke control system

Tennessee, Texas Stand Out for Strengthened Hill Sway
In Roll Call’s Clout Index for this Congress, California delegation’s longtime hold on top spot is threatened

Party affiliation and longevity have helped propel members of the Tennessee delegation such as Sen. Bob Corker into positions that convey authority and power, Hawkings writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

No state in this decade has seen a more meaningful boost than Tennessee in institutionalized congressional influence.

Only eight states, all with much bigger delegations because they’re much more populous, have more overt sway at the Capitol this year. That is one of several notable findings from the new Roll Call Clout Index, which the newspaper uses to take a quantifiable measurement of every state’s potential for power at the start of each new Congress.  

Is There Space for a Republican EMILY’s List?
Litmus tests might not work the same way on the right

Alabama’s Martha Roby is one of only 26 Republican women in Congress. Some party members wonder if they need their own version of EMILY’s List to increase that number. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

As recently as the second Reagan administration, Republicans had more women in Congress than Democrats. Then EMILY’s List took hold.

The political action committee, founded in 1984, dedicated itself to electing Democratic women who support abortion rights, becoming an influential force in primaries even when it clashed with the wishes of party leaders. Now, of the 104 women in the 115th Congress, 75 percent are Democrats.

Here’s Whose 2016 Sucked the Most in Washington
From Hillary Clinton to Paul Ryan to Senate Democratic candidates

2016 in a word? Meh. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images file photo)

Democrats Voting on Pelosi Are Older But Not Long-Tenured
A majority of the incoming caucus is 60 or older but most members have served 4 terms or less

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The House Democrats who will decide this week whether it’s time for younger, less-tenured leadership have served in the chamber an average of close to six full terms, and nearly six in 10 are over the age of 60. 

Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi has drawn criticism for not fostering leadership opportunities for younger caucus members. The 76-year-old Californian, who has been the chamber’s top Democrat since 2003, is facing a challenge from 43-year-old Tim Ryan, a seven-term congressman from Ohio, who says that after four straight disappointing elections for House Democrats, it’s time for a change at the top. 

Gubernatorial Losers Descend on Next Congress
Up to six new House Members previously lost a race for governor

Rep.-elect Anthony Brown, who lost a governor’s race in Maryland two years ago, walks down the House steps for the 115th Congress freshman class group photo during the first week of orientation on Nov. 15. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Getting to know your new classmates is always an awkward experience, but a handful of new House members will have at least one thing in common: losing a race for governor.

Two years ago, Democrat Anthony Brown lost the Maryland gubernatorial race to Republican Larry Hogan in an upset, 51 percent to 47 percent. But the former lieutenant governor rebounded to win a competitive Democratic primary this year in Maryland’s 4th District when Rep. Donna Edwards decided to run for the Senate. Brown cruised in the general election and will be coming to Congress next year.

Pelosi Nominates Members for Leadership Positions
Four of seven would be new to leadership

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi has nominated Rep. John Yarmuth, D-Ky., to serve as ranking member of the Budget Committee. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi on Friday nominated seven members for positions in Democratic leadership that will not be finalized until ratified by the Democratic Caucus. 

Pelosi announced the nominations — four of which would be new members of leadership if confirmed by the caucus — in a dear colleague letter. 

New Member: Democrat Anthony Brown Elected in Maryland’s 4th District
Incumbent Rep. Donna Edwards vacated seat for a Senate run

Democrat Anthony Brown won the open seat election for Maryland's 4th Congressional District against Republican challenger George McDermott. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrat Anthony Brown will defeat Republican George McDermott in Maryland's 4th District, The Associated Press projects.

Brown led McDermott 82 percent to 15 percent with 62 percent of precincts reporting.